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Pliny's Letters, 246.
Polycarp, Ep., to the Philipians, 97,
165, 325.

Quien Le, on Eutychius of Alexan-
dria, 188.


Ranke's Hist. of Popes, 229.
Recorder Episc., 237.
Rehkopf. Vit. Patriarch Alex., 188.
Reland, Antiq. Sac. Vet. Heb., 414.
Renandot. Hist. Patriarch Alex,188.
Rheinwald, Kirchliche Archäologic,
124, 163, 269.
Riddle's Christian Antiquities, 68,
70, 97, 99, 163, 165, 347.

Chronology, 51, 72, 74, 79, 82,
109, 267, 349.
Rigaltius, 138.
Röhr's Kritischen Predigenbiblio-
thek, 56.

Rothe, Die Anfänge der Christlichen
Kirche, Vol. I, 25, 42, 43, 46, 57,
58, 59, 124, 131, 136, 142, 147, 152,
155, 180, 198, 392.

S

Sack, Comment. Theolog. Inst., 36.
Salvianus, 304.
Schoene,Geschichtsforschungen der
Kirchlichen Gebrauchen und Ein-

richtungen Christen, 28, 131, 205,
207, 208, 251, 340, 350.
Schroeter Klein, und Für Christen-
thum Oppositionschrift, 1v., 28.
Schoetgen, Horae. Heb., 158, 160.
Scholiast, Greek, 223.
Schroekhs, Kirch. Gesch., 308.
Scriptores Ecclesiastici, De Musica,

376.

Selden, Origines et Romae,cited,187.
Semisch, C. on Justin, 339.
Severus, Alex., 67.

Sidonius Apollinar., 74, 76, 77, 303.
Siegel, Handbuch der Christlich-
Kirchlichen Alterthümen, 4 Bde.
28, 124, 251, 269, 276, 277, 281,
411.

Simonis, Vorlesungen über Christ.
Alterthum., 79.
Siricius, Ep. ad Himer., 72.
Smyth on Presbytery and Prelacy,
177.

Pres. Repub., 234, 263, 274,
278, 318.

Apostolical Succession, 131,

192.

Presbytery and not Prelacy,
130, 131, 155, 192.
Socrates' History of the Church, 32,
50, 68, 209, 233, 299, 401.
Sozomen, Eccl. History, 68, 208, 209,
284, 238, 293, 382.

Spectator, Christian, 192.
Spittlers' Canon Recht., 31, 251, 255,
267.

Stillingfleet's Irenicum, 192, 193,204.
Suicer, on χειροτονέω, 64.
Thesaur., 256.

Sulpitius,Severus, Vit. e. Martini, 68.
Symmachus, Ep., 76.
Synessii, Ep. 74, 163

T

Talmud, Jerusalem, 160.
Tertullian's Apology, 66, 98, 173,
Tarracon, Conc., 251.
343,344, 345,365, 392. De Poenit.,
104. De Pudicit., 99, De Fuga, 112
Ad Castitat., 112, 256. De Jejun.,
115. De Anima, 365. De Corona,
174. De Bapt., 174, 337. De Prae-
scrip., 255. De Monog., 256. De
Theodoret. Eccl. History, 68, 208,
Oratione, 326, 327.
221, 369, 382.
Theodorus Mopsues, 369.
Theodosian, Codex, 284, 288, 299.
Tindal, on Acts 14: 24, 64.
Thomas de Jesu, 384.
Toletum, Conc. 303.

Tracts for the Times, 122, 348, 350.
Tyndale, on Acts 14: 24, 64.
Trajan's Epistle, 365.
Usher, Archbishop, 192, 225.
Urban II, Pope, 224.
Valentinian III, 77.
Valesius in Euseb., 293.
Vaters and Henke, Allgem. Kirch.
Gesch., 267.

Venema, Institutiones Hist. Eccles.

119.

Vitringa, De Synagoga Vetere, 4to.,
40, 45, 46, 158, 225, 409, 414.

W
Waddington's Church Hist., 165.
Wake, Bishop, on Clem. Ep.ad Cor.,
65.

Walch, De Hymnis Eccl. Apost.,

363; Hist. der Päpste, 402.
Whately's Errors of Romanism, 356,

360.

Kingdom of Christ, 43, 52,
161, 196.
Whittaker, 192.

Wiseman, Dr. on the Tractarian
movement, 360.

Witsius, De Oratione, 350.
Xenophon's Memorabilia, 134.
Ziegler's Versuch der Kirchlichen
Verfassungsformen, 124, 250, 254,
281, 291, 307, 309, 310.
Zunz, Die Gottesdienstlichen Vor-
träge der Juden., 160.

GENERAL INDEX.

A.

Admission to the church, mode of, 113

"Αγγελος τῆς εκκλησίας, 157,159

Alexandria mother church, 251
Ambrose chosen bishop, 68, 73
Angel of churches supposed bishop, 144;
not bishop, 157-161

Antioch, Council of, 63, 74, 276, 278, 290
Antistes, antistes sacrorum, 163
Apollos not ordained, 142
Apostles, shun the distinctions of rank,

30; disown Episcopal power, 31, 146;
brotherly salutations, 33; remonstrate
with the church, and address them as
independent fraternity, 33-35, 38; do
not baptize, 137; their oversight of the
churches, 150; govern them collect-
ively, 151

Apostolical succession, origin of, 296;
derived from Romish church, 311
Archer's Speech, 277
Αρχοντες εκκλησιῶν, 163
Aristocracy in elections, 76; govern the
church, 77; rise in the church, 247-
252; conventional, unauthorized, 250
Auretius, reader, 71

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B.

Baptism by presbyters, 137
Barnabas the Evangelist, 159
Basilinopolis, 251

Benediction, origin and import of the
rite, 403; Aaronitic, 411; apostolical,
entirely unlike the benediction of the
Jewish priesthood, and that of prelacy,
412-414; mode of administering the
rite, 413; abuses of it, 415-422
Bengel, on the angel of the church, 161
Bible, a republican book, 240
withheld from the laity, 287
Bingham, on elections, 68
Bishops, their office, 36; their election
resisted, 73; not distinguished from
presbyters, 125; proof, 126, 163; plu-
rality of, inadmissible, 127, 128; never
confounded with apostles or deacons,
130; derived from Greek, 131; titles
interchanged with presbyters, 126,163;
their qualifications, 131; duties the
same as those of presbyters; but one

;

in a diocese, 123, 134; no official title
in the Scriptures, 145-161; not supe-
rior in rank to presbyters, 145, seq.;
according to Clement, 164; to Poly-
carp, 165; to Justin Martyr, 167; to
Irenaeus, 169; to Clement of Alexan-
dria, 172; to Tertullian, 173; merely
presbyters, 197; pastors only of single
parishes, 200; a bishop's charge origi-
nally a single congregation, 200, 201
admitted by Episcopalians, 201, 202;
all met for worship in the same place,
203, 204; personally known to their
bishop, 204, 205; limited in extent,
205; bishop in country towns, 206-
209; vast multitudes of them, 207,208,
note; ascendency of city bishops,252;
identical in rank with presbyters, ac-
cording to Jerome, 214-218; to Au-
gustin, 218; to Chrysostom, 219, 220;
to Theodoret, 221, 222; to the Greek
scholiast, 222, 223; to Elias, archbp.
of Crete, and to Gregory Nazienzen,
to Isidorus Hispalensis, 223; to Ber-
naldus Constantiensis, to pope Urban,
to Gratian, to Nicholas Tudeschus,224;
to J. P. Launcelot, and to Gieseler, 225;
origin of their distinction from presby-
ters, causes of their increasing ascen-
dency, 254-257; called priests, 257;
their authority yielded by silent con-
sent, 258; mildly exercised at first,259;
authority increased by councils, 267:
bishops in the city, their pre-eminence
272; tyranny over the clergy, 274;
hold the revenues of the church, 276;
power over the clergy; 278; vast ac-
cumulation of their wealth,285: means
of carrying their measures, 290; divine
rights of, 295-298; their intolerance,
290; their pride, 301; their ignorance,

303

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Catholics, multitude of their bishops,

207

Chalcedon, council, 69
Chorepiscopus. 251

Christ, his example, 30; his instructions,
29; his spirit,29; worshipped as divine
in primitive psalmody, 365 366
Christianity, rapid spread of 246; suffers
no alliance with the state, 306
Christians, styled Jews, 40
Chrysostom chosen bishop, 63; on bish-
ops, 128

Church, primitive, first formation, 25:
addressed by the apostles, 22 33; mod-
eled after the synagogue, 35. 39-46;
according to Neander, 41; Vitringa,
43; Whately. 43; name derived from
synagogue, 40; kept pure, 84; a relig-
gious society, for religious ends, 228;
no connection with state governments,
but adapted to any, 229; restraints
upon the clergy, 230; guarded against
sectarianism, 231; gave scope to min-
isterial zeal, 232; preserved harmony
in the clergy, 232; formed an efficient
ministry, 233; made an efficient laity,
235; suited to our free institutions,
233; sovereignty destroyed, 282; be-
gins to inherit property by will, 284;
corruptions of, 287
Church government popular, 25, 38, 227;
simple, 26. 28, 46, 52; changed, 78,
311; church and state united, 292-294
Church, "holy catholic," 2131
Churches, form alike, 61; bond of union

in the apostles, 150; care of them by
the apostle, 151; apostolical, their
ascendency, 247-252
Clemens, the Evangelist, 157
Clement of Rome, cited, 65, 164
Clergy, nominations in elections, 67;
opposed by the people, 72; deposed by
the church, 105: discipline by them,
114; not prosecuting officers in the
church, 120; two orders. 124 125,127;
subject to restraint, 230. 231; de-
pressed by the bishop. 274; unjust
privileges, 283; distinctions observed
with care, 289; party spirit of, 290;
sycophancy of, 291; civil and ecclesi-
astical powers, 292; appeals to the
emperor, 293; mercenary spirit, 294;
claim divine right, 295-298; perse-
cuting spirit, 298

College of presbyters, 20, 253
Collection sent by Saul, 146
Conder, on ordination, 141
Confederation of the church, 115
Congregation, meaning of. 44
Congregational singing, 378; in Germa-
ny, 379

Consignat, 178

136; their influence in forming Epis-
copal government, 265-268
Cyprian on elections, 67, 69; on disci-
pline by the church, 88

Constantinople, council, 69
Cornelius, chosen bishop, 69
Correspondence of the churches & bish-
ops, 269

Council of the churches with the apos-
tles. 33

Councils, their authority denied. 52; at
Jerusalem, 135; result not by James,

D.

Dailiè on elections, 68

Deacons chosen by the church, 34, 57;
their office, 124: induction to office,
140; distinguished from presbyters and
bishops, 145, 163
Declension, religious, caused by Episco-
pacy, 305

Delegates sent by the churches, 33, 58;
their character, 58
Delegation from Antioch to Jerusalem,

135, 147

Delegatus ecclesiae, 159
Delitzsch, Dr., on the angel of the chh,159
Aiaxovoι, 124, 167

Diocesan Episcopacy. 265-278; disfran-
chises the laity, 272; destroys the dis-
cipline of the church, 278
Discipline by the church. 34. 36, 37, 88;
argument from Scripture, 89; from the
early fathers, 95; from ecclesiastical
writers; from analogy, 108, usurped
by the priesthood, 114; authorities,
106-108; at Carthage, 100; at Rome,
102; in the Eastern church, 103; right
of lost, 116; the right inherent in the
church. 118; advantages of, 118; not
punitive, 118; neglected in the Epis-
copal church. 121, 122, 304; moral effi-
cacy of it, 123; administered by bish-
ops, 269, 273; destroyed, 278
Disciplina Arcani, 269; is an argument
against a liturgy, 347
Disfranchisement of the laity, 282
Disputes decided by the church, 33
Divine right, 71, 295-298; guidance,77
Donatists, multitude of their bishops, 207
Du Pin on discipline by the church.106;

on primitive Episcopacy, 205-208
Duties of bishop and presbyter identical,
133

E.
Edinburgh Review, on apostolical suc-
cession, 211-213

Ηγεομαι, 123
Hyovuεvoi, 124

Elections by the church, 34, 35, 53, 54;
loss of, 70-81; of an apostle, 55; by
the brethren, according to Mosheim-
Neander, Grossman, Röhr, 56; Chry-
sostom, 57; of the deacons. 57; of the
delegates 58; of the presbyters, 59;
usual mode of, 63; mode of resistance
by the bishops, 73; secular influence,
74; tumultuous proceedings-efforts
to correct them, 75; controlled by the
bishops. 76; canonical, apostolical, 80;
right of every church. 81; preserves
balance of influence, 81; foundation of
religious liberty. 82; safeguard of the
ministry. 84; of the church. 85; pro-
motes mutual endearments between
pastor and people. 86; produces an ef-
ficient ministry, 87

Emperors, Christian, mistaken efforts to
extend Christianity, 305, 306
Episcopacy, primitive, 200. See bishops.
illustrated, 195-214; fallacious rea-
soning of, 209; rise of, 234; causes of
it, 247-260; summary of its rise, 257
-259; introduction into this country,
260, 261; anti-republican characteris-
tics, 262, 263, 316; growth in this
country, 263, 264; illustrates the rise
of ancient Episcopacy, 264; divine
right of, 295-298; introduced irreligi-
ous men into the ministry, 301; origin
of, in ambition, 313; oppressive to the
laity, 117, 272, 283, 313; creates un-
just distinctions among the clergy,
314; excites bad passions, 414; in-
tolerant, 315; impairs the efficacy of
preaching, 355, 397, 400, 403-406;
fails to preserve the unity of the chh.,
406; its tendency to superstition, 418;
encourages the idea of a vicarious re-
ligion, 419; encourages a disposition
to substitute the outward form for the
inward spirit of religion, 421, 422
Episcopal concessions on names of bish

op and presbyter, 144
Episcopalians concede the identity of
bishops and presbyters, 144; the va-
lidity of presbyterian ordination, 191-
196; unsupported by argument, 226;
hindrance to ministerial usefulness,
234, 235; wanting in liberality, 237
*Επισκόποι, 124, 126, 163
̓Επισκόποῦντες, 128
*Εφοροι, 163

Eraclius, chosen bishop, 68
Eustathius chosen bishop, 68
Excommunication by the church-by
the bishops, 114

F.

Fellowship of the churches, 48; encour:
aged by the apostles, 150; interrupted
by Episcopacy

Forms of prayer opposed to the spirit of
Christianity, 319; to the example of
Christ and the apostles, 321; unautho-
rized by Christ and the apostles, 323;
contrary to the simplicity of primitive
worship, 329; unknown in the primi-
tive church, 333; opposed to gospel
freedom, and the example and instruc-
tions of Christ and the apostles, 333-
336: opposed to the simplicity of
primitive worship, 338-346; at first
indited by any one, 347; prepared for
the ignorant, 348; not adapted to the
desires of the worshipper, 352; weari-
some by repetition, 353; not in har-
mony with the subject of discourse,354

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H.

Hall, Robert, on church and state, 292
Hands, laying on of, 140
Harmony in the church, 27
Hawes' Tribute, 240
Hegesippus, character of James, 148
Heresies punished with great severity,
299; greatly increased, 300
Hierarchy, origin of, 245; further de-
velopment, 265-278; metropolitan,
279; influence of on the laity on the
clergy-on moral state of the chh., 300
Hilary on primitive worship, 330
Homilies in the primitive church, 387;
discourses of Peter, 388; of Paul, 389;
characteristics of their preaching,390;
homilies in Greek church, character-
istics, 396-398; causes of the forming
of this style, 398-401; homilies in the
Latin church, 401; causes productive
of their characteristics, 403
H. W. D. of Philadelphia, preface, 190
Hymns of human composition forbidden,
374

I.
Identity of bishops and presbyters, 124.
See under each term, bishop and pres-
byter.

Ignatius, his epistles suspected, 197;
interpolated, 198; unsatisfactory, 198,
199; do not support Episcopacy, 199,
200
Imposition of hands, 140, 143
Independence of the churches, 35,57-

150; asserted by Mosheim, 49; by
Barrow and Dr. Burton, 50; by Riddle,
51; by Whately, 23

Innocent III, arrogant pretensions, 80
Instrumental music in churches, 375
Interventors in elections, 75
Irenaeus, identity of bishops and presby
ters, 167-171

J

James not bishop at Jerusalem, 136, 146;
reasons for his residence there-his
character, 148
Jerome on elections, 69; on bishops and
presbyters, 132, 214-216
Jerusalem, council at, 135; seat of the

Christian religion, 148
Judgment, private, right of, infringed,

287

Jury of the church, trial by, 119
Justin Martyr, cited, 167; on primitive
worship and ordinances, 338-343

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Letters addressed to the church, 110;
missive by the church, 111
Liberty, religious, loss of, 81
Litigations settled by the church, 37
Liturgy formed by each bishop, 49; un-
known in the primitive church, 319,
seq., 336; no relics of any, nor record
of such as found at this time, 337;
appeal is made to tradition for such
forms as belong to the liturgy, 337,
338; liturgies the production of a cor-
rupt age, 349; for an ignorant priest-
hood, 350; encroach upon the time
which should be allotted to the sermon,
355; exalt the inventions of man above
the word of God, 356; English liturgy
of popish origin, 357; erroneous in
doctrine, 359

Lord's prayer not a prescribed form, 324;
unknown as such by the apostles and
apostolical fathers, 324-326; summa
ry conclusions respecting it, 327-329;
unsuited to the Christian dispensation,
328; varied phraseology, 323
Luther, a reformer by his musical
ers, 383

M

pow-

, 157, 158

Mareotis, supplied by presbyters, 251
Mark, the Evangelist, 157
Martin, of Tours, chosen bishop, 73
Mason, Dr. on equality of bishops and
presbyters, 129; cited, 136
Maximianists, their bishops, 207
Melatius, chosen bishop, 68

Milton's Prose Works cited, 150, 168
Ministers, none superior to presbyters,

145

Mosheim, on elections by the church,
61. See Index of Authorities.
Metropolitan Government, established,
279; means of its establishment,280-
282; results, 282

N

Neander, on the two great parties in the
church, 332. See Index of Authorities.
Nice, Council on Elections, 68
Nice, Church of jurisdiction, 251

210-211; by Metropolitan 281; by
Divine Right, 297

a

Organs in church music, 375
Origen, as a preacher, 396
Οση δύναμις αυτῷ, of Justin, 340
Overseers, name, 36

O

Offices of clergy multiplied, 288, 289
Officers of the church, 36
Onderdonk, on equality of bishops and
presbyters, 144; on office of Timothy,
153

Orders, but two in the priesthood, 163
Ordination by presbyters, 139-176; im-
port of it, 141, note; right of presby-
ters according to Firmilian, 176; to
Irenaeus, 177; to Hilary, 178–181;
to Jerome, 182-186; to Eutychius of
Alexandria, 186-188; to Planck, 188,
to Neander, 189; to Blondell, 189; to
the Canons, 189; to Dr. Miller, 190,
191; various Episcopal authorities,
191-196; by Cranmer, 191; Necessary
Erudition, 192; Whittaker, Usher, 192;
Stillingfleet, Forbes, King, Christian
Observer, 193; Goode, 194; Bowdler,
196, Summary 194, 195; Clarkson,

P
Parochial bishops, 52; parochial system,
Papal Government, 309

249

Pastor, not a prosecuting officer, 120
Patres ecclesiae, 163
Pastores, 163
Patriarchal Government, 307
Paul and Barnabas,ordaining presbyters,
61; in council at Jerusalem, 136 ;
his ordination, 143

Peace of the church, by discipline, 119
Pearson, on elections, 68
Penance, system of 114; promotes the

Penitents, restored by the church, 103
bishop's power, 271
People overreached in elections, 77; peo-
ple govern themselves in every thing,
109; rights abridged by councils, 267
Planck on divine right, 295-298. See
Index of Authorities.

Ποιμαίνω, 134

Polycarp, cited 165
Pontificale Romanum, 69
Pope of Rome, his ascendency estab.
lished, 310
Praepositi, 163

Praesides, praesidentes, praesules, 163
Prayers of the primitive church, 319;
See forms of prayer, prayers of Christ,
and the apostles extempore, 321, 322,
340; Lord's prayer,323; attitude in,340.
Presbyters, their office, 36, 125; choice

of them, 59; by the church, 61; titles,
124; equality with bishops, 124-162;
addressed as bishops, 126; term de-
rived from Jews, 131; appellations
interchanged with bishops, 126, 162;
qualifications, 131, 166; duties iden
tical with presbyter, 133; teachers of
the church, 134; counsellors, 135;
administer ordinances, 136; ordain,
139; distinguished from deacons, 163;
equal to bishops, according to Clement,
164; to Polycarp, 165; to Justin
Martyr, 167; to Irenaeus, 169; to
Clement of Alexandria, 172; to Ter-
tullian.173; ascendency of those in a
city, 252; their right to ordain, 176;
according to Firmilian, 176; to Hila-
ry, 178-181; to Jerome, 182-186;
to Eutychius, of Alexandria, 186-188;
to Planck, 188; to Neander, 189; to
Blondell, 189; to Dr. Miller, 190, 191;
to various Episcopal authorities, 191
-197; according to Jerome, 214-218;
to Chrysostom, 219, 220; to Theodoret,
221, 222; to the Greek Scholiast, 222,
223; to Elias, of Crete, and to Gregory
Naz., 223; to Isidorus, to Barnaldus,
to Pope Urban, 224; to Nicholas
Tudeschus, to J. P. Launcelot, and to
Gieseler, 225; College of, 253.

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