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CHAP. mythology, it is not easy to conjecture. The
w second is a carnelian scarabeus, bought in the

bazar of Nicotia, representing, in front, a sepul-
chral Stélé. One of the letters is evidently a
compound; and four others agree with cha-
racters in the Etruscan alphabet. There is,
moreover, the following inscription upon the
back of this stone, which is evidently. Phænician;
but this also exhibits Etruscan letters. Hence
it seems manifest that the Etruscans and the
Phoenicians were originally the same people.'

73 AP W 747 評

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(1) It is a curious circumstance, that Leonhart Rauwolff, in his Itinerary into the Eastern Countries, (as published by Ray in 1693, Part 2. ch. 13.) calls the Druses of Mount Libanus by the name of TRUSCI. This people now use the Arabic language; but very mistaken notions prevail concerning their origin. A writer in the Quarterly Review for March 1813, p. 196, has communicated some observations upon this subject, of which the author is glad to avail his readers. " The Druses have a peculiar dialect. Hyde (Reliq. Vet. Persarum, p. 461) identifies them with the Curds ; and asserts, that the appellations of Yesidean, Curd, and Calb, (quære, Xálvßes ?) are given by the Turks to both. Those singular fanatics the Assassians were, according to him, of this number; and he finds them in Herodotus as inhabitants of Libapus, under the name of AHPOYXIAIOI.”

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IAP. mythology, it is not easy to conjecture

. The w second is a carnelian scarabæus, bought in the

bazar of Nicotia, representing, in front, a sepul. chral Stélé. One of the letters is evidently a compound; and four others agree with characters in the Etruscan alphabet

. There is moreover, the following inscription upon

the back of this stone, which is evidently

. Phænician; but this also exhibits Etruscan letters. Hence

seems manifest that the Etruscans and the Phænicians were originally the same people.'

[graphic]

Silver Medal found among the Ruins of Citium.

CHAP. II.

72

CYPRUS.

A PW 2417 ##

(1) It is a curious circumstance, that Leonhart Rauwolf

, in bis Itinerary into the Eastern Countries, (as published by Ray in 1988, Part 2. ch. 13.) calls the Druses of Mount Libanus by the name of Trusci. This people now use the Arabic language; but very mistaken notions prevail concerning their origin. A writer in the Quarterly Review for March 1813, p. 196, has communicated some observations upon this subject, of which the author is glad to avail his readers

The Druses have a peculiar dialect. Hyde (Relig. Vet. Persaran,
p. 461) identifies them with the Curds ; and asserts, that the appella-
tions of Yesidean, Curd, and Calb, (quære, XáXvßes ?) are given by the
Turks to both. Those singular fanatics the Assassians were, according
to him, of this number; and he finds them in Herodotus as inhabitats
of Libapus, under the name of AHPOREIAIOI.

Antient Geography of the IslandSituation of

Citium---Phænician Settlements.---Illustrious Citieans-Last remains of the City-Reports concerning Baffa— Minerals of Cyprus-Journey to Nicotia—-Women of Cyprus—Gardens of Larneca-Desolate Appearance of the Country-_-Village of Attién--Primæval Mills--Curious Mode of keeping Bees— Carob TreeAppearance of Nicotia - Banishment of Prostitutes-- Palace of the English DragomanVisit to the Turkish Governor— his Reception of the Author ---Oriental mode of entertaining Guests--Gúyúmjee, or Goldsmiths of Turkey -Antiquities obtained in the Bazar-Polished

D 2

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Antient Geography of the Island.

Stones of Cyprus - Antient Gems found in Nicotia, Camels-Rivers of the Island - Antient Phænician MedalTetradrachm of Tyre

Return to the Fleet-Loss of the Iphigenia. CHAP. It will now perhaps be interesting to ascertain

from what Phænician city the antiquities discovered at Larneca derived their origin; and if the Reader will give an author credit for the difficulties he has encountered, in order to ascertain this point, he may perhaps spare himself some trouble, and render unnecessary any ostentatious detail of the volumes it was necessary to consult. The antient geography of Cyprus is involved in greater uncertainty than seems consistent with its former celebrity among enlightened nations. Neither Greeks nor Romans have afforded any clue by which we can fix the locality of its Eastern cities. Some of them, it is true, had disappeared in a very early period, Long prior to the time of Pliny, the towns of Cinyria, Malium, and Idalium, so necessary in ascertaining the relative position of other places, no longer existed. Both the nature and situation

adds : “

(1) After enumerating fifteen cities belonging to Cyprus, Pliny

fuere et ibi Cinyria, Malium, Idalium." (Plin. lib. v. c. 91. L. Bat. 1635.) Idalium signifies, literally, the the place of the Goddess ;" whence Idalia Venus. In Hebrew it was called Idala, and under this appellation it is mentioned in the Scriptures, (Jos. xix. 15.) as the name of a town belonging to the tribe of Zabulon. See Gale's Court of the Gentiles," also Bochart, Can. lib. i. cap. 3.

CH AP. .

II.

II.

Stones of Cyprus - Antient Gems found in N3
cotia- Camels-Rivers of the Island Antient
Phænician Medal— Tetradrachm of Tyre-

Return to the Fleet-Loss of the Iphigenia. HAP. It will now perhaps be interesting to ascertain w from what Phænician city the antiquities disco

vered at Larneca derived their origin; and i graphy

the Reader will give an author credit for the difficulties he has encountered, in order to ascertain this point, he may perhaps spare himself some trouble, and render unnecessary

tient

he ind.

of important land-marks, alluded to by antient
geographers, are also uncertain. According to
Strabo, the Cleides were two islands upon the north
east coast; Pliny makes their number four ;
and Herodotus mentions a promontory that had
the name given to these islands. "If we consult
the text of Strabo, his description of Cyprus®
appears to be expressed with more than usual
precision and perspicuity. Yet of two renowned
cities, Salamis and Citium, the first distinguished
for the birth of the historian Aristus, and the
last conspicuous by the death of Cimon, neither
the situation of the one nor of the other has
been satisfactorily determined. D’Anville assigns
a different position for these cities, and for
the present towns of Famagosta and Larneca ;
although Drummond),
NENDUS,” as he is styled by a late commentator
upon Strabo“, and also Pococke”, whose proverbial
veracity is beyond all praise, from their own

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HAUD

CONTEM

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any ostentatious detail of the volumes it ma necessary to consult. The antient geography of Cyprus is involved in greater uncertainty than seems consistent with its former celebrity among enlightened nations. Neither Greeks nor Romans have afforded any clue by which we can fix the locality of its Eastern cities. Some of them, it is true, had disappeared in a very early peria! Long prior to the time of Pliny, the towns of Cinyria, Malium, and Idalium, so necessary in ascertaining the relative position of other places, no longer existed.' Both the nature and situation

(2) Strabon. Geog. lib. xiv. p. 970. ed. Oxon.
(3) Travels, &c. in a series of Letters, by Alexander Drummond.
Lond. 1754,

(4) See the Notes to the Oxford Edition of Strabo, p. 972.
(5) Pococke's Description of the East, 2 vols. 1743-45. See vol. II.

p. 213.

(6) It should be observed, however, that Drummond, although he seems to agree with Pococke in the situation of Citium, criticises very severely the freedom used by that author, in presuming to trace the walls of the city from imaginary remains; and also for his erroneous map of the coast. See Drummond's Travels, Lett. xii. p. 248.

(1) After enumerating fifteen cities belonging to Cyprus, Plity adds : " fuere et ibi Cinyria, Malium, Idalium." (Plin. lib. v. c.31. L. Bat. 1635.) Idalium signifies, literally, the "the place of the Goddese;" whence Idalia Venus. In Hebrew it was called Idala, and under this appellation it is mentioned in the Scriptures, (Jos. xix. 15.) as the name of a town belonging to the tribe of Zabulon. See Geldi Court of the Gentiles," also Bochart, C'an. lib. 1. cap. 3.

II.

of CITIUM.

CHAP. ocular testimony reconcile the locality of the

antient and modern places. “At Larneca,Situation observes the former of these writers', “are

undeniable proofs of its having been the antient
Citium.” Perhaps the antiquities now described
may hereafter serve to confirm an opinion of
Drummond's, founded upon very diligent inquiry,
and repeated examination of the country.
During the time he was Consul at Aleppo, he
thrice visited Cyprus, and, upon every occasion,
industriously surveyed the existing documents
of its antient history. The sepulchral remains
occupying so considerable a portion of the
territory where the modern town is situated,
appear to have been those of the Necropolis of
Citium; and this city probably extended from
the port all the way to Larneca, called also
Larnec and Larnico ; implying, in its etymology,
independently of its tombş, “ a place of burial.
Descending to later authors, we find this position
of Citium strongly confirmed by the Abbé Mariti",
who discovered very curious testimony con-

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(1) Drummond's Travels, Lett. xiii. p. 251.

(2) Larneca is the name in most common acceptation among foreign nations; but the inhabitants call it Larnec, and the Abbé Mariti writes it Larnic. The Bay of Salines is also sometimes called Larneca Bay.

(3) Travels through Cyprus, Syria, and Palæstine, by the Abbé Nariti. Eng. edit. Lond. 1791.

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