The Social Production of Indifference

Εξώφυλλο
University of Chicago Press, 1993 - 207 σελίδες
In this fascinating book, Michael Herzfeld argues that 'modern' bureaucratically regulated societies are no more 'rational' or less 'symbolic' than the societies traditionally studied by anthropologists. Drawing primarily on the example of modern Greece and utilizing other European materials, he suggests that we cannot understand national bureaucracies divorced from local-level ideas about chance, personal character, social relationships and responsibility. He points out that both formal regulations and day-to-day bureaucratic practices rely heavily on the symbols and language of the moral boundaries between insiders and outsiders; a ready means of expressing prejudice and of justifying neglect. It therefore happens that societies with proud traditions of generous hospitality may paradoxically produce at the official level some of the most calculated indifference one can find anywhere.
 

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Περιεχόμενα

The Social Production of Indifference
3
One World or Two?
19
The Roots of Indifference
50
The Creativity of Stereotypes
73
The Language Fetish
100
Retrospective Fatalities
129
Declassifications
160
REFERENCES
187
INDEX
201
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Σχετικά με τον συγγραφέα (1993)

Michael Herzfeld is the Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University and has taught at several other universities worldwide. He is the author of many books.nbsp;

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