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PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS.

homes are dweiling heroes and patriots whose Michigan; also, the petition of William Burt, and 45 warehouses is in effect a heavy tax on trade pames shall never die.

others, of Detroit, Michigan; also, the petition of without any advantage to the revenue, and But greatest among all these great develop

Hiram Walker, and 3 others, of Detroit; also, tho
petition of L. Black & Co., and 61 others, of Detroiti

praying for a modification of the law so that ments were the character and fame of Abraham also, the petition of A. Shelley, and 112 others, of De they may be relieved from its payment; which Lincoln, whose loss the nation still deplores.

troit; also, the petition of R: Vernor, and 21 others, was referred to the Committee on Finance.

of Detroit; also, tha petition of John L. Whiting, and His character is aptly described in the words 33 others, of Detroit, Michigan; all praying Congress

He also presented a petition of wool-growers, of England's great laureate-written thirty to enact such just and cqual laws for the regulation residing in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, years ago-in which he traces the upward steps of inter-State insurances of all kinds as may be ef

praying for an increase of the duty on the imof some

fectual in establishing the greatest security for the
"Divinely gifted man,
interests protected by policies and promotive of the

portations of foreign wool into the United Whose life in low estate began,.

greatest good and convenience to all concerned in States; which was referred to the Committee

such transactions.
And on a simple villago green;"

on Finance.
Also, the petition of Ethel Judd, and 51 others,
"Who breaks his birth's in vidions bar,
inhabitants of Hilisdale county, Michigan, praying

Mr. MORGAN. I present concurrent reg.
And grasps the skirts of happy chance,

for increase of duty on all unwashed foreign wool. And breasts the blows of circumstance, By Nr. DELANO: The petition of D. G. Weth, ing for the passage of an act of Congress

olutions of the Legislature of New York, askAnd grapples with his evil star;

county, Ohio, praying an increased anty on foreign appropriating the sum of $877,628 to pay the "Who makes by force his merit known,

wools for the benefit of wool-growers of this country. claims of the seventeen thousand two hundred And lives to clutch the goldon keys To mold a mighty State's decrees,

and twenty-eight persons which have been And shape the whisper of the throne;

IN SENATE.

audited and found due for clothing and other "And moring up from high to higher,

Monday, April 16, 1866.

contingent expenses of the militia of the State Becomes on Fortune's crowning slope,

of New York who served in the war of 1812, The pillar of a people's hope,..

Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. E. H. GRAY. which clothing and other expenses were necesThe center of a world's desire."

The Secretary proceeded to read the Journal sary and unavoidable in consequence of the Such a life and character will be treasured of Friday last.

inadequate compensation of eight dollars a forever as the sacred possession of the Amer

Mr. ANTHONY. I think it is hardly neces- month, without bounty or an allowance for ican people and of mankind.

In the great

sary to read this record of pension bills; it is clothing, provided by the act of Congress audrama of the rebellion there were two acts.

very long indeed; and I move that the further thorizing the President to call out the militia, The first was the war with its battles and sieges, reading of the Journal be dispensed with. by draft or otherwise, for a period not exceedvictories and defeats, its sufferings and tears.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. It requires | ing six months. They have also instructed That act was closing one year ago to-night,

unanimous consent to dispense with the read their Senators and requested their Representaand jnst as the curtain was listing on the second

ing of the Journal. If there be no objection, tives to vote for the passage of such an act, and final act, the restoration of peace and lib

it will be considered the sense of the Senate I move that the resolutions be printed, and erty; just as the curtain was rising upon new

that the further reading be dispensed with. referred to the Committee on Claims. characters and new events, the evil spirit of

The motion was agreed to. the rebellion, in the fury of despair, nerved

Mr. WILLIAMS. I present the memorial

Mr. DOOLITTLE presented a communicaand directed the hand of the assassin to strike of the Oregon City Manufacturing Company, in

tion addressed to him, from the Secretary of down the chief character in both. which it is represented that that company is

the Interior, transmitting estimates of approIt was no one man who killed Abraham now engaged in the manufacture of woolen

priations required for fulfilling treaty stipulaLincoln; it was the embodied spirit of treason and slavery, inspired with fearful and despair. 1 of ready-made clothing in its own mills out of cloths, and is also engaged in the manufacture

tions with certain bands of Dakota or Sioux

Indians, under treaties ratified by the Senate ing hate, that struck hiin down in the moment

since the 1st of December last; which was reof the nation's supremest joy:

the cloths of its own production, and it further
Ali sir, there are times in the history of men
represents that, by a decision of the Commis-

ferred to the Committee on Finance.
sioner of Internal Revenue, the company is

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. and nations when they stand so near the veil

made liable to pay a tax, first, on the value of that separates mortals from the immortals, time the cloth manufactured, and then upon the

Mr. LANE, of Indiana, from the Committee from eternity, and men from their God, that entire value of the ready-made clothing; and

on Military Affairs and the Militia, to whom they can almost hear the beatings and feel the the memorial prays that the revenue law may

was referred a joint resolution (H. R. No. 107) pulsations of the heart of the Infinite. Through | be so modified that after the payment of the

for the relief of Rev. Harrison Heermarce, late such a time has this nation passed. When

tax upon the value of the cloth, the company chaplain of the one hundred and twenty-eighth two hundred and fifty thousand brave spirits may be relieved from the payment of any tax

regiment New York volunteers, reported it passed from the field of honor through that thin

without amendment. except upon the increased value made by conveil to the presence of God, and when at last | verting the cloth into clothing, as is the case in

Mr. WILSON, from the Committee on Mil. its parting földs admitted the martyr President

reference to fabrics made out of cotton cloths. itary Affairs and the Militia, to whom was to the coinpany of the dead heroes of the ReI move that this memorial be referred to the

referred a joint resolution (S. R. No. 57) public, the nation stood so near the veil that the Committee on Finance.

appointing a board of managers for the Nawhispers of God were heard by the children of

The motion was agreed to.

tional Military Asylum, reported it adversely. men.

He also, from the same committee, to whom Awe-stricken by His voice, the American peo

Mr. HOWARD presented the memorial of

was referred a joint resolution (H. R. No. 108) ple knelt in tearful reverence and made a sol. Henry Miller and others, citizens of Detroit

: appointing managers for the National Asylum emn covenant with Him and with each other

Michigan, engaged in the manufacture of malt for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, reported it that this nation should be saved from its eneliquors, praying for a reduction of duties on

without amendment. mies, that all its glories should be restored, foreign barley imported into the United States;

He also, from the same committee, to whom which was referred to the Committee on Fiand on the ruins of slavery and treason the

was referred a joint resolution (H. R. No. 88) nance. temples of freedom and justice should be built and should survive forever. It remains for us,

Mr. HENDRICKS presented the memorial

expressive of the thanks of Congress to Major

General Winfield S. Hancock, reported it withof Lieutenant Commander R. L. Law, pray. consecrated by that great event, and under a

out amendment. corenant with God, to keep that faith, to go ing to be restored to active duty in the Navy;

He also, from the same committee, to whom which was referred to the Committee on Naval forward in the great work until it shall be com

was referred a bill (S. No. 262) to provide for Aflairs, pleted.

the national defense by establishing a uniform Following the lead of that great man and

He also presented a communication ad

militia and organizing an active volunteer

of obeying the high behests of God, let us rememdressed to him, from James F. Mil

militia force throughout the United States, ber thatPeru, Indiana, representing that frands have

reported it without amendment. been perpetrated upon the Miami Indians of "He has sounded forth a trumpet thatshall never call

Mr. SPRAGUE, from the Committee on Indiana, growing out of a misapplication of Military Affairs and the Militia, to whom was He is sitting out the hearts of men before lis judg the funds granted them by the treaty of June

referred the bill (F. R. No. 472) for the relief 5, 1854, and praying for an investigation of the Be swift my soul to answer him, be jubilant my feet;

of George R. Frank, late captain thirty-third For God is marching on." matter; which was referred to the Committee

regiment Wisconsin volunteerinfantry, reported on Indian Affairs. I move, sir, that this House do now adjourn.

it without amendment.

Mr. COWAN presented a memorial of mem-
The motion was agreed to; and thereupon

Mr. VAN WINKLE, from the Committee bers of the bar of Washington county, Penn(at fifteen minutes after twelve o'clock) the

on Post Offices and Post Roads, to whom was sylvania, and also a memorial of members of House adjourned.

referred the petition of Duncan G. MacRae, the bar of Venango, county, Pennsylvania, praying for compensation for services rendered

praying that the salaries of the judges of the
PETITIONS, ETC.
United States district courts may be increased;

in carrying the mail in North Carolina, asked

to be discharged from its further consideration; The following petitions. &c., were presented under which were referred to the Committee on the

which was agreed to. the rule and referred to the appropriate committees: Judiciary. By Jr. BEAMAN: The petition of John S. Strong,

AMERICAN REGISTERS TO VESSELS. He also presented the petition of Alexander and 3 others. of Lenawce county, Michigan; also, the Dution of James C. Watson, and 31 others, of Ann

Young, John Gibson, and others, distillers On motion of Mr. CHANDLER, it was Arbor. Michigan; also, the petition of Professor E.

and dealers in domestic spirits in the city of Ordered, That the amendments of the House of Durand, and 3 others, of Chelsea, Washtenaw county, Philadelphia, in which they represent that the

Representatives to the bill (S. No. 89) to issue AmerMinbizan; also, the petition of John H. Burleson, exaction of personal security for the payment

ican registers to the steam vessels Michigan and Dis41.6 12 others, of Ann Arbor, Michigan; also, the pe

patch and W. K. Muir, be referred to the Comunittee ution of B. C. Benson, and 35 others, of Jonesville, of duties on spirits deposited in general bonded ou Commerce.

39TH Cong. 1st Sess.- No. 123.

retreat:

mnent seat.

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BILLS INTRODUCED.

read twice by its title, referred to the Committee is

nized or accepted and paid by the United || Senate, for report, to the Interior Department | pany was relieved of the obligation to build it;

and may be sold to officers, soldiers, or citizens, at a call may be made upon him, if he is to be

price which shall not more than cover the actual cost Mr. RAMSEY asked, and by unanimous con

called upon to report upon it. The object is of paper, printing, anii binding; and shall not, in any sent obtained, leave to introduce a bill (S. No. case, exceed one dollar per volume.

to get a report in order that it may be referred

to the Committee on Indian Affairs for exam266) to establish additional offices for the assay

I suppose it was the idea of the Senate when of gold and silver, and for other purposes; which

ination. The claimant is now deceased, and this resolution was passed that the roster cond was read twice by its title, referred to the Com

the proceedings to be taken are in behalf of be printed in about one volume, but I find that

his widow. mittee on Finance, and ordered to be printed. it will take eight volumes, and to print an ediHe also asked, and by unanimous consent | tion of twenty-five thousand copies of eight

The resolution was adopted. obtained, leave to introduce a joint resolution volumes will cost $200,000. I should think

SIOUX CITY BRANCII PACIFIC RAILROAD. (S. R. No. 61) for the appointment of a com the probability of the Government being reim Mr. HOWARD. I move to take up Senate mission to consist of engineers of the Army bursed by the sale of those copies of any con bill No. 103, upon the subject of the construction of railroad

siderable portion of the expense of publication The motion was agreed to; and the Senate, ; is very doubtful indeed.

as in Committee of the Whole, proceeded to

But that is not all. This resolution requires consider the bill (S. No. 109) to rescind the on Commerce, and ordered to be printed. that the roster shall include "all informal order of the President designating the Sioux

Mr. STEWART asked, and by unanimous organizations which have been recognized or City and Pacific Railroad Company to conconsent obtained, leave to introduce a joint accepted and paid by the United States." Now, I struct the branch of the Union Pacific railroad resolution (S. R. No. 65) for the discontinu

I find in looking over this Register, that the first from Sioux City: ance of New Orleans branch mint, and for the New Hampshire regiment, under Colonel Tap. As the President of the United States, on appropriation of the machinery thereof to the

pan, is not named; the sixth Massachusetts the 24th of December, 1864, designated the construction of the branch mint in Nevada; || regiment, which marched through Baltimore Sioux City and Pacific Railroad Company, a which was read twice by its title, referred to

and drew the first blood of the rebellion, is not corporation of the State of Iowa, for the purthe Committee on Finance, and ordered to be mentioned; and the eighth Massachusetts regi- | pose of constructing and operating the branch printed.

ment, which opened the road from Annapolis, of the Union Pacific railroad, authorized to be Mr. JOHNSON asked, and by unanimous

is not mentioned, Both those regiments re constructed by the seventeenth section of the consent obtained, leave to introduce a bill (S.

ceived the thanks of Congress; and yet in this act of Congress approved July 2, 1864, entiNo. 267) authorizing the establishment of a

roster, which was to include not only all the tled "An act to amend an act to aid in the navy-yard and a coal and naval depot at the

regiments in the service, but all the informal construction of a railroad and telegraph line harbor of Annapolis; which was read twice organizations, those regiments are not even

from the Missouri river to the Pacific ocean, by its title, and referred to the Committee on named. I find also that the first Rhode Island | &c.; and as that company has filed a map in Naval Affairs.

regiment, which came by the way of Annapolis | the Department of the Interior of the route APPROVAL OF BILLS.

to the relief of Washington, with my colleague, over which it proposes to construct the branch A message from the President of the United then Governor of Rhode Island, at the head of road; and as the construction of the branch States, by Mr. Cooper, his Secretary, announced it, under the command of Colonel Burnside, road upon the route proposed will be in viothat the President had approved and signed, on afterward a major general, and now Governor lation of the true intent and meaning of the the 13th instant, the following act and joint | elect of Rhode Island, is not mentioned. I act of Congress, the bill proposes to amend the resolutions:

find also that the first, second, and third Con order of the President designating the Sioux An act (S. No. 199) to establish the collec necticut regiments are not named. I do not City and Pacific Railroad Company to be the tion district of Port Huron, the collection dis think Congress would be willing to expend company authorized to build the branch railtrict of Michigan, the collection district of Mon $200,000 to print that sort of a roster. I do road, under and in pursuance of the seventana and Idaho, and to change the name of the not know that this can be prevented; but with teenth section of the act of Congress approved collection district of Penobscot;

regard to many regiments, instead of giving July 2, 1864, entitled "An act to amend an act A joint resolution (H. R. No. 44) author the official list of the battles in which the regi. to aid in the construction of a railroad and telizing Commodore William Radford to accept a ments bore an honorable part, I find this record : egraph line from the Missouri river to the decoration from the King of Italy;

"The official list of battles in which this regiment | Pacific ocean." A joint resolution (S. Ř. No.53) authorizing || borc an honorable part is not yet published in or Mr. HOWARD. This bill was reported to Rear Admiral II. Paulding to accept a decoraders."

the Senate by the Committee on the Pacific tion from the King of Italy; and

I find that this paragraph applies to a third Railroad several weeks since. The object of A joint resolution (S. R. No. 58), respecting of the regiments. I think it is time that those it is to set aside an order made by President the burial of soldiers who died in the military were made known, if they are ever to be made Lincoln, dated the 24th of December, 1864, service of the United States during the rebel

known. I do not know but that the delay is giving to the Sioux City Railroad Company lion.

unaroidable, but until those battles can be the right to construct what is known as the BILL RECOMMITTED.

ascertained and placed at the head of each Sioux City branch of the Pacific railroad. Mr. KIRKWOOD.

The order to which I refer is found in DocuOn Friday last, under regiment, I think this publication had better the instruction of the Committee on Public be postponed.

ment No. 14 of the Executive Documents of

This is a subject that belongs properly to Lands, I reported to the Senate the bill (H.

the present session. It is as follows: the Committee on Military Affairs, and I hope R. No. 85) for the disposal of the public lands

Whereas the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad Comfor homestead actual settlement in the States they will give it their attention.

pany, a company organized under the laws of Lowa. of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas,

I wish to say further, that I think the publi has requested the President of the United States to cation of this document is needlessly expen

designate said company "for the purpose of conand Florida, with amendments. Upon exam

structing and operating a line of railroad and telesive. The Senator from Massachusetts (Mr. ll grnph from Sioux City to such point on, and so as to ining it since it has been printed I find that it will become necessary to refer it back to the

Wilson) will find upon reading it over that connect with, the Iowa branch of the Union Pacific Committee on Public Lands, and I make that there are a great number of blank pages in it.

railroad from Omaha, or the Union Pacific railroad,

as such company may select:", motion.

The Superintendent of Public Printing sub Therefore be it known, That by the authority conThe motion was agreed to. mitted to me what I considered a much better ferred upon the President of the United States by the

seventeenth section of the act of Congress approved form, and which would be much cheaper and

July 2, 1861, entitled “ An act to amend an act to aid ARMY REGISTER.

much more convenient, but it did not seem in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line Mr. ANTIIONY. I offer the following res to meet the approbation of those who are

from the Missouri river to the Pacific ocean," &e.,

I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, olution, and ask for its present consideration : engaged upon the work. I would not under

do hereby designate the said Sioux City and Pacific Resolved, That the Committee on Military Affairs take to decide between the two. I think the Railroad Company for the purpose above mentoned. and the Militia be instructod to inquire whether the Committee on Military Affairs had better

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. full Army Register now in course of publication has been compiled in accordance with the requirement examine into the subject.

December 24, 1864. of the joint resolution approved March 2, 1805, and

The resolution was adopted.

That order, it will be observed. was dated what will be the cost of such publication.

the 24th of December, 1864. CLAIM OF GEORGE M'DOUGALL.

By the fourThere being no objection, the Senate pro

teenth section of the Pacific railroad act of ceeded to consider the resolution.

Mr. CONNESS. I offer the following reso 1862, the Union Pacific Railroad Company was Mr. ANTHONY. I wish to call the attention lution, and ask for its present consideration : bound to construct a branch from Sioux City, of the Committee on Military Affairs to this Resolved, That the Secretary of the Interior bo upon the most direct and practicable route, to resolution. This roster was printed in pursu

requested to report on the claim of George Mc-
Dougall, heretofore referred to the Secretary of the

a point on the Iowa branch or on the Pacific ance of the joint resolution approved March 2, Interior by a resolution of the Senate.

railroad, not further west than the one hun1865, which directed the publication of a full

There being no objection, the Senate pro

dredth degree of longitude. It will be seen roster or roll of all general, field, line, and staff

that this clause of the act of 1862*made it obofficers of volunteers who have been in the

ceeded to consider the resolution. Army of the United States at any time since the

Mr. CONNESS. I will state, in explana- | ligatory upon the Pacific Railroad Company to beginning of the present rebellion, including all tion of the resolution, that it refers to a claim

construct this Sioux City branch; but by the informal organizations wbich have been recog. connected with Indian affairs in California.

act of 1864, amendatory of the Pacific railroad It was formerly referred by a resolution of the

act of 1862, the Union Pacific Railroad ComStates;'' and the resolution also goes on to say: when that Department was presided over by

the amendatory And, to defray in whole or in part the expenses of this publication, an edition of twenty-five thousand Secretary Smith. No report was ever made;

“That whenever a line of railroad shall be com

pleted through the State of Iowa or Minnesota to copies of such enlarged Register shall be published,

and the present Secretary desires that a new Sioux City, such company, now organized or as may

:

The Sioux City company seem to have been stur: OMDOUGALL. It is my impression

hereafter be organized under the laws of Iowa, Min guage of the seventeenth section, from which tion with the Pacific railroad as is practicable; nesota, Dakota, or Vebraska, as the President of the United States, by its request, may designate or ap

have read, requires this route, whatever com and they do not wish to be compelled, in travprove for that purpose, shall construct and operate pany may attempt to construct the road upon eling, or in the transportation of their freight a line of railroad and telegraph from Sioux City, upon it, to be on the most direct and practicable line. and merchandise, to pass over a hundred miles the most direct and practicablo route, to such a point The words op, and so as to connect with, the Iowa branch of

are, on the most direct and prac distance upon a railroad which is entirely unthe Union Pacific railroad from Omalia, or the Union

ticable route from Sioux City," to form a con necessary so far as they are concerned; thus Pacific railroad, as such company may select, and on nection either with the Iowa bra h, the Omaha | greatly increasing the expense of travel and the same terms and conditions as are provided in this act and the act to which this is.an amendment,

branch, so called, of the Pacific railroad, or transportation. The object of the bill is to set for the construction of the said Union and Pacific with the Pacific railroad proper itself, in which aside that order and open the whole subject railroad and telegraph line and brunches; and said latter case the junction would have been at, or for competition hereafter between the compaecmpany shall complete the same at the rate of fifty miles per year."

west of, the one hundredth degree of west lon nies that may see fit to compete for the con.

struction of this branch. Such was the amendatory act of 1864, but the amendatory act also adopted the principle of not allowing the Government bonds to issue

six months after President Lincoln's order was Committee when Sioux City was made to have a on account of the road beyond the one hun. dredth degree of longitude. The company

issued, they filed a map of the route which they connection with the Pacific railroad. I can say, might extend its road further west, but it

propose to follow through Sioux City westward as all who were then members of the Senate would not be entitled to the aid of bonds, but || branch, with the line of the Union Pacific to form the junction upon the Iowa or Omaha know, that Kansas and Iowa quarreled much.

I was industrious (at least I thought I was inonly of alternate sections of land on each side of it. That was the effect of the amendatory

Railroad Company. I hold in my hand the dustrious) to secure a communication from the

map which was furnished the committee by valley of the Mississippi to my own coast, and act of 1864 compared with the original act.

the Secretary of the Interior. The company The language of the amendatory act-I refer

not very particular about how it was done so that in laying down the route of their road com it was well done. The line from Sioux City to the seventeenth section of that act, which I

mence at Sioux City on the Missouri river. was made a line of communication, but not as might, perhaps, as well read-is as follows:

Instead of proceeding to the west, however, a main line. A branch was fought for by the "Sec. 17. And be it further enacted, That so much of they proceed to the southeast. They run a extreme Northwest from St. Paul downward. section fourteen of said act as relates to a branch from Sioux City be, and the same is hereby, amended

distance of about twenty miles nearly south I am not unconversant with the topography and so as to read as follows: that whenever a line of east in the State of Iowa. After reaching the geography of that part of the world ; perhaps I railroad sball be completed through the State of most eastern point of their route, they proceed Lowa or Minnesota to Sioux City, such company, now

am quite as familiar with it as the Senator from to the south, and then to the southwest, crossorganized, or as may hereafter be organized under

Michigan; perhaps a little more so; for I do the laws of Iowa, Minnesota, Dakota, or Nebraska, ing the Missouri river, run thence almost in a not think he ever rode horses in that part of as the President of the United States, by its request, southwesterly direction, and terminate at the our land. It is only a line of communication may designate or approve for that purpose, 'shali construct and operate a line of railroad and telegraph

little village of Frémont, in Nebraska Terri to bring Minnesota and the extreme Northwest from Sioux City, upon the most direct and practi tory, between the Platte river and the head down into communication with the main line, cable route, to such a point on, and so as to connect waters of the Elkhorn river, a distance in the so as to bring the main trunk at the one hunwith, the Iowa branch of the Union Pacific railroad from Omaha, or the Union Pacific railroad, as such

whole of at least ninety-five miles, forming a sort dredth meridian in communication with the company may select, and on the same terms and of ox-bow; proceeding first to the southeast, 1 point stated in the bill. It never was intended conditions as are provided in this act, and the act to then to the south, and then to the southwest; as a direct line, but, upon a topographical inveswhich this is an amendment, for the construction of the said Union and Pacific railroad and telegraph

and at Frémont they form a connection with the tigation, a route from Sioux City to the one line and branches, and said company shall complete

Omaha branch of the Pacific railroad. When hundredth meridian was regarded as the best the same at the rate of fifty miles per year: Provided, they have reached Frémont, they have made a means to unite the main route with the northThat said Union Pacific Railroad Company shall be, and is hereby, released from the construction of said

westing from the point at which they started, western railroad system. I think I have púrbranch. And said company constructing said branch that is Sioux City, of not quite five miles; and sued the study of the possibilities of railroad shall not be entitled to receive in_bonds an amount the traveler and his freight, in proceeding from lines between the Mississippi valley and my larger than the said Union Pacific Railroad Company would be entitled to receive if it had constructed the

Sioux City to the Omaha branch, has been own coast with as much carefulness, I dare say braoch under this act and the act to which this is an obliged to go at least ninety-five miles in order with more carefulness, than any man I know. amendinent; but said company shall be entitled to to proceed westward five miles. This circuit Mr. HOWARD. I do not know that I under. receive alternate sections of land for ten miles in width on each side of the same along the whole

ous route makes twenty miles of easting into stand the Senator from California very clearly; length of said branch: And provided further, That Iowa, seventy-two miles of southing, and has but if I do, I understand him to say that there if i railroad should not be completed to Sioux City, a length from Sioux City to Frémont of at has been some topographical report on the across Iowa or Minnesota, within eighteen months from the date of this act, then said company desig

least ninety-five miles, as I have already re subject of this branch line. I have never seen nated by the President, as aforesaid, may commence, marked, and in running this distance they get any such report. continue and complete the construction of said branch west of Sioux City only five miles; that is, Mr. McDOUGALL. I will say to the Senas contemplated by the provisions of this act.

they run ninety-five miles in order to get for ator from Michigan that I had, when I first It was under that section that President Lin ward five miles!

came into the House of Representatives, fifty coln made the order designating the Sioux City There is another view of this subject, Mr. manuscript maps of that part of the country, and Pacific Railroad Company as the corpora President, which ought not to be omitted. The besides the surveys of the engineers of the tion to construct the Sioux City branch. Ac Government, by the terms of the amended Pa Government-fifty that I had employed men to cording to the construction which I put upon the cific railroad act of 1864, lends its credit to the || make-and then I understood the country myseventeenth section of the act of 1864, it was company, to the amount of $ 16,000 for each | self by my own personal cognition. I say that this incompetent for the President to make an order | mile, amounting for the whole of this distance, branch was provided for simply to connect the designating any company for the construction calling the distance ninety-five miles - and Northwest, from Lake Superior down through of the Sioux City branch within the eighteen it is certainly, I think, greater than that—to | Minnesota, and join it to the main line commonths which were allowed by this seventeenth $1,520,000. Besides this, the company is to municating with California. That proposition, section. Nor was it competent for him, as I get the land subsidy along the whole of this when presented from the Northwest, met with understand the act, to designate any company ox-bow line of ninety-five miles at the rate of my full approbation, I having carefully studied for the construction of that branch until there twenty sections per mile, amounting in all to the subject. I think the Senator from Michishould be a railroad running through either nine hundred and fifty sections of land, or six gan, who is always careful, and to whose opinthe State of Iowa or the State of Minnesota to hundred and eight thousand acres, worth at ions I always listen with great respect, is a little Sioux City. The object of the Government was the mininum price $760,000.

mistaken, because he has not gone quite far plain, to secure the construction of some rail The committee, after looking this whole sub. || enough west. road through Minnesota or Iowa to Sioux City,ject over and discussing it at several meetings, Mr. GRIMES. The Senator from Michigan 80 az to form a connection at that point with and after hearing men of experience acquainted || is much more familiar with the statutes of the the railroad system extending through Iowa, with that part of the country, who made their United States on the subject of the Pacific railMinnesota, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan, statements on the subject, came to the con road than I am, but I must claim that I am a the purpose being, according to my view of the clusion that the better way was to set aside the little more familiar with the topography of the statute and the policy of Congress at that time, President's order of the 24th of December, | country through which it is proposed to build to establish Sioux City as a kind of central point 1864, and open this subject for competition this branch road than he is. The Senator from at which the railroad system of the northwest between any companies that may see fit to California has very correctly stated what was ern States should form a connection with the compete for it.

it does not belong the purpose of Congress at the time this branch Pacific railroad proper. Nevertheless, upon to me to pass any censure upon the Sioux City was provided for, and the Senator from Michithe application of certain gentlemen connected and Pacific Railroad Company for adopting | gan has correctly stated what is the purpose with the Sioux City Railroad Company, the this course, but I cannot omit to say that I of this bill, namely, to set aside the President's President was induced to make what I regard as regard their conduct in selecting this circuit. || order, to violate, as I apprehend, the contract a premature order in the premises, giving this ous route through Iowa, thus increasing the now existing between the Federal Government privilege to the Sioux City railroad at a period distance for persons connected with the north and the company that was designated by the so early after the passage of the act as to cut western railroads and northwestern transpor President of the United States to build this of all fair and just competition between that tation very considerably, as a plain departure road, and then to allow a competing line to concompany and other companies for the construc from the manifest intent and meaning of the struct a road up the valley of the Niobrara, a tion of this road.

law of 1864. What the northwestern States valley which every gentleman who ever passed It will be observed also that the very lan want particularly is as direct intercommunica- ll through it, so far as I know, beginning with

Of course,

Lieutenant Warren, will admit that it is impos do hereby designate the said Sioux City and Pacific and most practicable route, subject to the future sible that a railroad can be built through.

Railroad Company for the purpose above mentioned. approval of the President of the United States, Mr. SUNNER. Why?

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

instead of leaving it as it now is, according to December 24, 1864. Mr. GRIMES. It cannot be built forthe reason

the position of the Senator from Michigan, on that there is no timber; it goes through what are

Now, Mr. President, it seems to me that there

the map which he has presented to us. We called the bad lands. One half of the country or is no power in Congress to go beyond that act of have, I believe, within a short time organized a large part of the country through it is what

the President; that when he had performed his an engineer board, a kind of Pacific railroad is known as the alkali land, sand-hills, as the duty in designating the company under the law

department, at the head of which I think we Senator from Missouri [Mr. Browx] correctly which sliould be authorized to build the road

have an engineer. These surveys will heresuggests, who has been through that country there was the end of the matter.

after be referred to that officer, and I am conhimself, I think-sand-hills on both sides that Mr. FIENDRICKS. Will the Senator allow tent that the company shall be required to never will admit of any population; and to-day

me to ask him one question, whether this com build the road according to the plans that shall you have not got twenty-five hundred people in pany which has been designated by the Presi

be approved by the Secretary of the Interior, the whole Territory of Dakota through which dent has made surveys and located the road.

and by his engineers and the President of the it is proposed to build it; and if it were built, Has it made any investments ?

United States. let me say it would require as a subsidy--and

Mr. GRIMES. Yes, sir. I say it seems to Mr. HOWARD. I differ from the Senator I think the gentlemen who are upon the Com

me, and I think the Senate must concur with from Iowa as to the true construction of the mittee on the Pacific Railroad will confirm what

me, that there was the end of the matter, and seventeenth section of the act of 1864. Accord1 say-$50,000,000 more than it would to build that there is no power in Congress to overthrow ing to his view, it was competent for the Presthis road. that contract, and that it is a manifest breach

ident at any time after the passage of that act • Mr. CONNESS. Allow me to make an of public faith to attempt to do it. I under

to designate any company he might see fit for inquiry as to the last expression of the Senator take to say that gentlemen who are advocating the construction of the Sioux City branch. It in comparing these two routes, so called. I this measure would not do it for themselves as

does seem to me that the simple reading of the desire to know what he means by this road.'' || private individuals in private transactions.

statute is a full and complete answer to that Does he mean the designated route, the map of

When that order was made by the President,

position. It says that so much of section fourwhich is in the Interior Department?

designating the Pacific and Sioux City com ieen of the originaláct -as relates to the branch Mr. GRIMES. The nearest practical route. pany as the proper corporation to construct this from Sioux City be, and the same is hereby, Mr. CONNESS. I hope the Senator will road, individuals were induced in different sec

amended so as to read," that " whenever a line address himself to that question.

tions of the country to invest their money in of railroad shall be completed through lowa or Mr. GRIMES. I will. The seventeenth sec

the stock ; surveys were made. I do not pre Minnesota to Sioux City,'' the President shall tion of the act which was read by the Senator

tend to say that they have made the best survey have this power of designation; and afterward from Michigan does not in his estimation au

and selected the best line that could have been in a subsequent proviso the section declares thorize the President of the United States to

selected. They thought it was the best one; that this State road shall be completed within designate this company now before us to build

but they have a corps of engineers this moment eighteen months, and if it is not completed this road. Let us look at that section. It reads in the field attempting a better one.

within eighteen months then the company that

Mr. HOWARD. Allow me to ask a quesas follows:

may be designated by the President of the tion. On what route is this corps of engineers “That so much of section fourteen of said act as re

United States may proceed to build this branch. lates to a branch from Sioux City be, and the same is now engaged?

If the language, "whenever a line of railroad hereby, amenderiso as to rend as follows: that when Mr. GRIMES. They are attempting to find shall be completed through the State of Iowa ever a line of railroad shall be completed through the State of Iowa or Minnesota to Sioux City, such com

a route by which they can build their road upon or Minnesota to Sioux City” does not imply pany, now organized or as may hereafter be organized the nearest and most practicable way from until that act is done, until that condition is under the laws of Iowa, Minnesota, Dakota, or No Sioux City to strike the Union Pacific rail complied with by some company, I am unable braska, as the President of the United States, by its

road. request, may designate or approve for that purpose,

That is what they are trying to do. to understand language. It is tantamount to shall construct and operate a line of railroad and The Senator has alluded to the fact that this declaring that after or upon the completion of telegraph from Sioux City, upon the most direct and road from Sioux City runs in an easterly direcpracticable route to such a point on, and so as to

a road to Sioux City through Minnesota or connect with, the Iowa branch of the Union Pa

tion. It runs in an easterly direction from the Iowa, the President may have power to desig, cific railroad from Omaha, or the Union Pacific rail simple fact-I think my colleague has been to nate a company to construct this branch; and road, as such company may select, and on the same Sioux City and knows the topography of that terms and conditions as are provided in this act and

that was manifestly the policy and intention of the act to which this is an amendment, for the con

country—that it is impossible to cross the Mis Congress at the time of passing the act; the struction of the said Union Pacific railroad and tele souri river at Sioux City. There is a rise of object being to secure absolutely and beyond graph line and branches; and said company shall the bluff on the opposite side of several hun. complete the same at the rate of fifty miles per year:

peradventure the construction of a road through Provided, That said Union Pacific Railroad Company

dred feet, so that it is necessary for them to Iowa or through Minnesota to Sioux City, so as shall be, and is hereby, released from the construc cut through the bluff below Sioux City, and to form a connection with the system of railtion of said branch. And said company constructing run in a southeasterly direction for a few miles said branch shall not be entitled to receive in bonds

roads that concentrate at Chicago, and for the an amount larger than the said Union Pacific Rail

until they strike the bottom of the Missouri benefit of the Northwest. road Company would be entitled to receive if it hau river. Perhaps it is not known to the Senator Mr. SUMNER. Do I understand my friend constructed the branch under this act and the act to which this is an amendment; but said company shall

from Michigan that the only place where the to say that President Lincoln transcended his be entitled to receivo alternate sections of land for bluff comes to the Missouri river in the whole

power when he designated this company? ten miles in width on each side of the same along the State of Iowa is at Sioux City.

Mr. HOWARD. I think he did. “I think it whole length of said branch: And provided further, || site side are what are known as the black hills, That if a railroad should not be completed to Sioux

was an inadvertence on his part. He could City, across Iowa or Minnesota, within eighteen

extending down several miles, through which do this only after the completion of a road months from the date of this act, then said company it would be just as impossible to ever construct through Iowa or Minnesota, and not before. designated by the President, as aforesaid”

a railroad that would be a paying road as it He assumed to exercise the power of designaThe Senator infers that the President had not would be to construct one through the White tion before the completion of any such road, .any right until the expiration of those eighteen mountains. But, Mr. President, it is not the and there is no such road in existence. months to designate a company; but that is not purpose of the company that was incorporated The Senator from Iowa seems to insist that the language of the act; that is not the tense under the laws of the State of Iowa to take rights have become vested in the Sioux City in which this section is drawn.

any advantage of the Government. They Railroad Company, and that we cannot now "And provided further, That if a railroad should not desire to build the road upon the nearest and interfere with this order without a violation of be completed to Sioux City, across Iowa or Minne most practicable route; and in order to show vested rights. I do not so understand it. I know sota, within eighteen months from the date of this

that such is their sentiment, and to test the act, then said company designated by the President,

of no right which has accrued to that company. as aforesaid, may commence, continue, and complete sense of the gentlemen who are so anxious to The company have never applied a single dol. the construction of said branch as contemplated by set aside the order designating this company, the provisions of this act.'

lar in the way of constructing this railroad. I propose to amend the bill of the Senator | They have not broken ground; they bave not In accordance with the construction which the President of the United States put upon | enacting clause and inserting the following as from Michigan by striking out all after the chopped down a tree; they have not laid a

tie ; they have not advanced a single dollar that law, and which I apprehend cannot be a substitute:

for the construction of the road. other than the correct construction, he made That the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad Com Mr. MCDOUGALL. The Senator will per. the following order:

pany, designated by the President of the United Whereas the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad ComStates to construct the Sioux City branch of the

mit me to ask him a question. I believe I was Union Pacific railroad, shall construct said branch

earlier on that committee than the Senator Bany, requested the President of the United States to

upon the best, most direct, and practicable route, from Michigan. I ask him whether he is not designate said company"for the purpose of constructsubject to the approval of President of the Uni

aware that the line designed to connect with ing and operating a line of railroad and telegraph

ted States, and to be determined by him on actual from Sioux City to such point on, and so as to consurrey without regard to the line designated upon

Lake Superior by St. Paul and down to Siv ux nect with, the Iowa branch of the Union Pacific rail

the map placed on file by said company in the De City, and thence to the one hundredth meridian, road from Omaha, or the Union Pacific railroad, as partment of the Interior.

was not given a longer time for its construcsuch company may select:"

It will be observed that the proposition I tion than any other line because the country was Therefore be it lonoven, That by the authority conferred upon the President of the United States by the

offer as a substitute for the bill advocated by new? Was it not understood that they would seventeenth section of the act of Congress approved

the Senator from Michigan is that, without any need more time to survey and find out approJuly 2, 1804, entitled "An act to amend an act to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line

regard to the survey to which he has alluded | priate routes ? Then let me ask him further from the Missouri river to the Pacific ocean,' &c., I,

and the map which he has presented to the whether they have not been triangulating the Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, Senate, this road shall be built upon the nearest whole thing from Cedar Falls down to the

On the oppo

junction with the main line at the one hun the valley of the Niobrara it will be found that pose of his amendment, it simply proposes to set dredth meridian. If they have not been doing a railroad is entirely practicable upon that aside the map which has already been filed by 80. I bare been misinformed.

route. There has been, however, no very thor: the Sioux City company, to treat it as a nullity, Mr. HOWARD. I have not the means of ough exploration of the route from the head and to authorize this company hereafter to conassuring the bonorable Senator from California waters of the Niobrara river over to Fort Lar struct this branch wherever they may see fit to whether private companies have been engaged amie. Still the committee were informed by a construct it, by the approbation of the Presiin that enterprise, but I think it is highly proba very intelligent gentleman who had repeatedly | dent, thus leaving in their hands the exclusive ble they have been. Nr. VCDOUGALL. I would ask him, then,

traveled over that part of the route between privilege of constructing the branch, and ex

Laramie and the head waters of the Niobrara, | cluding all other companies from competition whether the location of a road by excellent that in his opinion a railroad was entirely prac.

with it for that privilege. engineers is not the first term in the building ticable between these two points.

Sir, I object to this. It is no remedy for the of a road in a new country, and whether it is I beg to add, for the information of the Sen evils which at present exist. The statute of not one of the most expensive things.

ate, that the Territorial Legislature of Dakota, 1864, in and of itself at the present time, con: Mr. HOWARD. I do not understand that in January, 1865, in a memorial which they tains full authority to the President of the Unithe location of a road, by merely making sur addressed to Congress upon the subject, remon ted States to designate this company or any Feys, constitutes any part of the building of strated very strongly against the construction other company that he may select for the pur. the road.

of the road upon the ox-bow line which has pose of building this branch. The Senator Mr. MCDOUGALL. I ask whether the loca been adopted in the map of the Sioux City || from Iowa tenaciously clings to the privilege tion of a road in a new country is not of as Railroad Company. They use this language : which he seems to tbink has already been acmuch importance to the construction of the

“We are also informed that there is some talk of quired by this company. I wish to disengage road as its grade or the putting on the track, a route down the valley of the Missouri river, to its grasp upon this privilege. Without intendwhen coinpleted, of engines; whether it is not unite with the Central or Iowa branch of the Pacific

ing to cast any reflection whatever on the charmore important that the engineers should first

railroad at or near the mouth of the Elkhorn, a trib-
utary of the Platte river.”

acter of the gentlemen connected with the locate a route.

That is the route now under discussion.

company, I must repeat that I cannot but regard Mr. HOWARD. I hardly think the Senator

the route adopted by them, running, as it does, from California will insist on an elaborate an "Such a route would run about south from Sioux

a circuitous route to the southeast, then to the swer to that question. The honorable Senator

City for nearly one hundred and fifty miles. This
would necessitate all the above roads (referring to

south, then to the southwest, through a large from lowa states to the Senate that a route up the roads coming from Minnesota and Wisconsin and portion of the State of Iowa, and terminating the valley of the Niobrara river is impracticable Illinois) to run at least two hundred miles out of upon the Omaha branch at Frémont, thus adand impossible on account of the want of tim

the most direct route by the way of the Niobrara val-
ley. That is to say, when the roads are completed it

vancing to the west only five miles at the ber and the general dilliculty of the route. It would necessitate the business on these four roads to utmost from the point of beginning, as a very is very true, as I have been informed, that a travel at least two hundred miles further to reach the passes in the Rocky mountains than would be

plain departure, as an evasion of the plain company has been formed in Dakota Territory necessary should that Sioux City branch run up the

intent and meaning of the statute of 1864; and that has in view a competition for the construc Niobrara valley or by the way direct from Chicago. for one I cannot consent that a company who tion of this branch. Whether that company

It needs no argument to prove that such a route has resorted to such a course shall continue to

would not be of any practical value or importance will proceed, in case it becomes designated whatever to those roads. The only one that would

grasp the privilege it seeks to enjoy. I think under the act of 1864, to construct a road up in the slightest degree be benefited by such a-diver we ought to unclasp that grip if it be possible. the valley of the Niobrara, is more than I am

sion of that branch would be the aforesaid road via Mr. CONNESS. I will not detain the Senable to say. I am not here as the advocate of

Dubuque, known as the Dubuque and Sioux City
railroad. But we do most earnestly protest against

ate long in what I shall have to say on this subthe Niobrara route, but I must say that in my e policy which would favor that or any other of these ject, and will endeavor to make myself as well judgment the Senator from Iowa has been roads at the expense of all the others, as that sup understood as possible. The subject-matter of greatly misinformed as to the character of that posed sauth route assuredly would.'

this bill and the question to which it relates route. If that route were adopted, the branch The Legislature of Minnesota during the received more continuous consideration from would commence at Sioux City, running up the

same winter also remonstrated against the the Pacific Railroad Committee of this body valley of the Niobrara for a distance of about adoption of this ox-bow route. They observe, than perhaps any other single question that has two hundred and sixty miles, and would then in their preamble and resolutions:

ever been referred to that committee. Parties pass off toward the southwest and terminate “Whereas by several acts of Congress liberal grants interested on both sides of the question were probably at Fort Laramie, there forming a of public lands have been made for the construction

heard at many successive meetings. They were of a railroad from the head of Lake Superior southjunction with the Union Pacific railroad proper. westerly via St. Paul to a point on the western

heard chiefly on the question of routes-the As to the character of this route I beg leave en boundary of Iowa, at or near the parallel of forty relative advantage of one route as against the passant to say that so far as I have been able two and a half degrees of north latitude, intersecting in its passage a railroad running westwardly froin

others. This company that the President of to acquire information on the subject, I am Winona, and another running up the valley of the

the United States has designated, as has been compelled to differ very widely from the opin Root river, in Minnesota, and one from McGregor, in stated by the Senator from Iowa, lias been ion formed of it by the Senator from Iowa. I Iowa, and connecting with the North or Sioux City

organized and issued stock and taken steps of branch of the Pacific railroad at the above point; have read with a good deal of care a report that southwestern road operating as a main trunk to

that kind, a disturbance to which would lead made by a Mr. Sawyer in 1865 of his explora all the others; and whereas the best interests of all to a great deal of injury to private parties. I tions for a wagon road up that valley, and from

of those roads, as well as of the country through which wish to disabuse the mind of the Senate upon

they run, and the whole region of country westwardly the head waters of the Niobrara to Virginia thereof, require and demand that that branch should

that point.

This company is an organization Cits, in Montana Territory. This exploration run westwardly on the nearest, most direct, and most of other railroad companies running through was made in the summer of 1865. Of course practicable route to unite with the main trunk in the

the State of Iowa, and perhaps Wisconsin and neighborhood of Fort Lara .le; and whereas a diverit will not be possible for me to read more than sion of that branch from that route to the Platte val

contiguous States. They organized together to very short extracts from it. He started to make ley route, therehy increasing very materially the dis construct this branch for the purpose of giving

tance, will be destructiveof the best interests of those bisexplorations from Sioux City; he proceeded

a western connection to all their roads with the roads and the country through which they run, as up the valley of the Niobrara a distance of two also a palpable violation of the spirit and evident

Union Pacific Railroad Company. The act of hundred and sixty-five miles, and then passed intention of the law creating that branch: Therefore, 1864 has been read from. The seventeenth off further to the northwest on his way to Vir

Resolved. That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be requested to use their best efforts and

section of that act gives authority to the Presginia City, wbich was the terminus of his explo influence to secure the location of said branch west

ident to make the designation of a company for ration, for the purpose of establishing the route wardly, as near as may be along the parallel of forty: || building this branch, and such authority is to of that wagon road. Ile says in his report:

two and a half degrees of north latitude to a point of be found nowhere else. I will read from it a

junction with the main trunk, and so as in the most "Accompanying the expedition were five emigrant effectual manner to promote the best interests of all very few lines; it provides thatteams and a private freighttrain of thirty-six wagons, those roads and of the country through which they “Wbenever a line of railroad shall be completed coupled together so as to be drawn by eighteen teams pass.

through the State of Iowa or Minnesota to Sioux of six yoke of oxen each, and heavily loaded, some Resolved, That they protest against and use their tearns being loaded with sixty-four hundred pounds;

City, such company, now organized or as may hereinfluence to prevent that branch from being diverted and here perinit me to say that the entire practica

after be organized under the laws of Iowa, Minnedown the valley of the Missouri river to unite with bility of the route traveled over may be seon when I

sota, Dakota, or Nebraska, as the President of tho the Platto valley route.

United States, by its request, may designate or apglate that not one of these wagons were uncoupled during the journey for the passage of any obstacle in I have, I believe, presented to the Senate all prove for that purpose,shallconstruct and operato' the road."

the material facts connected with this bill. The this branch of the Pacific railroad. This act On reading the report you will be struck, sir, committee had it under consideration at sev was passed in 1864, nearly two years since, but with this fact, that the valley of the Niobrara eral meetings; they listened to the statements the connection predicated in this section has river, so far as he explored and examined it, of many very intelligent gentlemen connected never yet been made. No line of railr vad has is found to be well provided with timber, with with these various routes; they examined the yet reached Sioux City. I ask the Senator water, and with grass. In a letter which Mr. law as carefully as they were able, and they | from Iowa whether I am correct in stating that Sawyer wroteonly a short time since, remarking came to the conclusion that the best course to no line of railroad has yet reached Sioux City upon the character of that valley, he says: be adopted was to set aside the order of the from the east.

"I should think from my observations and from President of December 24, 1864, and thus to Mr. GRIMES. None, sir. those of my surveyors that a railroad might be con leave the whole subject open to fair and hon Mr. CONNESS. Very well. The Senator structed up the Niobrara to Laramie at a reasonable

orable competition between the railroad com calls my attention to another provision in this cet per mile: there no rangeof mountains to cross, and the excavation and embankinent would be about panies that might see fit to compete for the section which I desire to read, for I wish it the same as upon roads in Iowa and Illinois." privilege of constructing this branch.

distinctly understood that I have no interest in I have no doubt that upon a more complete The Senator from Iowa proposes to amend this case; I sat in the committee as a juror and and thorough exploration of the country through I the bill; and if I understand the drift and pur heard all that was said. The second proviso

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