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in his early life, he became the big medicine man of the tribe. He was a good physician and a man of extraordinary intelligence, somewhat of a scientist. He was a reticent man, never talking much, but had a wonderful fund of information on almost every subject, and he was very precise. He was not a graduate of any college, but was a great reader and a self educated man; a thoughtful man, somewhat of a philosopher.

He was elected surveyor of Pinal County by his party, and served as Probate Judge for several terms. The duties of this office he discharged with fidelity and intelligence. His word was as good as his bond. No one ever knew John D. Walker to go back on his word in any way.

He raised a company of Pima Indians for the Arizona Volunteers, and was made captain of it. It is said that when they were in the field you could not tell him from the other Indians. He dressed like them, with nothing on but a breechclout, and whooped and yelled like his Indian comrades.

He had a noted fight with the Apaches above Pinal at the Picacho. South of Pinal there is a big Picacho and a perpendicular bluff, all full of crevasses. Here he surprised the Apaches and got behind them, and those he didn't kill he drove over this bluff

, wiping out the entire band, about seventy-five in number. “Even now,says Major Doran, "you can see on this battlefield the skeletons of the Apaches in the crevices; they were Tonto Apaches." : When he was Probate Judge Captain Walker lived in Florence, it being the county seat. Shortly after his induction into office, the Vekol

mine was discovered by an Indian, who showed it to Walker, and Peter R. Brady. They located it and worked it for a while. Walker bought Brady out, and took his brother Lucien, as a partner in the mine, and they worked it until they bottomed the mine. They took out about two millions of dollars, most of which Captain Walker spent among the Pima Indians, who were well taken care of.

Major Doran sold Walker's interest in the Reymont mine for a hundred and twelve thousand dollars, a hundred and five thousand of which comprised the greater portion of his estate when he died. Several years before his death Captain Walker was adjudged insane and placed in an asylum. Shortly before his death, in the year 1894 or 1895, a woman came out from Illinois and became his nurse, and conceived the idea of marrying him, which she did, the marriage ceremony being performed by an itinerant Greek minister. When Walker died the heirs consisted of three brothers and four sisters, all living outside of Arizona, and they asked Major Doran to become the administrator of the estate. Major Doran made application and was so appointed. The alleged wife also made application for appointment as administratrix, claiming that being his wife she had the best right to administer the estate. Major Doran contested her claim, and that suit was in litigation for over five years. It went to the Supreme Court of the United States and was decided in favor of Major Doran.

Soon after an heir cropped up in the person of an Indian girl, Juana Walker, who claimed to be Walker's heir because he had lived with

her mother and had been married to her under the tribal laws of the Pimas. This suit was contested by the administrator on the ground that a white man could not marry an Indian under the laws of the Territory. It was appealed to the Supreme Court of the Territory, and then to the Supreme Court of the United States, finally being decided in favor of the administrator.

After all these suits were disposed of the estate was divided among the heirs. The Vekol mine was reorganized, and McCabe, one of the lawyers of Juana Walker, received some of the stock, but, according to Major Doran, the Indian heir received nothing.

Major Doran says of Captain Walker: “He was somewhat of a scientist. I remember the Smithsonian Institute claimed that the Gila Monster was not poisonous. He contended that it was, and wrote a dissertation upon the subject, and sent it and a specimen to them for analysis. They reversed their decision and admitted that it was poisonous.”

Of course there are many minor incidents in connection with Captain Walker's life in Arizona and elsewhere, but these comprise the main facts. The least that can be said of him was that he was a man of fine attainments, generous to a fault; the best type of the Western man, which embodies everything that is bold, chivalrous, and honorable.

Captain Washburn came from Mexico to Arizona, and after his term of service here, went to Washington, where he held a position in one of the Departments. He never returned to Ariżona. Concerning Lieut. Hutton I have been unable to obtain anything whatever.

CHAPTER VI.
THE INDIANS AND THE MILITARY.

FIRST RESERVATION IN ARIZONA-INCREASED MIL

ITARY PROTECTION AGAINST INDIANS-GEN-
ERAL MASON'S ORDER TO KILL ALL MALE
APACHES ABLE TO BEAR ARMS-GENERAL
MASON'S POLICY-CHARLES A. SHIBEL
HIS STORY-PRINCIPAL INDIAN FIGHTS IN
NORTHERN PART OF TERRITORY-SKULL VAL-
LEY FIGHT-FORT ROCK FIGHT-FIGHT BE-
TWEEN MINT AND SKULL VALLEYS—BATTLE
FLAT FIGHT-KILLING OF INDIAN AGENT
LEIHY-KILLING OF DR. TAPPAN-RECEP-
TION TO GENERAL MCDOWELL AT PRESCOTT-
GOVERNMENT FARM ESTABLISHED AT FORT
MCDOWELL-MILITARY HEADQUARTERS RE-

MOVED TO TUCSON. Through the influence of Mr. Poston, Congress appropriated twenty thousand dollars for presents, etc., for the Indians on the Colorado River. This reservation was located in the latter part of the year 1865, and on it were gathered Iretaba's tribe of Colorado Mohaves. It does not appear that any other band of Indians were located permanently at that time upon this reservation. Iretaba, their chief, was taken on a visit to Washington, which so impressed him with the power of the nation, that he used his influence, 'meager though it was, to induce his Indians to discontinue their warfare against the whites. The result was that during the year 1865, there were but few murders committed by these Indians, their depredations being confined to the stealing of livestock. This was the first

reservation set aside by the general government for Indians in Arizona after the organization of the Territory, and it still exists to-day, where the Indians are cultivating their own fields, are self-supporting, their children are educated at a Government school, and the tribe will soon be prepared to assume all the responsibilities of American citizenship.

The larger portion of the California Volunteers were mustered out in September, 1864, and only skeleton forces remained to occupy and defend the posts. So hostilities continued with but little cessation, and the year 1865 came in with raids and depredations by the Indians in full swing. Early in February, 1865, Colonel C. E. Bennett visited Fort Bowie and condemned the quarters as being unfit for use, and recommended that the new quarters be made of rock. About this time Old Fort Buchanan was being used as a vidette station, some six or eight men being stationed there. On the 17th of February, 1865, it was attacked by about one hundred Apaches, who fired the roof of the building. The soldiers escaped, but afterward it was found that one was missing; whether he ran away or was captured and killed, it was not known. He was out hunting at the time, and probably was killed by the Indians. All the horses, clothing, supplies, etc., fell into the hands of the Apaches.

In the northwest part of the Territory, around Fort Mohave, there seems to have been much trouble. The commander of the post reported that the Indians had been massacring and robbing travellers and capturing freight trains. On February 22nd, orders were issued to arrest twenty of the Chimehuevi Indians, and hold

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