How Did England Become an Oligarchy?: Addressed to Parliamentary Reformers. To which is Added a Short Treatise on the First Principles of Political Government

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J. Madden, 1842 - 105 σελίδες
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Σελίδα 49 - He fairly told them, in his first speech, that, "if they should not do their duties, in contributing to the necessities of the state, he must, in discharge of his conscience, use those other means which God had put into his hands, in order to save that which the follies of some particular men may otherwise put in danger. Take not this for a threatening...
Σελίδα 48 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted bifthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Σελίδα 71 - Long parliaments become therefore independent of the people, and when they do so, there always happens a most dangerous dependence elsewhere. Long parliaments give the minister an opportunity of getting acquaintance with members, of practising his several arts to win them into his schemes. This must be the work of time. Corruption is of so base a nature, that at first sight it is extremely shocking.
Σελίδα 72 - ... the last fatal compliment they can pay to the crown ; — if this should ever be the unhappy condition of this nation, the people indeed may complain ; but the doors of that place, where their complaints should be heard, will for ever be shut against them.
Σελίδα 32 - ... be seen, that when any lord is called to high estate, and hath not convenient livelihood to support the same dignity, it induceth great poverty and indigence, and causeth * oftentimes great extortion, imbracery and maintenance to be had, to the great trouble of all such countries where such estate shall happen to be...
Σελίδα 72 - ... of the people, the offspring of his corruption, who will be at all times ready to reconcile and justify the most contradictory measures of his administration : and even to vote every crude indigested dream of their patron into a law : if the maintenance of his power should become the sole object of their attention, and they should be guilty of the, most violent breach of parliamentary trust, by giving the King a discretionary...
Σελίδα 34 - Eighth, doth not only take away the possessions which were given to him at the time of his creation, but also the dignity itself...
Σελίδα 55 - Is. 3d. per barrel on all their beer and ale,' with a proportionate sum on all other liquors sold throughout the kingdom. And it was enacted that a moiety of this tax 'shall be settled on the King's Majesty, his heirs and successors, in full recompense and satisfaction for all tenures in capite and by knight service, and of the courts of wards and liveries, and all emoluments thereby accruing, and in full satisfaction for all purveyance.
Σελίδα 34 - ... onus, yet it is very inconvenient that a dignity should be clothed with poverty; and in cases of writs, and such other legal proceedings, he is accounted in law a nobleman, and so ought to be called in respect of his dignity ; but yet, if he want possessions to maintain his estate, he cannot press the king, in justice, to grant him a writ to call him to the parliament, and so it was resolved in the case of the Lord...
Σελίδα 26 - He required that all slaves should be set free; that all commonages should be open to the poor as well as to the rich; and that a general pardon should be passed for the late outrages. Whilst he made these demands, he now and then lifted up his sword in a menacing manner; which insolence so raised the indignation of William...

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