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HAP. II.

СНАР.

II.

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son and another traveller, joined our party upon the road. The Hadgi, becoming blind

, had been compelled to resign his place, and lived at Limasol. This respectable old man although deprived of sight, was in the habit of journeying from one part of the island to the other, and knew every part of it. He said that the inhabitants were shamefully oppressed.

vation of our Saviour, alluding to this custom in his prediction concerning the destruction of Jerusalem : “ Two women shall be grinding at the mill; the one shall be taken, and the other left."

Mode of

Bees.

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The venerable pair with whom we rested in the village of Attién' were the parents of our mule-drivers, and owners of the mules. Thes made us welcome to their homely supper

, by placing two planks across a couple of benches

1 and setting thereon boiled pumpkins, eggs

, and some wine of the island in a hollow gourd val We observed upon the ground the sort of

stones used for grinding corn, called Querns in Scotland, common also in Lapland, and in al parts of Palæstine. These are the primaral mills of the world; and they are still found in all corn countries, where rude and antien

In these little cottages we found very large Curious establishments for bees, but all the honey thus keeping made is demanded by the Governor ; so that an apiary is only considered as the cause of an additional tax. The manner, however, in which the honey is collected, is curious, and worthy of imitation, and it merits a particular description : the contrivance is simple, and was doubtless suggested by the more antient custom, still existing in the Crimea, of harbouring bees in cylindrical hives made from the bark of trees. They build up a wall formed entirely of earthen cylinders, each about three feet in length, placed, one above the other, horizontally, and closed at their extremities with mortar.

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customs have not been liable to those changes introduced by refinement. The employment of grinding with them is confined solely to females, and the practice illustrates the obser

:

(2) Matt. xxiv. 41.

(3) The bee-hives of Egypt, and of Palæstine, are of the same kind. “* Those of Egypt,” says Hasselquist, “ are made of coal-dust and clay, which being well blended together, they form of the mixture a hollow cylinder, of a span diameter, and as long as they please, from six to twelve feet: this is dried in the sun, and it becomes so hard, that it may be handled at will. I saw some thousands of these hives at a village between Damiata and Mansora." Hasselquist's Voy, and Trar. p. 236. Lond. 1766.

(1) Marili writes the name of this place Atene. See vol. lop. tio

58

CYPRUS.

II.

CHAP. This wall is then covered with a shed, and

upwards of one hundred hives may thus be

maintained within a very small compass. Close Carob-tree. to this village grew the largest Carob-tree we

noticed in all our travels. It is, by some, called St. John'sbread-tree; the Ceratonia Siliqua of Linnæus. It was covered with fruit, the pods being then green, and it had attained the size of our largest English oaks. We could neither discover nor hear of any antiquities near this village ; excepting the ruins of an old Greek church, with pictures of saints upon the walls ; and one large reservoir for water, pointed out

antient work, although probably of Venetian origin. It is still in a perfect state, lined with square blocks of stone, about twenty-five feet deep, and fifteen feet wide; being situate in a field close to the village.

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Two hours before sun-rise, we again set out for Nicotia. The road lay through an open country; but high mountains were everywhere in view, as on the preceding evening.

Some of these, as we drew nearer to them, exhibited very remarkable forms, standing insulated, and with flat tops, like what are usually called Table mountains. Upon our right we observed one that rose out of a fine plain, having a most

CHAP

II.

1.

compass. Close

or

HAP. This wall is then covered with a shed, and

upwards of one hundred hives may thus be maintained within

a very

small E-tree. to this village grew the largest Carob-tree we

noticed in all our travels. It is, by some, called St. John'sbread-tree; the Ceratonia Siliqua of Linnæus. It was covered with fruit, the pods being then green, and it had attained the size of our largest English oaks. We could neither discover nor hear of any antiquities near this village ; excepting the ruins of an old

the Greek church, with pictures of saints upon walls; and one large reservoir for water,

ance of

perfectly conical form, excepting that its vertex appeared truncated parallel to its base. Upon the road we noticed distinct masses of the purest transparent selenites, crystallized sulphat of lime, as diaphanous as

the most limpid specimens from Montmartre, near Paris. It seemed as if they had been dropped by caravans passing the road; although we could learn nothing, either of the place whence they were derived, or the purpose for which they were intended. A ridge of mountains bounded all the view in front of our route : at length, at the distance of two hours and a half from Attién, we beheld the city of NicoTIA, situate Appearin the middle of one of the fine plains common Nicotia. in this part of the island, at the base of one extremity of the mountain barrier. advanced towards it we were struck with the magnificence of its fortifications, which, although neglected. still remain nearly entire ; surpassing, in extent and beauty, those of almost every other city. The moat is half a mile wide ; it is now dry, or at best but an unwholesome swamp.

Beneath the walls the bed of this moat abruptly terminates in a deep and wide fosse. The ramparts are still mounted with a few pieces of artillery. The road winds round the walls towards the gate, which had once a portcullis. We found the entrance filled with

pointed out as an antient work, although probably of Venetian origin. It is still in a perfect state, lined with square blocks of stone, about twenty-five feet deep, and fifteen feet wide; being situate in a field close to the village.

As we

Two hours before sun-rise, we again set out for Nicotia. The road lay through an open country; but high mountains were everywhere in view, as on the preceding evening. Some of these, as we drew nearer to them, exhibited very remarkable forms, standing insulated, and with flat tops, like what are usually called "able mountains. Upon our right we observed c that rose out of a fine plain, having a most

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Banishment of Prostitutes.

A

CHAP. beggars. The guard demands a toll from all

Greeks passing through. As we rode into the
town, we met a long train of women, dressed
in white robes, the beautiful costume of the
capital, filling the air with their lamentations.
Some of them were of the middle age, but all
were handsome : as they advanced, they ex-
posed their faces and breasts to public view,
tearing their hair, and weeping piteously. In
the midst of the procession rode a Turk upon
an ass, smoking his long pipe in the most tran-
quil manner, and wholly indifferent to their cries.
Upon inquiring the cause of this tumult, we were
told that these women were all prostitutes,
whom the Governor had banished the city, and
whom they were therefore conducting beyond

Their dress was modelled after a
very antient form, and highly elegant: it con-
sisted entirely of fine white linen, so disposed
as to veil at once the whole figure, unless when
purposely cast aside ; when it fell to the ground
in long graceful folds.

the gates.

I

Palace of the Eng

goman.

We went to the house of Signor Sékis, (the lish Dra. English Dragoman, as he is vulgarly called,) a

rich Armenian merchant, who enjoys the English
protection for transacting whatsoever business
their nation may have with the Governor.
His house was
in all respects

a palace,

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in all respects a palace,

CHAP.

II.

.

1

of ti

LAP. beggars. The guard demands a toll from all w Greeks passing through. As we rode into the

town, we met a long train of women, dressed in white robes, the beautiful costume of the capital, filling the air with their lamentations Some of them were of the middle age, but al were handsome: as they advanced, they esposed their faces and breasts to public nier, tearing their hair, and weeping piteously

. I the midst of the procession rode a Turk upen

near

an ass, smoking his long pipe in the most trau
quil manner, and wholly indifferent to their cries
Upon inquiring the cause of this tumult

, we were
told that these women were all prostitutas
whom the Governor had banished the city

, and whom they were therefore conducting berond the gates. Their dress was modelled after a very antient form, and highly elegant : it ou sisted entirely of fine white linen, so dispered as to veil at once the whole figure, unless when purposely cast aside ; when it fell to the ground

displaying the highest degree of Oriental magnificence. The apartments were not only spacious, but they were adorned with studied elegance; the floors being furnished with the finest mats brought from Grand Caïro, and the diváns covered with satin, set round with embroidered cushions. The windows of the rooms, as in all Oriental houses, were the roof, and small, although numerous, and placed close to each other. They had double casements, one being of painted glass, surrounded by carved work, as in the old Gothic palaces of England, which, perhaps, derived their original form from the East, during the Crusades. So many instances occur to confirm this opinion, that we may be liable to unnecessary repetition, by too frequent allusion to this style of building. The custom of having the floor raised in the upper part of a chamber, where the superiors sit, as in our old halls, is strictly Oriental : it is the same in the tents of the Tahtars. We were permitted to view the Charem. This always consists of a summer and a winter apartment.

The first was a large square room, surrounded by a diván ; the last an oblong chamber, where the diváns were placed parallel to each other, one being on either side, lengthways : at the upper extremity was the fire-place, resembling our antient English hearths.

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in long graceful folds.

of

We went to the house of Signor Sékis, (the English Dragoman, as he is vulgarly called). rich Armenian merchant, who enjoys the English protection for transacting whatsoever business their nation may have with the Govern.

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