Politics and the Academy: Arnold Toynbee and the Koraes Chair

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Psychology Press, 1986 - 117 σελίδες
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In Joseph Conrad's tales, representations of women and of "feminine" generic forms like the romance are often present in fugitive ways. Conrad's use of allegorical feminine imagery, fleet or deferred introductions of female characters, and hybrid generic structures that combine features of "masculine" tales of adventure and intrigue and "feminine" dramas of love or domesticity are among the subjects of this literary study. Many of Conrad's critics have argued that Conrad's fictions are aesthetically flawed by the inclusion of women and love plots; thus Thomas Moser has questioned why Conrad did not "cut them out altogether." Yet a thematics of gender suffuses Conrad's narrative strategies. Even in tales that contain no significant female characters or obvious love plots, Conrad introduces elusive feminine presences, in relationships between men, as well as in men's relationships to their ship, the sea, a shore breeze, or even in the gendered embrace of death. This book investigates an identifiably feminine "point of view" which is present in fugitive ways throughout Conrad's canon. Conrad's narrative strategies are articulated through a language of sexual difference that provides the vocabulary and grammar for tales examining European class, racial, and gender paradigms to provide acute and, at times, equivocal investigations of femininity and difference.

 

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Σχετικά με τον συγγραφέα (1986)

Richard Clogg has been Lecturer in Modern Greek History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies and King's College, University of London, Reader in Modern Greek History at King's College, London and Professor of Modern Balkan History in the University of London. From 1990 to 2005 he was a Fellow of St Antony's College, Oxford and is now an Emeritus Fellow of the College. He has written extensively on Greek history and politics from the eighteenth century to the present.

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