The Works of Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Alban and Lord High Chancellor of England

Εξώφυλλο
C. and J. Rivington, 1826
 

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Περιεχόμενα

To the lord treasurer Burghley in excuse of the authors speech in parliament against the triple subsidy
211
To the lord keeper of the great seal
212
To the lord keeper
213
To the lord keeper
214
To the lord keeper
215
To the lord keeper 2l6 21 To the lord keeper
217
To the lord keeper
219
To the lord keeper
220
To the lord keeper
221
To the lord keeper
222
To the lord keeper
223
Letter Page 29 To the lord keeper
224
To the lord keeper
225
To my lord of Essex 226
226
To Sir John Stanhope
234
To my lord of Essex
235
To the queen
236
To Sir Robert Cecil 2S7 41 To Sir Robert Cecil
238
To Foulk Grevil
239
To Sir Robert Cecil at his being in France
241
A letter of advice to the earl of Essex to take upon him the care of Irish causes when Mr secretary Cecil was in France
242
47 A letter of advice to the earl of Essex upon the first treaty with Tyrone before the earl was nominated for the charge of Ireland
244
A letter of advice to my lord of Essex immediately be fore his going into Ireland
246
To my lord of Essex
250
A letter to the earl of Essex in offer of his service when he was first enlarged to Essex house
251
To my lord of Essex
253
To my lord Henry Howard
254
Two letters framed the one as from Mr Anthony Bacon to the earl of Essex the other as the earls answer thereunto
256
57 A letter framed as from the earl in answer to the former letter
259
A letter to Mr secretary Cecil after the defeating of the Spanish forces in Ireland inciting him to embrace the care of reducing that kingdom to civility...
261
Considerations touching the queens service in Ireland
262
59 To my lord of Canterbury
268
A letter of recommendation of his service to the earl of Northumberland a few days before queen Elizabeths death
269
Letter Page 62 To Mr Fowlys
270
To Mr Fowlys
271
To Sir Thomas Chaloner then in Scotland before his majestys entrance
272
An offer of service to the king upon his first coming in
273
A letter to the lord of Kinlosse upon his majestys en trance
275
67 A letter to Dr Morison a Scotish physician upon his majestys coming in
276
69 To Mr Robert Kempe upon the death of queen Eliza beth
277
To the earl of Northumberland recommending a procla mation to be made by the king at his entrance
278
To the earl of Southampton upon the kings coming in
279
To Mr Matthew signifying the proceedings of king James at his first entrance into England
280
To the earl of Northumberland
281
A letter to Mr Murray of the kings bedchamber
282
To Mr Pierce secretary to the lord deputy of Ireland
283
To the earl of Northampton desiring him to present the Advancement of Learning to the king
284
77 To Sir Thomas Bodly upon sending his book of Ad vancement of Learning
285
To the lord treasurer Buckhurst on the same subject
286
To the lord chancellor Egerton on the same subject
287
To Mr Matthew
288
To Mr Playfere desiring him to translate the Advance ment into Latin
289
To the lord chancellor touching the History of Bri tain
290
To the king touching the History of his Times
294
To the earl of Salisbury concerning the solicitors place
295
To the lord chancellor concerning the solicitors place
297
To my lady Packington
298
To the king touching the solicitors place
299
To the earl of Salisbury upon a newyears tide
301
To Sir George Carew on sending him the treatise u In felicem memoriam Elizabeths
303
To the king upon presenting the Discourse touching the Plantation of Ireland
304
Letter Page 96 To the bishop of Ely upon sending his writing intitled Cogitata et visa
305
Sir Thomas Bodlys letter to Sir Francis Bacon about his Cogitata et visa wherein he declareth his opi nion freely touching the same
308
99 To Mr Matthew upon sending to him a part of In stauratio magna
315
To Mr Matthew upon sending Ids book De sapientia veterum
318
To the king
319
To the king
320
To the Prince of Wales dedicating his Essays to him
321
To the earl of Salisbury lord treasurer
322
To my lord Mayor
323
To Sir Vincent Skinner
324
To Sir Henry Saville
325
Of helps of the intellectual powers
330
To the king
358
To the king concerning the new company
359
To Sir George Villiers about Ropers place
362
To the king advising him to break off with the new company
365
To the king touching the chancellors sickness
367
A letter to the king of my lord chancellors amendment
370
and the difference begun between the chancery and kings bench
371
To Sir George Villiers
372
To Sir George Villiers about swearing him into the privy council
373
To the king of the chancery and kings bench
374
To the king on the breach of the new company
379
To Sir George Villiers
382
Letter Page 134 To his majesty about the earl of Somerset
383
To his majesty about the chancellors place
385
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of Somerset
389
A letter to the king with his majestys observations upon it
390
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of Somerset
394
To Sir George Villiers of Somersets arraignment
396
To the king about Somersets examination
397
An expostulation to the lord chief justice Coke
399
To Sir George Villiers
407
To the king about the Commendams
408
A memorial for his majesty 1616
410
To Sir George Villiers
415
Touching the Commendams
416
To Sir George Villiers
430
431
431
To Sir George Villiers about Irish affairs
433
To the king
436
To Sir George Villiers on sending his patent
438
157 To the king of Sir George Villierss patent
439
To Sir George Villiers on sending his patent sealed
440
To Sir George Villiers acknowledging the kings favour
441
To the lord viscount Villiers
443
Reasons why the new company is not to be trusted and continued with the trade of cloths
444
To the lord viscount Villiers
445
To the lord viscount Villiers
446
To Sir Francis Bacon his majestys attorney general
447
The case of John Bertram
448
To the lord viscount Villiers
453
To the lord viscount Villiers
456
To the earl of Buckingham
457
To the university of Cambridge
458
To the earl of Buckingham
459
To the earl of Buckingham
460
To the king about the Spanish match
461
To the earl of Buckingham
463
177 An account of council business and other matters
464
referred to in the foregoing letter
468
179 To the lord keeper
469
Letter Page 180 To the earl of Buckingham
470
To the king
472
To the earl of Buckingham
475
To the earl of Buckingham
476
A memorial for his majesty
477
To the earl of Buckingham
481
To the lord keeper
482
To the earl of Buckingham
483
To the earl of Buckingham
485
To the king
487
To the marquis of Buckingham
488
To Mr Matthew about reading and giving judgment upon his writings
489
To the marquis of Buckingham
490
To the lord chancellor
492
To the king
493
To the lord Chancellor
494
To the marquis of Buckingham
495
To the marquis of Buckingham
496
To the marquis of Buckingham
497
To the marquis of Buckingham
500
To the marquis of Buckingham
501
To the lord chancellor
503

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Σελίδα 167 - your grace, that were not for mine ease : they are " most of them my retainers, that are come to do " me service at such a time as this, and chiefly to " see your grace." The king started a little, and said, " By my faith, my lord, I thank you for my " good cheer, but I may not endure to have my laws " broken in my sight: my attorney must speak with
Σελίδα 153 - ... the privilege of his order ; and the pity in the common people, which if it run in a strong stream, doth ever cast up scandal and envy, made it generally rather talked than believed that all was but the king's device. But howsoever it were, hereupon Perkin, that had offended against grace now the third time, was at the last proceeded with, and by commissioners of oyer and determiner, arraigned at Westminster, upon...
Σελίδα 294 - I thought best once for all to let you know in plainness what I find of you, and what you shall find of me. You take to yourself a liberty to disgrace and disable my law, my experience, my discretion.
Σελίδα 95 - After such time as she thought he was perfect in his lesson, she began to cast with herself from what coast this blazing star should first appear, and at what time it must be upon the horizon of Ireland; for there had the like meteor strong influence before.
Σελίδα 295 - Solicitor together; but either to serve with another upon your remove, or to step into some other course; so as I am more free than ever I was from any occasion of unworthy conforming myself to you, more than general good manners or your particular good usage shall provoke; and if you had not been short-sighted in your own fortune, as I think, you might have had more use of me. But that tide is passed.
Σελίδα 364 - England, to bring any case that may concern your majesty, in profit or power, from the ordinary benches, to be tried and judged before your chancellor of England, by the ordinary and legal part of his power: and your majesty knoweth your chancellor is ever a principal counsellor, and instrument of monarchy, of immediate dependence upon the king: and therefore like to be a safe and tender guardian of the royal rights.
Σελίδα 358 - Fulke Greville, servant to queen Elizabeth, counsellor to king " James, and friend to Sir Philip Sidney.
Σελίδα 142 - ... himself no more Richard, Duke of York, but Richard the Fourth, King of England. His council advised him by all means to make himself master of some good walled town ; as well to make his men find the sweetness of rich spoils, and to allure to him all loose and lost people, by like hopes of booty ; as to be a sure retreat to his forces, in case they should have any ill day, or unlucky chance in the field.
Σελίδα 399 - there is a time to speak, and a time to keep silence." One meets with people in the world, who seem never to have made the last of these observations. And...
Σελίδα 393 - For certainly there may be an evidence so balanced, as it may have sufficient matter for the conscience of the peers to convict him, and yet leave sufficient matter in the conscience of a king upon the same evidence to pardon his life; because the peers are astringed by necessity either to acquit or condemn ; but grace is free : and, for rny part, I think the evidence in this present case will be of such a nature. Thirdly, It shall be my care so to moderate the manner of charging him, as it might...

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