Letters, Sentences and Maxims

Εξώφυλλο
Henry Altemus, 1892 - 307 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 124 - Talk often, but never long ; in that case, if you do not please, at least you are sure not to tire your hearers. Pay your own reckoning, but do not treat the whole company, — this being one of the very few cases in which people do not care to be treated, every one being fully convinced that he has wherewithal to pay.
Σελίδα 243 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Σελίδα 224 - I desire that you will read it over and over again, with particular attention to the style, and to all those beauties of oratory with which it is adorned. Till I read that book, I confess I did not know all the extent and powers of the English language.
Σελίδα 82 - Wear your learning, like your watch, in a private pocket : and do not pull it out and strike it ; merely to show that you have one.
Σελίδα 256 - I do not love thee, Dr. Fell, The reason why I cannot tell; But this I know, and know full well, I do not love thee. Dr. Fell.
Σελίδα 174 - The pretensions of the proud man are oftener treated with sneer and contempt than with indignation; as we offer ridiculously too little to a tradesman who asks ridiculously too much for his goods, but we do not haggle with one who only asks a just and reasonable price. Abject flattery and indiscriminate assentation degrade, as much as indiscriminate contradiction and noisy debate disgust. But a modest assertion of one's own opinion, and a complaisant acquiescence in other people's, preserve dignity....
Σελίδα 212 - Style is the dress of thoughts ; and let them be ever so just, if your style is homely, coarse, and vulgar, they will appear to as much disadvantage, and be as ill received as your person, though ever so well proportioned, would, if dressed in rags, dirt, and tatters. It is not every understanding that can judge of matter...
Σελίδα 222 - Clarendon paints as possessing beyond all his contemporaries " a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade, and a hand to execute...
Σελίδα 84 - True wit, or sense, never yet made anybody laugh; they are above it: they please the mind, and give a cheerfulness to the countenance. But it is low buffoonery, or silly accidents, that always excite laughter; and that is what people of sense and breeding should show themselves above.
Σελίδα 174 - ... at supper, for he is always joking and laughing ; we will ask another, because he plays deep at all games, or because he can drink a great deal. These are all vilifying distinctions, mortifying preferences, and exclude all ideas of esteem and regard. Whoever is had (as it 'is called) in company for the sake of any one thing singly, is singly that thing, and will never be considered in any other light ; consequently never respected, let his merits be what they will.

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