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riety of particulars concerning our own country, which we should never have discovered without their assistance.

Influenced by such sentiments I am delighted to find that the Cockloft family, among its other whimsical and monstrous productions, is about to be enriched with a genuine travel-writer. This is no less a personage than mr. Jeremy CockLoft, the only son and darling pride of my cousin, mr. ChristOPHER COCKLOFT. I should have said Jeremy Cockloft, the younger, as he so styles himself, by way of distinguishing him from IL SIGNORE JEREMY COCKLOPTico, a gouty old gentleman, who flourished about the time that Pliny the elder was smoked to death with the fire and brimstone of Vesuvius; and whose travels, if he ever wrote any, are now lost forever to the world. Jeremy is at present in his one-and-twentieth year, and a young fellow of wonderful quick parts, if you will trust to the word of his father who having begotten him should be the best judge of the matter. He is the oracle of the family, dictates to his sisters on every occasion, though they are some dozen or more years older than himself;—and never did son give mother better advice than Jeremy.

As old Cockloft was determined his son should be both a scholar and a gentleman, he took great

paips with his education, which was completed at our university, where he became exceedingly expert in quizzing his teachers and playing billiards. No student made better squibs and crackers to blow up the chemical professor; no one chalked more ludicrous caricatures on the walls of the college ; and none were more adroit in shaving pigs and climbing lightning rods. He moreover learned all the letters of the greek alphabet ; could demonstrate that water never “ of its own accord” l'ose above the level of its source, and that air was certainly the principal of life ; for he had been entertained with the humane experiment of a cat, worried to death in an air-pump. He once shook down the ash-house, by an artificial earthquake; . and nearly, blew his sister Barbara, and her cat, out of the window with thundering powder. He likewise boasts exceedingly of being thoroughly acquainted with the composition of lacedemonian black broth; and once made a pot of it, which had well nigh poisoned the whole family, and actually threw the cook-maid into convulsions. But above all, he values himself upon his logic, has the old college conundrum of the cat with three tails at his finger's ends, and often hampers his father with his syllogisms, to the great delight of the old gentleman ; who considers the major, minor, and con

clusion, as almost equal in argument to the pulley, the wedge, and the lever, ini mechanics. In fact, my cousin Cockloft was once nearly annihilated with astonishment, on hearing Jeremy trace the derivation of Mango from Jeremiah King ;-as Jeremiah King, Jerry King! Jerking, Girkin! cucumber, Mango! in short, had Jeremy been a student at Oxford ar Cambridge, he would, in all probability, have been promoted to the dignity of a senior wrangler. By this sketch, I mean no dispar, agement to the abilities of other students of our college, for I have no doubt that every commencement ushers into society luminaries full as bril. liant as Jeremy Cockloft the younger.

Having made a very pretty speech on graduating, to a numerous assemblage of old folks and young ladies, who all declared that he was a very fine young man, and made 'very handsome gestures, Jeremy was seized with a great desire to see, or rather to be seen by the world; and as his father was anxious to give him every possible advantage, it was determined Jeremy should visit foreign parts. In consequence of this resolution, he has spent a matter of three or four months in visiting strange places ; and in the course of his travels has tarried some few days at the splendid metropolis' of Albany and Philadelphia.

Jeremy has travelled as every modern man of sense should do; that is, he judges of things by the sample next at hand; if he has ever any doubt on a subject, always decides against the city where he happens to sojourn ; and invariably takes home, as the standard by which to direct his judgment.

Going into his room the other day, when he happened to be absent, I found a manuscript volume laying on his table; and was overjoyed to find it contained notes and hints for a book of travels which he intends publishing. He seems to have taken a late fashionable travel-monger for his model, and I have no doubt his work will be equally instructive and amusing with that of his prototype. The following are some extracts, which may not prove uninteresting to my readers.

[graphic]

MEMORANDUMS

FOR A TOUR, TO BE ENTITLED,

* THE STRANGER IN NEW-JERSEY ;

OR, COCKNEY TRAVELLING.

BY JEREMY COCKLOFT, THE YOUNGER.

CHAPTER I.

The man in the moont-preparations for departure-hints to travellers about packing their trunkst-straps, buckles and bed-cords—case of pistols, a la cockney-five trunks--three bandboxes-a cocked hat-and a medicine-chest, a la francaise-parting advice of my two sisters-quere, why old maids are so particular in their cautions

* vide Carr's Stranger in Ireland.

ride Weld.

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