The Half Century: Its History, Political and Social

Εξώφυλλο
C. Gilpin, 1852 - 344 σελίδες

Αναζήτηση στο βιβλίο

Τι λένε οι χρήστες - Σύνταξη κριτικής

Δεν εντοπίσαμε κριτικές στις συνήθεις τοποθεσίες.

Περιεχόμενα

Άλλες εκδόσεις - Προβολή όλων

Συχνά εμφανιζόμενοι όροι και φράσεις

Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 147 - The resources created by peace are means of war. In cherishing those resources, we but accumulate those means. Our present repose is no more a proof of inability to act, than the state of inertness and inactivity in which...
Σελίδα 297 - And they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her, Thou art our sister, be thou the mother of thousands of millions, and let thy seed possess the gate of those which hate them.
Σελίδα 179 - His Majesty recommends that, when this essential object shall have been accomplished, you should take into your deliberate consideration the whole condition of Ireland, and that you should review the laws which impose Civil disabilities on his Majesty's Roman Catholic subjects.
Σελίδα 29 - But yesterday, the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world : now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence.
Σελίδα 21 - One asylum of free discussion is still inviolate. There is still one spot in Europe where man can freely exercise his reason on the most important concerns of society, where he can boldly publish his judgment on the acts of the proudest and most powerful tyrants. The press of England is still free. It is guarded by the free constitution of our forefathers, It is guarded by the hearts and arms of Englishmen, and I trust I may venture to say, that if it be to fall, it will fall only under the ruins...
Σελίδα 294 - I shall leave a name sometimes remembered with expressions of goodwill in the abodes of those whose lot it is to labour and to earn their daily bread by the sweat of their brow, when they shall recruit their exhausted strength with abundant and untaxed food, the sweeter because it is no longer leavened by a sense of injustice.
Σελίδα 147 - You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness — how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage — how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery — collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Σελίδα 101 - At this time the writings of William Cobbett suddenly became of great authority ; they were read on nearly every cottage hearth in the manufacturing districts of South Lancashire, in those of Leicester, Derby, and Nottingham ; also in many of the Scottish manufacturing towns. Their influence was speedily visible ; he directed his readers to the true cause of their sufferings — misgovernment ; and to its proper corrective — parliamentary reform.
Σελίδα 153 - Let us fly to the aid of Portugal, by whomsoever attacked; because it is our duty to do so: and let us cease our interference where that duty ends. We go to Portugal not to rule, not to dictate, not to pre'scribe constitutions — but to defend and to preserve the independence of an ally. We go to plant the standard of England on the well-known heights of Lisbon. Where that standard is planted, foreign dominion shall not come.
Σελίδα 119 - Oh ! it sickens the heart to see bosoms so hollow, And spirits so mean in the great and high-born ; To think what a long line of titles may follow The relics of him who died — friendless and lorn ! How proud they can press to the funeral array Of one whom they shunned in his sickness and sorrow : — How bailiffs may seize his last blanket to-day, Whose pall shall be held up by nobles to-morrow...

Πληροφορίες βιβλιογραφίας