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JUDGES OF THE DISTRICT COURTS

AT THE PRESENT TIME (NOVEMBER, 1912).

9.

Dist.

Residence. 1...... Hon. JAMES H. WENDORFF.....

Leavenworth. 2... HON. WILLIAM A. JACKSON..

Atchison. 3. Div. No. 1, HON. ALSTON W. DANA.

Topeka. Div. No. 2, HON. GEORGE H. WHITCOMB.... Topeka. 4. .. Hon. CHARLES A. SMART..

Ottawa. 5.. HON. FREDERICK A. MECKEL.

Emporia. 6.... HON. JOHN C. CANNON.

Mound City. 7..... HON. JAMES W. FINLEY

Chanute.
8.
HON. ROSWELL L. KING.

Marion,
HON. CHARLES E. BRANINE.

Hutchinson. 10. HON. JABEZ O. RANKIN....

15......

Paola. 11. .. Hon. EDWARD E. SAPP..

Galena, 12. HON. JOHN C. HOGIN.

Belleville. 13...... Hon. GRANVILLE P. AIKMAN.

El Dorado. 14...... HON. THOMAS J. FLANNELLY.

Independence. HON, RICHARD M. PICKLER..

Smith Center. 16..... HON. ELMER C. CLARK.

Parsons. 17. HON. W. S. LANGMADE.

Oberlin. 18. Div. No. 1, HON. THOMAS C. WILSON

Wichita. Div. No. 2, Hon. THORNTON W. SARGENT.. Wichita. 19...... HON. CARROLL L. SWARTS.

Winfield. 20...... HON. DANIEL A. BANTA..

Great Bend. 21:..... Hon. SAM KIMBLE

Manhattan. 22... HON. WILLIAM I. STUART.

Troy.
23
HON. JACOB C. RUPPENTHAL.

Russell.
HON. PRESTON B. GILLETT.

Kingman.
Div. No. 1, Hon. EDWARD L. FISCHER Kansas City.
Div. No. 2, Hon. F. D. HUTCHINGS.

Kansas City. 30. HON. DALLAS GROVER

Ellsworth. HON. GORDON L. FINLEY

Dodge City. HON. WILLIAM H. THOMPSON.

Garden City. 33. HON. ALBERT S. FOULKS.

Ness City. 34. HON. CHARLES W. SMITH.

Stockton.
HON. ROBERT C. HEIZER.

Osage City. 86...... Hon. OSCAR RAINES...

Oskaloosa. 37. HON, OSCAR FOUST

lola. 88. ..... HON. ANDREW J. CURRAN.

Pittsburg.

24...... 29......

31.

82......

85......

JUDGE OF THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF WYANDOTTE COUNTY,

HON. HUGH J. SMITH, Argentine.

OFFICERS OF UNITED STATES COURTS,

DISTRICT OF KANSAS.

JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS: HON. WILLIAM C. HOOK......... Leavenworth.

JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT :
HON. JOHN C. POLLOCK.... ... Kansas City, Kan.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY:
HON. HARRY J. BONE.... . . Ashland.

MARSHAL:
HON. JOHN R. HARRISON ........ Salina.

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT: MORTON ALBAUGH

..Topeka.

The terms of the DISTRICT COURT are held as follow:

FIRST DIVISION: At Topeka, on the second Monday of April; at Leavenworth, on the second Monday of October; at Kansas City, on the second Monday of January and the first Monday of October (no jury in October); at Salina (by consent or special order), on the second Monday of May.

SECOND DIVISION: At Wichita, on the second Monday of March and the second Monday of September.

THIRD DIVISION: At Fort Scott, on the first Monday of May and the second Monday of November.

* Clerk's office, first division, at Topeka ; second division, at Wichita; third division, at Fort Scott.

NOTE.- The United States Circuit Courts were abolished by act of Congress, January 1, 1912.

IN MEMORIAM.

JUSTICE CHARLES BURLEIGH GRAVES.

At the October, 1912, session of this court the following tributes were paid to the memory of Honorable CHARLES BURLEIGH GRAVES, deceased. The biographical sketch was contributed by Oscar L. Moore, the reporter of the court, who spoke as follows:

May it Please the Court: Judge CHARLES BURLEIGH GRAVES, who served as a Justice of this court from August, 1905, until January, 1911, after an illness of more than one year died at his home in Emporia on the 25th day of March, 1912.

Judge GRAVES was born in Wayne county, Indiana, on November 13, 1841. When ten years of age he moved with his parents to Fulton county, Illinois. In 1859 he, with his father's family, came from Illinois to Kansas and settled in Woodson county. On November 15, 1861, he enlisted in Captain Goss's company of the Iola battalion of “Home Guards." This company was recruited for the purpose of protecting the southern frontiers of Kansas against the merciless savages and inhuman bushwhackers infesting that portion of the state. The company was not immediately mustered into the service, but, furnishing its own subsistence, clothing and accouterments, it went into winter quarters at Iola, where it performed all the duties of regular soldiers, scouting, skirmishing, picketing and patrolling the country in all directions. The boys were often so destitute of things necessary for such service that those going on duty borrowed clothing, guns and ammunition from those remaining in camp. On January 16, 1862, Judge GRAVES, with his company, was regularly mustered into the service of the United States. The company was designated company F and assigned to the Ninth Kansas cavalry.

Judge GRAVES served three years and three months in the army. The nature of his army service is best told by himself in a letter written, by request, to be read at an annual reunion of the Graves family at Richmond, Ind., in 1900. He said:

“My service was in Kansas, Missouri, Indian Territory and Arkansas. My experiences were so similar to that of all other western soldiers that it will not be necessary to go into detail in that respect. I was never in the hospital or guardhouse. I was never in what might be called a great battle. Our service consisted of scouting, skirmishing, foraging, running after bushwhackers, guarding supply trains, and similar service. The hardest experience I had was on a race after some (of Quantrill's) guerillas in Missouri, where we were in the saddle continuously, with the exception of one hour at noon of each day, for five days and nights, and then gave up the chase."

In this same letter to the Graves family reunion he wrote a few simple words, which reveal such clear conception of the

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effects of modern progress that I desire to place them of permanent record in this sketch. After reviewing many incidents and events of his early life in Indiana, he said:

“As I look back over the fifty years of life since I left where I was born, it seems to me that there was more real satisfaction in life, more hearty, robust good-fellowship, more open, unselfish hospitality among the people then than now. Now people have more than they had then. They dress better, have betterfurnished homes, worship in more pretentious churches, do not work so hard, read more, are better educated, and in many respects are superior to their ancestors; but at the same time they are more selfish, less considerate of the poor, the sick and the distressed; their religion is more like a new gown, worn upon special occasions for the sake of appearances rather than for the continuous practice of its virtues. More attention is given to money-getting, and more importance attached to things that money will buy. The old-fashioned friendly visit has degenerated into the cold and formal call. Our nearest neighbors sicken and die, and we first know of it when we see the hearse at the door. We are too busy to think of anything but our own business.”

After returning from the army Judge GRAVES engaged in farming and the milling and lumber business until 1868, when he began reading law in the office of Judge H. H. Bent, at Burlington. He was admitted to practice at Burlington in 1869, and began the practice at Neosho Falls. In 1872 he became a member of the law firm of Talbot, Talbot & Graves. In 1875 he moved to Burlington and formed a partnership with one Silas Fearl. In 1876 he was elected county attorney of Coffey county and served two terms. In 1880 he was elected judge of the fifth judicial district, composed of Lyon, Osage, Coffey and Chase counties, and served for three terms, his first term commencing in January, 1881, and his last term ending in January, 1893. In March, 1883, he moved to Emporia.

After his retirement from the district judgeship he became a member of the firm of Graves, Lambert & Dickson, at Emporia. Later the firm became Graves & Dickson, and upon the death of Judge Dickson the firm became Graves & Hamer.

Upon the death of Justice E. W. CUNNINGHAM, in August, 1905, Governor Hoch appointed Judge GRAVES one of the justices of this court. He was elected at the regular election in 1906 and served until January, 1911.

Judge GRAVES was a devoted member of the Masonic Fraternity, and attained to some of the higher degrees of that order. He was a loyal member of the Grand Army of the Republic and was often prominent in its councils and deliberations.

In 1872 he was married to Miss Hattie S. Hawkins, of Woodson county. To them four sons and two daughters were born, all of whom are grown. His wife and children all survive him.

I wish to pay my personal testimonial of respect to the memory of Judge GRAVES. From a familiar acquaintance of nearly a quarter of a century, during which I often enjoyed close relations with him in the lodge room, in the post room and in the court room, I learned to know his superior intellectual qualities and his sterling worth. He was a strong and forceful character, faithful and diligent in all works for the uplifting of his fellow men, loyally devoted to his country in peace as well as in war. In his chosen profession he was a hard worker, giving to every case the best of his skill and labor. As a judge he was quick of apprehension, clear, methodical and logical in his analysis and statement of propositions of law and fact.

Judge GRAVES honorably filled his own place both in public and private life, fearlessly, faithfully and nobly discharging every trust, and left behind an imperishable name to illumine the annals of his state and nation.

He fell asleep
March twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred and twelve,

at his home in Emporia, Kan. Mr. Justice MASON, on behalf of the Court, then said:

To speak with confidence of a man's whole life from an association with him for some five years in an official capacity may seem presumptuous. But to be thrown daily for that period into close contact with another, in a pursuit to which he gives the best effort of his being, is to see something of every side of his character. If one who served with Judge GRAVES while he was a justice of the supreme court has not a just conception of him as a man and as a citizen, as well as a lawyer and a judge, it is not for a want of opportunity for observation. In fiction and in tradition, perhaps in history, men are found whose public career seems inconsistent with the traits they disclose in private; who are one thing while they are at work and another during relaxation; who present one aspect to business associates and another to their personal intimates. But in everyday' experience, a serious, sober-minded man, such as our friend was, puts the whole of himself into his daily work, and finds there field for the expression of every phase of his nature. To be with him in his daily work was to know him, and to know him was to cherish his friendship.

His death removed one of the comparatively few left to us whose activities link the Kansas of yesterday with that of to-day. He bore a conspicuous part in the upbuilding of the state in times of hardship and privation, and a no less important part in meeting the different and more complicated problems in later times of material prosperity. He enjoyed the rare privilege of being intimately connected with the founding of a commonwealth, and the added privilege of bearing a large share in the later shaping of its destiny.

His character, in which there was much of the stern Puritan, was peculiarly fitted to meet and overcome the difficulties of a new country. Practical, shrewd, resourceful, self-reliant, independent, courageous, he was of the type of which pioneers are made. These qualities fitted him not only for the struggle with the forces of nature incident to the wresting of a domain from the wilderness, but as well for that fiercer conflict in which were arrayed the forces of freedom and slavery. His own story of just how he reached the determination to enlist as a soldier in the Union army, told in moments of rare intimacy, throws a light not only upon his own character, but upon that of the ancestry from which he sprung. A mere boy at the outbreak of the war, he was revolving in his mind his own duty in the matter. His impulse to offer his services to his country was restrained only by one reflection-how would his peace-loving

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