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"The King seemed to enter with much feeling into some portions of this address, and at its close shook me most cordially by the hand. This will illustrate the feelings he has regarding the sacred volume ; and I trust it will quicken the sentiment of devotion with which we as Christians should implore the Divine blessing upon him, and that, in the language of this Resolution, ‘he may wear his crown with wisdom, and in peace and prosperity, until he obtains an incorruptible crown in the Kingdom of Heaven.'-His Lordship then resumed his seat.”-Commercial Gazette, 7th October.

ERECTION OF MEMORIAL CHURCHES IN ANTANANARIVO. The Directors of the Society are devoutly thankful that their Appeal for funds to secure the erection of four Christian sanctuaries on the several sites where the martyrs of Madagascar nobly died for the faith of Christ, has been answered with promptitude and generosity. Already more than half the amount of the expected expenditure has been realized, and this under the pressure of the unprecedented claims from the multitudes of our suffering countrymen in the cotton districts. These liberal contributions have, however, been made by the few, and the Directors trust that when the season arrives which will admit of a General Appeal to the Churches and Congregations connected with the Society, the other moiety will be cheerfully contributed.

The necessity of these erections will be seen in the intelligence from Madagascar contained in our present Number, in which Mr. Ellis repeats his former statements of the crowded assemblies that gather every Sabbath day in frail and inconvenient buildings, to hear the Word of God, and to celebrate the Ordinances of the Saviour.

The necessity also of an Appeal to British benevolence for the means to build these Churches will be self-evident to all who consider the extreme poverty and almost utter destitution of the great majority of the Native Christians. It will be remembered that in the years of persecution whatever property they possessed was forfeited to the Queen, if they were detected in any act of Christian worship; while the spies and informers by whom they were accused received their recompense also from the possessions of their victims. Thus they were robbed, peeled, and spoiled by their adversaries, and an illustration of many similar cases is given in the following words of one of the Christian refugees :

“ They sent officers and many besides to take me up, and they took all the people they found in my house, and my wife Rabodo also. My children, servants, and everything I had in my house they took away as a forfeit to the Queen. They bound my wife Rabodo, and flogged her from morning until night to make her tell who were her companions. She fainted, and they left her to recover a little, and then flogged her again. But she refused to give up the names of any, so that they were astonished, and said, ' She is a Christian indeed.' Failing to get her to tell

who were her associates, they put a heavy iron ring round her neck and round each ankle. They also fastened these rings together by heavy iron chains from the neck to the ankles, and then bound her to four more Christians. Five others were also bound together, and there was a third party of sixteen also bound together. Every Sabbath day, for seven months, they placed these three parties before the people, that they might see how they were punished for keeping holy the Lord's day. At the end of the seven months they separated them, and sent them into different parts of the country. My wife, Rabodo, was among those they sent to the west. She was left in bonds, and died on the 4th of March, 1859. Yes, she died in her chains, her works follow her. They pursued me for four years and three months, seeking to put me to death. But the Lord watches over the afflicted, and will not give the enemy to rejoice over them. My children they have sold into slavery, and my property they have taken, so that I have now no house to dwell in or land to live upon.

The writer of this letter is one of the most effective Native Pastors at the capital, but it is obvious that he and others of his fellow sufferers have no means of providing suitable places of worship; and surely they will not appeal for help to the Christians of Britain who enjoy liberty, peace, and abundance, and ask in vain!

The Bishop of Mauritius in his journal gives the following testimony to the poverty of the Native Christians, and expresses his earnest hope that the liberality of British Christians will secure for them capacious and appropriate edifices in which they may assemble for divine worship.

“The congregations have so long been in a state of extreme depression as to worldly circumstances, and so many of their members have so recently been delivered from persecution and imminent danger of death, that they are not able to do this of themselves, and it is to be hoped that there will be no difficulty on the part of friends and brethren at home in showing their practical sympathy with the survivors of such devoted servants of Christ, by giving gladly of their substance to belp them.”

Mr. Ellis, in his earnest appeal for help in this important case, observes, The Christians here will do all they can, although twenty-six years of spoliation and suffering have greatly reduced their means. But they are willing, and will, I have no doubt, as far as they are able, render effectual aid in promoting the evangelization of Madagascar.

In his last letter, Mr. E. renews his appeal for funds to carry out this great work, which the Native Christians, from their deep poverty, are unable to accomplish; and we feel assured that these united testimonies must excite the spontaneous generosity of our friends throughout the country.

CONTRIBUTIONS IN AID OF THE ERECTION OF MEMORIAL CHURCHES

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Henry Hopkins, Esq., Hobart Town
Ebenezer Herne, Esq.
Henry Lee, Esq., Manchester £50 for each of the four Memorial
Henry Reed, Esq., Tonbridge Wells

Churches
Thomas Barnes, Esq., M.P., Bolton
Edward Baxter, Esq., Dundee
William Boult, Esq., Bristol
P. W. Cobb, Esq., Margate
T. M. Coombs, Esq.
4. H. Cowie, Esq., Birkenhead
William Crossfield, Esq., Liverpool
Messrs. J. Crossley and Sons, Halifax .
Roger Canliffe, Esq.
Charles Curling, Esq.
Joseph East, Esq.
William Edgar, Esq.
William French, Esq.
John Getty, Esq., per Rev. Dr. Morgan, Belfast
George Hadfield, Esq., M.P., Manchester
James Kershaw, Esq., M.P.
Samuel Morley, Esq.
Isaac Perry, Esq., Chelmsford
Titus Salt. Esq., Bradford .
James Sidebottom, Esq., Manchester
Henry Spicer, Esq.
W. R. Spicer, Esq.
James Spicer, Esq.
Eusebius Smith, Esq.
Thomas Spalding, Esq.
J. K. Welch, Esq.
W.C. Wells, Esq., Chelmsford
W. D. Wills, Esq., Bristol
H. O. Wills, Esq., Bristol
Joshua Wilson, Esq., Tonbridge Wells
A Friend, G.
A Friend, S.
William Edwards, Esq.
Miss Ferguson, Irvine
W. Fox, Esq., Atherstone
Travers Buston, Esq.

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Potto Brown, Esq., Houghton
C. Jupe, Esq., Mere
Henry Rutt, Esq.
James Townley, Esq.
Henry Wright, Esq.
Rev. T. C. Hine and Friends, Sydenham
Miss Cooper
T. Coote, Esq., Fenstanton
H. W. Dobell, Esq.
W. M. Newton, Esq.
T. Crowley, Esq., Birmingham
John Dawson, Esq.
Miss Hall, Walthamstow
Charles Roberts, Esq.
Sir C. E. Eardley, Bart.
J. Green, Esq.
M. Prentice, Esq., Stowmarket
Isaiah Jupe, Esq., Mere
The late Mr. J. W. Porter, Braintree
John Labouchere, Esq.
Joseph Wontner, Esq.
Dr. Conquest.
Ambrose Emerson, Esq.
Dr. W. Cooke
Daniel Ginger, Esq.
Miss Waitridge, Oswestry
A Friend, Dundee
A. Mirrielees, Esq.
A. Morrison, Esq., Cheshunt
Mrs. Fuller Maitland .
William Morris, Esq.
S. Saddington, jun., Esq.
Misses Hamilton, Belfast
Mrs. Lacon, Wem
J. Wemyss, Esq., and Mrs. Wemyss, Fraserburgh
A. C. Collins, Esq., Byfleet
Miss Alers Hankey
Rev. John Olive, Rector of Welwyn
Rev. John Owen, Vicar of Thrussington
Mrs. Parnell, Weston-super-Mare
Rev. F. Soden and Friends
Miss Stapler
Mr. and Mrs. Teversham

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INTERIOR OF SOUTH AFRICA.

DEATH OF MRS. THOMAS.

It is now about four and a half years since the Rev. Thos. Thomas and Mrs. Thomas, accompanied by three other young Missionaries and their wives, left England to proceed to Central South Africa. The Mission amongst the Matebele was actually commenced about the month of October 1859, and since that time Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have borne an active and zealous part in the work, which in its present elementary stage has involved no little difficulty and trial.

It is with much concern we have to announce the death of Mrs. Thomas from the effect of fever, superinduced by a severe cold, together with that of her infant, leaving her husband and two little boys to lament their irreparable loss. Mrs. Thomas entered into the joy of her Lord on the 10th of June ult., having survived her infant only three days.

In a letter referring to the death of his pious and devoted wife, Mr. Thomas observes :

“As in health and strength, so also, when afflicted and about to bid an eternal farewell to this earthly scene, she was perfectly calm and fearless, and seemed to have no misgivings as to how it might be with her beyond death.

* Indeed, from her prayers and her praises, as well as from her remarks to us during her short but very severe illness, we may unhesitatingly conelade that she has had an abundant entrance into the kingdom of her Lord and Saviour.”

Mr. Thomas expresses his grateful sense of the kindness and attention he had received from his fellow-labourers, Mr. and Mrs. Sykes during the period of his heavy trial.

BERBICE.

DEATH OF MRS. RAIN. Br the last West India mail we received the painful intelligence of the death of the truly estimable wife of the Rey. Thomas Rain, of Brunswick, Berbice. So recently as October 1861, Mrs. Rain, in company with her husband, left England to proceed to Berbice, and it was in her heart to bave spent years of devoted labour for the spiritual benefit of the female population of that colony; but in the all-wise but mysterious arrangements of Divine Providence, it has been ordered otherwise. After a brief but severe attack of illness, Mrs. Rain was called to her rest and reward on the 15th November. We deeply sympathize with her bereaved husband, and trust he may be graciously supported and consoled under this deeply afflictive dispensation.

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