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PHOTOGRAPHIC MATTER.

By Tom Quill.

The Photographic Society connected with the Gordon College has concluded a most successful year. The object of this section, although frequently regarded by the general public chiefly as an amusement of a somewhat high degree, is really an art requiring the most careful mechanical precision combined with artistic insight of no mean order. It is only with these powers working together towards one object that the great end of this wonderful science is reached, viz:the production of a picture in its true sense. Apart from the objeot for which the picture is produced, whether for the mere gratification of looking at a pleasant scene, or for the higher aim of teaching some fact by the easiest and at the same time most pleasing of all methods of learning-by means of the visual organs-it necessitates for its students a knowledge even if only a slight one of the wonderful powers he uses in producing his pictures. I think no person can study photography for any length of time without gaining some knowledge of chemical action and the laws of light, from which would naturally grow a desire to peer deeper into the mysteries of nature's laws.

The advance of photography into everyday life, and its close connection with book illustration and newspaper work, architecture reproduction of plans, drafting and machinery, etc., all serve to show its value as a handmaiden to the arts and success.

The G. C. A. P. A. itself has indeed proved its usefulness by bringing to a successful issue one of the largest exhibitions of photographic art ever held in Australasia, while the Congress held in conjunction with it was actually the first.

The papers and lectures given by gentlemen holding a high position in the world of science and art cannot fail to produce a more thoughtful and earnest endeavour to attain even a higher standard of excellence than already shown. The remarks of the judges appearing above their signatures cannot

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but be extremely gratifying to the Society as a whole, and it. must also be a matter of pride that to its members belongs the credit of initiating the work of a Photographic Congress in the Colony.

As a social body, it has advantages peculiarly its own: while the harmony and kindly feeling that prevail, together with the exchange of thought between its members, must improve the mind, and tend to raise the tone of all connected with it.

Last but not least there is that bond invisible, but strong, which knits it to kindred societies in other lands, and which is surely one of the small factors of that great power which will some day unite the whole world in one great brotherhood.

COUNTING TIME.

By Tom QUILL.

your choice.

I HAVE seen so many methods of counting time for a photographic exposure, that I hardly know which to recommend. Many are good, and some are really remarkable, so perhaps I had better describe a few and let

you

make Some of them you may have seen. For instance, you have doubtless all seen the operator who removes the cap, and with it slowly describes imaginary cart wheels in the air, each circle representing a second of time. He then replaces the cap with the air of one who has achieved a brilliant success, which no doubt he has. It is really a great idea, but rather distracting to children when he is taking a family group, and sometimes upsets the gravity of an adult. There is also the man who alters his mind regarding the time of exposure.

If you are standing by, he will probably try and get your opinion. “Let's see,” he will say, “it's a bit dull and late, about five seconds ought to do, eh? what do you think ”; you reply that it ought to be about right, not what you really think so, but everyone is a bit hazy about exposure.

By the time the slide is in he has altered his mind, and reckons he

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had better give another second, to which you agree. He takes the cap off, rapidly counts to seven, and replaces the cap. He informs you that after he uncapped he thought he would give the seven seconds to make sure, but thinks he made a mistake after all and wishes he had stuck to five. In truth, he has given about four seconds. I should not recommend you to seek his advice when about to expose.

Then there is the friend who has learned how many he can count in a single second, and recommends you to do the same, and says he will show you what it is like. He fills himself with wind and suddenly starts off at you sputtering his figures out at an incredible rate, gets red in the face, gasps for breath and glares at you, waves his arms, and reeling off to about fiftyseven, suddenly stops counting and triumphantly informs you that he has counted exactly nine seconds better than any clock could have done. You are too bewildered to dispute his statement, and have no time to work out his arithmetic.

Then there is the happy-go-lucky photographer. He is not very particular about anything, and the number of seconds constituting an exposure is a inatter of great indifference. If his camera falls over during an exposure he remains unruffled, and calmly picking it up again planks it down as near the old position as possible, and serenely finishes the exposure, quite content with whatever occurs. I like such mer for companions, they vary the monotony of a tiring walk.

I went to see a photographic friend the other day; his wife let me in, and informed me that he was messing about as usual somewhere upstairs. I suddenly became conscious of a most terrific pounding at regular intervals. Thump! thump! thump! for about twenty times, and then a pause. The whole place vibrated with the concussion. way upstairs, and when just outside his door it recommenced. I entered, and saw my friend with the cap in his hand, thumping seconds with his foot on the floor. The place was in a quiver. “One, two, Hullo old man-three, four, five,-come right in !-six, seven, eight, nine,—How are you !-ten eleven twelve,-just doing some copying !-thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, - I'll be through in a minute, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, and that does the trick. Am giving twenty

I found my

S. R. J. MAWSON, SURGICAL & MECHANICAL DENTIST,

201, MOORABOOL STREET, GEELONG. Laughing Gas, &c., administered. Teeth extracted, 2/6.

ARTIFICIAL TEETY REDUCED TO MEET TXE TIMES.

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