Primitive Industry: Or, Illustrations of the Handiwork, in Stone, Bone and Clay, of the Native Races of the Northern Atlantic Seaboard of America

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G.A. Bates, 1881 - 560 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 247 - Jones93 has figured and described a series of perforated net-sinkers, of which, he remarks, " all of the perforated sort that I have seen, with one exception, were formed either of soapstone or of clay. Consisting generally of flat or rounded pieces of soapstone, irregular in shape, they vary in weight from scarcely more than an ounce to a pound and upward. The perforations are from a quarter of an inch to an inch in diameter, and are indifferently located, either in the centre or near the edge of...
Σελίδα 4 - ... us, and as well, or better, if we may believe what our Forefathers have told us. We had then Room enough, and Plenty of Deer, which was easily caught; and tho...
Σελίδα 327 - Generally all the Men throughout the Countrey have a Tobacco-bag with a pipe in it, hanging at their back; sometimes they make such great pipes, both of wood and stone, that they are two...
Σελίδα 418 - ... in the Lake Superior region. Indeed, it is not improbable that all the copper articles, found along the Atlantic coast, were brought from western localities ; and that the metal that was at hand in New Jersey was not recognized, or, at least, not utilized. Covered in part by earth, discolored by oxidation, and lying among rock of many descriptions in a densely wooded country, it might well have escaped even the notice of the keen-eyed redskin. Whether the copper of New Jersey, or that from other...
Σελίδα 387 - By the system of names imposed on the men composing the Algonquin, Iroquois, Cherokee, and other nations, a fox, a bear, a turtle, etc., is fixed upon as a badge or stem, from which the descendants may trace their parentage. To do this the figure of an animal is employed as a heraldic sign or surname. This sign is called in the Algonquin, town-mark or totem.
Σελίδα 397 - I was surprised to find the value these people attach to this medicine. They begged and implored Col. Murphy to recover it for them, and promised to pay the Utes as many horses as they wanted, and also to make a permanent and lasting peace not only with the Utes, but also to refrain from further depredations on the Texas border, if this should be restored. Col. Murphy promised to endeavor to recover it, but I think his success in the matter will be doubtful, as the Utes also attach great importance...
Σελίδα 40 - In cutting trees, fire was applied at the root, and the chisel used to clear away the coal. By a repetition of the process, trees were felled and cut to pieces. Wooden vessels were hollowed out by the same means. Fire and the chisel were the substitutes for the axe. The chisel was usually about six inches long, three wide, and two thick ; the lower end being fashioned like the edge of an axe. Stone gouges in the form of a convex chisel, were also used when a more regular concavity of the vessel was...
Σελίδα 489 - ... the production of a cutting edge, and there is no portion of the stone detached which does not add to the availability of the supposed implement as such ; while in the case of a pebble that has been accidentally broken, there is necessarily all absence of design in the fracturing. Although the portions detached from...
Σελίδα 418 - ... very workmanly made. Their chains are many hollow pieces cemented together, each piece of the bigness of one of our reeds, a finger in length, ten or twelve of them together on a string, which they wear about their necks : their collars they wear about their bodies like bandeliers a handful broad, all hollow pieces, like the other, but somewhat shorter, four hundred pieces in a collar, very fine and evenly set together.
Σελίδα 374 - ... it may reasonably be concluded from the uniform shape of these articles, and from their apparent unfitness as implements, as also from the wide range of their occurrence, that they were invested with a conventional significance as insignia, or badges of distinction, or as amulets. We know that the custom of wearing certain stones as preventives of disease, or as safeguards against accidents or the malice of evil spirits, has not been confined to one continent, or to a single age.. It is not entirely...

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