Johnsoniana; or, Supplement to Boswell [ed. by J.W. Croker].

Εξώφυλλο
John Wilson Croker
1836
 

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Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 388 - In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice ; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain...
Σελίδα 467 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Σελίδα 439 - OATS [a grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people], — Croker.
Σελίδα 373 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod...
Σελίδα 467 - They that are delivered from the noise of archers in the places of drawing water, there shall they rehearse the righteous acts of the Lord...
Σελίδα 384 - A wise man will make haste to forgive, because he knows the true value of time, and will not suffer it to pass away in unnecessary pain. He that willingly suffers the corrosions of inveterate hatred, and gives up his days and nights to the gloom of malice and perturbations of stratagem, cannot surely be said to consult his ease.
Σελίδα 391 - The force of his comic scenes has suffered little diminution from the changes made by a century and a half, in manners or in words. As his personages act upon principles arising from genuine passion, very little modified by particular forms, their pleasures and vexations are communicable to all times and to all places; they are natural, and therefore durable.
Σελίδα 315 - A man so various, that he seem'd to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome...
Σελίδα 390 - Imlac, happen much more often than superficial observers will easily believe. Perhaps, if we speak with rigorous exactness, no human mind is in its right state. There is no man whose imagination does not sometimes predominate over his reason, who can regulate his attention wholly by his will, and whose ideas will come and go at his command.
Σελίδα 384 - Whoever considers the weakness both of himself and others, will not long want persuasives to forgiveness. We know not to what degree of malignity any injury is to be imputed ; or how much its guilt, if we were to inspect the mind of him that committed it, would be extenuated by mistake, precipitance, or negligence ; we cannot be certain...

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