A Pictorial History of Ancient Rome: With Sketches of the History of Modern Italy. For the Use of Schools

Εξώφυλλο
E. H. Butler, 1868 - 336 σελίδες
 

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Περιεχόμενα

Reign of Numa
24
The Horatii end Curiatii
25
Ancus Marlius Tarquin I
26
Overthrow of Tarquin the Proud 3C XVI Government of Rome under the Kings
31
Ancient Roman Armies Customs m Founding Cities
33
Literature of the Romans under the Kings
34
War of Porsenna
35
Mucius Sccevola Battle of Regillus
36
Internal Troubles at Rome
38
Revolt of the Plebeians
39
Menenius Agrippa
40
Banishment of Coriolanus
41
Veturia and Volumnia
42
Dictatorship of Cincinnatus
43
Mount Algidus
44
The Decemvirs
45
Appius Claudius and Virginia
47
Siege of Veii
49
Invasion of the Gauls
51
March of the Gauls to Rome
52
Capture of Rome by the Gauls
54
Departure of the Gauls from Rome
55
Rebuilding of Rome
57
XXVIII Condemnation of Manlius
58
The Samnite and Latin War
59
Titus Manlius
60
Devotion of Decius
61
The Caudine Forks
62
Arrival of Pyrrhus in Italy
63
War with Pyrrhus
64
Embassy of Fabricius
65
Defeat of Pyrrhus
66
Progress of the Roman Commonwealth
67
Foundation of Carthage
68
XL1X First Punic War
69
Naval Victory of Duilius
70
Regulus invades Africa
71
HI Embassy of Regulus to Rome
72
Death of Regulus
73
CONTENTS LIV End of ihe First Punic War
75
Illyrian and Gallic War
76
Commencement of the Second P nic War
77
Hannibals Passage of the Alps
78
Campaign of Hannibal in Italy
80
Battle of Thrasymenus
81
Fabius Maximus
82
LX1 Battle of Cannce
83
Battle of the Metaurus
84
Capture of Syracuse Scipios Wars in Spain
85
Battle of Zama End of the Second Punic War
87
Conquest of Greece by the Romans
88
Death of Hannibal
90
Cato the Censor
91
Third Punic War
92
LX1X Capture of Carthage
93
End of the Third Punic War
94
Tiberius Gracchus
95
Caius Gracchus
96
LXXIH End of Roman Freedom
97
The Jugurthine War
99
Conquest and Death of Jugurtha
100
Invasion of the Cimbrians and Teutones
102
Defeat of the Barbarians
103
Tumults at Rome
104
The Social War
106
The Social War
108
Rivalry of Marius and Sulla
109
Civil War of Marius and Sulla
112
Civil War of Marius and Sulla continued
113
Dictatorship of Sulla
114
The Cilician Pirates
116
LXXXVIl Conspiracy of Catiline
117
Overthrow of Catiline
119
Rebellion of Spartacus
120
XCThe First Triumvirate
122
Julius Caesar in Gaul
123
Parthian Expedition of Crass
124
Disasters of Crassus
125
Deb of Crassus
127
Rivalry of Pompey and Caesar
128
Civil War
129
Flight of Pompey from Rome
131
Pompey and Caesar in Greece
132
Battle of larsalia
133
CDeath of Pompey
134
Triumph of Ctesar
135
Dictatorship of Caesar
137
Conspiracy against Caesar
139
Assassination of Caesar
140
Mark Antony
141
Funeral of Casar
143
The Second Triumvirate
144
Brutus and Cassius
145
Battle of Philippi
147
Antony and Cleopatra
149
Rome under the Triumvirs
150
Octavius and Antony
151
Quarrel of Octavius and Antony
152
Battle of Actium
153
CXV1 Death of Antony
155
Death of Cleopatra
156
Establishment of the Power of Augustus
157
Roman Literature during the Second Period
158
Livius Andronicus Naevius Ennius Plautus
160
Terence Lucretius Catullus
161
Rome under Augustus
177
Rome under Augustus
178
Reign of Augustus
180
Reign of Augustus
182
Death of Augustus
183
Accession of Tiberius
184
3XXXVII Crimes of Sejanus
186
Reign of Caligula
187
Assassination of Caligula
189
Reign of Claudius
190
Reign of Nero
191
Crimes of Nero
194
Death of Nero
195
CXL1V Galba and Olho
197
Reign of Vitellius
198
Death of Vitellius
199
Reign of Vespasian
201
OXLVIII Reign of Vespasian continued
202
Reign of Titus
203
Herculaneum and Pompeii
206
Reign of Doinitian
208
Reign of Nerva
210
Reign of Trajan
211
Eastern Campaigns of Trajan
213
Adrian Antonmus Pius
214
Reign of Marcus Aurelius
215
Reign of Commodus
217
Death of Commodus
218
Commerce of the Romans with the East
219
Commerce of the Romans with the South and North
221
CLXI Reign of Pertinax
222
Didius Julianus
223
Reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla
225
Macrinus and Heliogabalus
226
Alexander Severus Maximin
228
JLXVI Cruelties and Death of Maximin
229
The Two Gordians
230
GordianPhilip Decius
231
CLXIXGallus jEmilianus Valerian
233
Gallienus Claudius Quintillius
235
Aurelian Zenobia
236
Death of Aurelian
238
Tacitus Probus
239
Carus Carinus and Numerian
240
DioclesianGalerius Constantius 341
241
CLXXV1 Cot stantine the Great
242
The Sons of Constantme
244
Constans Julian the Apostate
245
Death of Julian
247
Valentinian and Valens Division of the Empire
248
Gratian Invasion of the Huns
249
CLXXX1I Theodosius the Great
250
CLXXX1II Arcadius and Honorius
252
CLXXX1V The Britons
253
The Franks Burgundians and Visigoths
255
The Barbarian Governments
256
Spain the Vandals and Alani
257
ULXXXVUl Separation of Britain from the Empire
258
Stilicho
259
CXCAlaric Attila and Genseric
260
End of the Western Empire 201
261
Literature and Eminent Men during the Third Period 203
263
Virgil Horace Ovid Tihullus Propertius
264
Livy Character of the Augustan Age 207
267
Decline and Extinction of Roman Literature 209
269
Later Roman Writers
270
Religion of the Romans
273
Roman Festivals
275
The Circus Amphitheatre Gladiators
276
Roman Architecture
279
Sculpture and Painting among the Romans
281
Manners and Dress of the Romans 232
282
Food and Drink of the Romans
285
Marriage and Funeral Ceremonies of the Romans
287
Roman Military Art The Legion
289
March and Encampment of a Roman Army The Navy
291
Roman Triumphs
295
CC1X Odoacer TheodoricBelisarius
297
The Lombards
299
CCX1 Charlemasne Frederic Barbarossa
300
CCXILThe Guelphs and Ghibelliues
302
Civil Wars in Italy
303
Cola di Rienza 31
304
Schism in the Paoacy
305
CCXVIThe Venetian Republic
307
Genoa Lombardy Florence Naples
308
Establishment of the Spanish Power in Italy
309
Conspiracy of Fiesco at Genoa
310
Conspiracy of Venice
311
Insurrection of Masaniello
313
The Modern Popes
315
1CXXIII Sixtus the Fifth
316
The Italians of the Eighteenth Century 31 3
318
Modern Revolutions of Italy
320
Modern Revolutions of Italy continued
322
Modern Revolutions of Italy concluded
324
Rome under the Kings and the Republic
326
CUXXIX Architecture of Rome
327
Grandeur Embellishment nnd Decay of the City
328
Rome after the Overthrow of the Empire
329
Rome in the Middle Ages
330
Rome under the Popes
331
COXXXIV Ruins of Rome in the Fifteenth Century
332
Modern Rome
333

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Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 204 - This extraordinary phenomenon excited my uncle's philosophical curiosity to take a nearer view of it. He ordered a light vessel to be got ready, and gave me the liberty, if I thought proper, to attend him. I rather chose to continue my studies; for, as it happened, he had given me an employment of that kind.
Σελίδα 205 - ... and black pieces of burning rock : they were likewise in danger, not only of being aground by the sudden retreat of the sea, but also from the vast fragments which rolled down from the mountain, and obstructed all the shore. Here he stopped to consider whether he should return back again ; to which the pilot advising him, ' Fortune,' said he, ' befriends the brave ; carry me to Pomponianus.
Σελίδα 205 - In the meanwhile, the eruption from Mount Vesuvius flamed out in several places with much violence, which the darkness of the night contributed to render still more visible and dreadful.
Σελίδα 94 - Yet come it will, the day decreed by fates! (How my heart trembles while my tongue relates!) The day when thou, imperial Troy! must bend, And see thy warriors fall, thy glories end.
Σελίδα 206 - ... dispersed the rest of the company, and obliged him to rise. He raised himself up, with the assistance of two of his servants, and instantly fell down dead — suffocated, as I conjecture, by some gross and noxious vapor, having always had weak lungs, and being frequently subject to a difficulty of breathing.
Σελίδα 205 - befriends the brave ; carry me to Pomponianus." Pomponianus was then at Stabiae, separated by a gulf which the sea, after several insensible windings, forms upon that shore. He had already sent his baggage on board ; for though he was not at that time in actual danger, yet being within...
Σελίδα 296 - ... work. On the third day, early in the morning, first came the trumpeters, who did not sound as they were wont in a procession or solemn entry, but such a charge as the Romans use when they encourage their soldiers to fight.
Σελίδα 204 - ... for it shot up to a great height in the form of a trunk, which extended itself at the top into a sort of branches...
Σελίδα 205 - They consulted together whether it would be most prudent to trust to the houses, which now shook from side to side...
Σελίδα 204 - He was at that time with the fleet under his command at Misenum. On the 24th of August, about one in the afternoon, my mother desired him to observe a cloud which appeared of a very unusual size and shape.

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