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Hon. PHILLIP BURTON,

U.S. Congressman,

THE HIGH COURT OF AMERICAN SAMOA,

Pago Pago, American Samoa, March 7, 1972.

House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. BURTON: As much as I had wanted to submit my testimony earlier, I regret I was unable to do so because of the press of local affairs. For the same reason I am unable to come to Washington to testify. However, I hope my testimony in paper would suffice, speaking for myself.

American Samoa is the only territory or possession of the United States that was not purchased, conquered, or acquired by bloodshed. It was peacefully ceded to the Government of the United States by the paramount chiefs and high talking chiefs of Tutuila, in 1900, and by King Tuimanu'a, Fa'atui and Tooto'o of Manu'a, in 1904.

In ceding the islands, our forefathers, who signed the Treaty of Cession, uneducated and unsophisticated as they were in international affairs and matters of politics, undoubtedly were guided by Providence and the Paraclyte, for their perspicacity and purposes which motivated them to peacefully cede their islands have proved to the whole world to be beneficial and efficacious. They seemed to have foreseen the efficacy of entrusting the future and welfare of their progeny to the care of the magnanimous Government and philanthropic People of the United States.

For the last seventy-two years, the people of Tutuila and Manu'a have basked in the sunshine of love, generosity, and philanthropy, of that magnanimous Government and philanthropic People. Statistics and documents in file speak for the innumerable beneficial things done and contributed by the Government and People of the United States to the welfare of the people of American Samoa: increase in population, health, education, roads, government, economy, etc. etc. From the first military administrator to the present civilian governor, the world has watched the swing of the pendulum; chiefs and talking chiefs and their respective people die; their descendants born, but the pendulum keeps on swinging. One administrator or governor fails in one way or another; others succeed, but the pendulum keeps on swinging. One thing noticeable and remarkable is, that all those persons appointed and assigned to the Government of American Samoa to administer over the people, despite the difference in their manner of administration, had and have one thing in common: to see that the people are happy, healthy, educated, keep their lands, and have their own ways of life; to see that their real and personal properties are protected, and, last but not the least, that their CUSTOMS and CULTURE are respected and kept intact. In signing the Treaty of Cession, the representatives of the United States, in reciprocation, made a sacred pledge to "see that the CUSTOMS and CULTURE of the Samoan people are respected and protected." Governors come and go; Leaders and People of Samoa die and are born; Executive and Administrative officials and the Samoan Leaders and People differ or misunderstand, but the Government and People of the United States have never, since that sacred pledge was made, relinquished their stand to see that their sacred pledge is respected and fulfilled.

The Leaders and People of American Samoa have, in several instances, proved their loyalty and gratitude to their benefactors, the Government and People of the United States. They volunteered their help in building roads, schools, projects like the T.V. facilities on Mt. Alava, and several others. But what is most outstanding and admirable, is the voluntary service American Samoa's sons and daughters have given to the Armed Forces of the United States. They have fought hand in hand with their American brothers and sisters: many of them have their footprints on the sandy beaches of Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima, and Tarawa, and a large number have their blood besprinkled over the battlefields in Europe, Asia, and the Far East, particularly Korea and Japan. In Samoa, many Samoan and Caucasin men and women teach the same classrooms and work in the same offices and studios. Thus the friendship and relationship between the Government and People of the United States and American Samoa is unquestionably mutual and congenial.

Evolution of time, gradual but steady encroachment of western civilization, modern forms of government and philosophies, the aftermath of college education acquired by our young men and women, fear of the leaders and paramount

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chiefs and high talking chiefs (sometimes under disguise of conservatism) that they will lose their power, authority, and status, if the political ship is left to the captaincy of the untitled but educated, and several other social reasons have caused (1) our leaders and elders to disagree among themselves, (2) sons of leaders, missionaries, the untitled, and the educated, to rival against each other and have constant envy and jealousy, (3) division or disagreement between families, villages, counties, and districts, and (4) the reluctance of the upper echelon to accept or respect any move toward a change in government and having as governor an untitled person.

The questions to be answered are: (1) Who can reconcile these differences and misunderstandings? (2) Who can put an end to this constant envy and jealousy? (3) Will the passing of HR12493 and/or election of a governor and lieutenant governor bring peace and harmony, or make things worse or better? The answers in response to these questions are:

(1) The Department of the Interior and Congress of the United States can reconcile the differences and misunderstandings by able and philosophical management. Form a committee or commission of five members from Washington and five from American Samoa; persons selected must be knowledgeable in Samoan customs and culture, the motives of the chiefs, the Samoan mind, and administration of island governments.

(2) Fair, impartial, and unbiased treatment of all applicants. Nepotism and favoritism are getting to be very flagrant in Samoa in employing people. Straightfordwardness and truth should be told the applicant, instead of sending him to Peter and Paul, Maggie and Kathy, the department head or his representative knowing very well that he or she has already hush-hushed the hiring of a friend or relative.

(3) It will not bring peace and harmony; things will become worse. What is the best solution to the present problem, H.R. 12493? The Bill should be passed, but the election of a Governor and Lt. Governor be kept in abeyance until the Convention in July (1972).

The paramounts and the elders fear that the passing of the Bill would, without any doubt, entitles any educated or qualified non-titled or titled but not a paramount to hold the position of Governor and/or Lt. Governor. The pessimists and doubting-Thomas' say no Samoan at present is qualified to hold the position of Governor. When then will the Samoan people be qualified? It is

now or never.

Let us discuss the question of qualification. There are Samoan people now who are qualified for the position of Governor. In fact the Samoan people were qualified ten years ago. Several of our young men, some middle-aged, have not only graduated from stateside colleges with Degrees, but have had the training and experience to become Governor. The Bible and History books contain several evidentiary proofs that a person does not have to go to college to be a king, governor, or an emperor. Nature provides the cure for the illnesses of primitive peoples. Likewise, Providence endows the rulers selected by their people with wisdom. Many of the past and present administrators in many countries did not go to college, and thus hold no Degrees, yet they administer well and justly. Procedurally and as a matter of policy, administrators depend largely on their staffs to do the work for them. All they do is delegate, authorize, assign, decide, and sign. On the other hand, there are persons now I fully believe could manage to hold the positions in question. Realization of the importance of the position (s), efforts to make self-improvement, and to prove him worthy of the trust given him by the people who voted for him, would be the guide for the incumbent.

Some may argue the difficulty to become a just and impartial incumbent because of the matai and aiga (extended family) systems. This is true, however, the incumbent would be all the time advised by his constituents, relatives and friends against this. In addition, there are other government officials who will be watchdogs. Notwithstandingly, however, if the Bill is not passed at this or some time sooner, when then will it be passed? When will the Samoan people be declared and proved qualified? One thing that bothers me, however, is the manner with which the Bill was introduced. Logically speaking, any Bill or Petition in connection with the election of a Governor for American Samoa, or for any change in form or status of government, should originate with or come from the Samoan people themselves and/or the Department of the Interior. Although I appreciate the interest of Mr. Matsunaga and others involved in the

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introduction of HR 12493, I deplore their failure to consult the matter first with the Governor and Leaders of American Samoa. Their failure prompts a suspicion that there might be some ulterior motives behind their solicitude. If their interests were not genuine, I would then argue against the passing of the Bill.

I have already presented by pros and cons concerning the matter of the Bill. However, it is my firm belief, based on my almost fifty years service with both the Governments of the United States and American Samoa, my thorough knowledge of the Samoan customs and culture and the Samoan mind, my several years of working for and with naval and civilian administrators and their staffs, my legal training and association with overseas and local government officials, businessmen, judges and lawyers, educators and anthropologists, that it is best for all concerned that the matter of Passing HR 12493 and Election of a Governor and Lt. Governor for American Samoa, be kept in abeyance until the Convention in July of this year. This will absolve the Government and People of the United States from any blame. Please bear in mind the uniqueness of the status of American Samoa, the only territory or possession of the United States with a matai and aiga system.

Respectfully submitted,

NAPOLEONE A. TUITELELEAPAGA.

WORLD TRADE BUSINESS, DEPARTMENT, IBS-7,
Fagatogo, Pago Pago, American Samoa, February 25, 1972.

CONGRESSMAN PHILLIP BURTON,
Chairman of the Subcommittee on Territorial Affairs, House Office Building,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. BURTON: It is obvious that a public Hearing will be conducted in Washington, D.C. provided an elected Governor and Lieutenant Governor for American Samoa.

Whereas in accordance with the Constitution of the United States that a free press, free speech, and a free expression of ideas, thoughts, and opinions relative to certain subjects should be otherwise considered respectively. And that I, therefore, as a free individual, have a right to submit to the Hearing the following TESTIMONY as a Ten-Point Package.

Question A. WILL A SAMOAN CANDIDATE BE ELECTED AS GOVERNOR FOR AMERICAN SAMOA?

Answer B. My Testimonial Answer to the questions indicated above is that-in a general point of view that—“This is not the right time, but very sooner, four (4) years more or less, a qualified Samoan Candidate necessarily be elected as Governor for American Samoa."

Mr. Chairman-regardless of not appearing in person in this Hearing that I, furtherly testify and witness in this Hearing before the presence of the Chairman and the Subcommittee members that-because of the existing Ego-Centric Nature of a Samoan that-there will be no qualified Samoan Candidate at the present time necessarily be elected as Governor for American Samoa.

Mr. Chairman-And, otherwise in a general point of view the situation at the present time is well proportional to 10-Point Package Testimony submitted herewith that

1. He, whoever, a Samoan Candidate be elected as Governor for American Samoa, provided his Administration would be undoubtedly directed on a Partial Basis which may possibly benefit only a few number of people, and thus otherwise loses the common interests of a great majority of the people, who loyally wish to support his Administration as Governor of American Samoa.

2. A Samoan Candidate be elected as Governor for American Samoa may or may not be able to up-hold the Governorship Position, provided no possibilities that should meet the necessary wants and requirements of the people of American Samoa, thus otherwise only benefited himself.

3. He, whoever, a Samoan Candidate be elected as Governor for American Samoa has been contained in himself an existing Ego-Centric nature-a potentially inward impulse that may strongly insist himself to lead his Administration towards to an absolutely wrong course which may spring up a drastic confusion and pell-mell among the people of American Samoa, and thus otherwise trended to a Governmental corruption.

4. Regardless of the Traditional status, there will be no Samoan Candidate has acquired a sufficient background from a College or University, and he is wholly lacked on Governorship experience.

5. He is anyway lacked on a background concerned with International-Diplomatic-Relations.

6. He is probably underestimated on visualizing a future economic conditions in proportional to the increased oncoming future generations of American Samoa.

7. He is probably too pride with self-prestige, thus otherwise, he is allowing a wrong pleasing-fancy to certain friendly individuals.

8. He is perhaps making considerations and decisions on certain problems and disputes admiring only, one good side view, and ignored a bad side view.

9. A Samoan Candidate be elected as Governor for American Samoa that I, personally believe that his Administration, in a general point of view, is not as good as a Palagi Governor administers. If that is the case, that I further testify and witness in this Hearing before Mr. Chairman and the Subcommittee thatno Samoan Candidate be qualified as to hold the Administration as Governor for American Samoa.

10. Mr. Chairman, without my personal appearance in this Hearing that I, again furtherly testify and witness in this Hearing before the Chairman and the Subcommittee that I move, that the subject on elected Governors for American Samoa should be turned down and placed it in the agenda for 4 years more or less, then later be resumed for further discussion and public Hearing respectively.

C. To sum up the 10-Point Package Testimony above that I, truly testify and witness in this Hearing before the Chairman and the Subcommittee that-the subject on a Governor for American Samoa should be APPOINTED by the President of the United States through the consideration of the Secretary of the Interior Department. By so doing, thus will possibly elapse the common desires and wishes of those who want to be Governor for American Samoa. That he, whoever, is appointed from Washington, D.C. will calmly settle the matter without any dispute or argument occurred among the people of American Samoa. Thus one's (who is who?) Administration as Appointed Governor from Washington, D.C. for American Samoa would be certainly supported with loyalty by the people of American Samoa as Governor for the Government of American Samoa.

However, that I, again furtherly testify and witness, without my personal appearance in this Hearing, before the Chairman and the Subcommittee Members that the people of American Samoa still, must have a sole authority to renounce (abdicate) the appointed Governor from his Administration as Governor for American Samoa if, or when, his Administration does not possibly comply with the common interests of the people of American Samoa.

D. Secondly, the subject on Lieutenant Governor for American Samoa that I, regardless of not appearing in person in this Hearing, furtherly testify and witness before the Chairman and the Subcommittee that-the subject on Lieutenant Governor should be widely opened to any qualified Samoan Candidate, who has been awarded with a highly recognized DEGREE from a College or University. For whoever, a qualified Samoan Candidate wants to be a Lieutenant Governor for American Samoa, an Official Application should be submitted to the Office of the Secretary of the Interior in Washington, D.C. or vice

versa.

Mr. Chairman, I conclude with great gratification for a chance being widely opened to anyone who wishes to testify and witness in this preliminary Hearing on matter of Governors for American Samoa.

With confidence, I quietly remain.

Very respectfully yours,

S. I. MASANIAI, International Trader & Importer.

OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT GOVERNOR-WESTERN DISTRICT,

March 8, 1972.

Hon. PHILLIP BURTON,

Member of the U.S. Congress,

House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. BURTON: At nine o'clock, Saturday morning, March 4, 1972, all the paramount-hereditary chiefs, or their representatives; high talking chiefs and all

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duly registered and officially recognized matais, under the laws of American Samoa and Samoan customs as well, representing their respective villages and families in the Western District, were duly assembled and did meet at Laloifi and Faleomavaega, the traditional meeting place of the Lealataua County, in the domain of Paramount Chief and District Governor Tuitele, Leone Village, Western District, American Samoa, to discuss and consider H.R. 12493, introduced by Mr. S. Matsunaga on January 19, 1972, and other identical ones. At ten minutes past the hour of two in the afternoon, the following decision was reached.

1. The Western District, with a population of nearly ten thousand, not only protests against the introduction and passing of the said H.R. 12493, but refrains from making any comment or discussion until the coming Convention in July of this year.

2. Although we appreciate the interest of Mr. Matsunaga, et al, in connection with the introduction of H.R. 12493, we fully believe that the matter concerning the election of a Governor and Lieutenant Governor for American Samoa, or a change in form or status of government, or such other related matters, must originate from, or come from the Samoan people themselves and/or the Department of the Interior.

3. We respect and revere the Treaty of Cession signed by our forefathers (several descendants of whom are signors of this letter), their perspicacity and purposes that did cause them to peacefully cease the islands and entrust the future and welfare of their progeny to the magnanimous Government and philanthropic People of the United States. Likewise, we respect and admire the representatives of that magnanimous Government and philanthropic People of the United States when they too, in reciprocation, made a sacred pledge to, inter alia, "respect and uphold the customs and culture of the Samoan people . .

4. We do honestly feel, based on our respect and gratitude to the magnanimous Government and philantropic People of the United States, and our sincere desire not to disrupt our traditional way of life, which the Government and People of the United States so generously and philosophically helped to perpetuate for the last seventy-two years, and our mutual relationship with the Government and People of the United States, that the said H.R. 12493 be kept in abeyance until the Convention in the coming July of this year.

Not all the matais who were present at this memorable meeting have signed their names, but only those of the upper echelon. Respectfully submitted.

TUITELE, M. T., District Governor; LEOSO, M., Senator; SAL-
AVE'A, SENIO; GALOIA, U.; MOANANU APELA; PULEFA-
ASISINA; FONOTI, A., Senator; PAGOFIE, Senator; UIAGA-
LELEI, S.; FUAMATU, VITO; TUUGA, T. SATANAKA;
**PI'O; E. TAVEUVEU; MOI; T. F. MAUGAOTEGA; TAG-
ALOA, M.; TOILOLO, L.; TAUAI, PUIS T. AMOSA; LIU-
LAMA; VAOTU’UA; EVA; TUISE'E; VAIELUA; TUITELE-
LEAPAGA, N., Counsel for West/District; SATELE, M., Senator;
OLO F. LETULE'; SALAVE'A, A.; TUILEFANO; TALIA,
County Chief; FIU, SALUA; TUVEVE, S., Senator; ULGAONO,
T. County Chief; ASI, TOTI; SEUMALO; **MASITALO;
TAIFANE; NOA LAFI; GAGO UEPA ; LALOULU, T. ; SAVALI;
TUTUVANU, M.; SAUITUFUGA; MULIVAITO; SUAFO’A, A.,
Dist. Administrative Assistant: SAGATU; LESEIAU; LEA-
LAIALOA, Secretary for West/District Council.

Congressman BURTON,

APIA, WESTERN SAMOA, February 28, 1972.

Chairman of the Subcommittee on Territories,

Washington, D.C.

DEAR SIR: I have heard that your important committee will be holding public hearings soon on the Samoan Elected Governor Bill, and would like to offer my comments as follows;

I am a registered Democrat in American Samoa and have worked for about four years in American Samoa as a managing editor of various newspapers such

**Present, Concurred, but did not sign.

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