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CHAP

II.

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- After thus endeavouring to make us feel ou

inferiority, he next strove to dazzle our sensi
with his splendour and greatness

. Haring is. clapped his hands', a swarm of attendans

most magnificently dressed, came into the room bearing gilded goblets filled with lemonade and sorbet, which they presented to w.. high priest of the Dervishes then entered, and prostrated himself before the Governor, touching his lips with his fingers, crossing his hands upes his breast, and raising his thumbs afterwards or his ears. All these marks of reverence enda he rose and took his station upon the dita, on the left side of the Governor. Next came a fresh party of slaves, bringing long pipes of

us' again with others of white satin, still more sumptuous than before. Next they brought coffee, in golden cups studded with diamonds; and the mantles were more taken away.

After this, there came slaves kneeling before us with burning odours in silver censers, which they held beneath our noses ; and finally, a man, passing rapidly round, bespattered our faces, hands, and clothes, with rose-water-a compliment so little expected at the time, and so zealously administered, that we began to wipe from our eyes the honours which had almost blinded us. The principal dragoman belonging to the Governor next presented to each of us an embroidered handkerchief;

'gifts,” he said, “ “ by which Infidels of rank were always distinguished in their interviews with his Master.” The handkerchief consisted of embroidered muslin, and was inclosed in a piece of red crape.

These presents we in vain solicited permission to

jasmine wood with amber heads, to all the party; these were suddenly followed by another box of myrmidons in long white vests, having white turbans on their heads, who covered us with magnificent mantles of sky-blue silk, bespangla' and embroidered with gold. They also pre sented to us preserved fruits and other sett

1 meats; snatching away the embroidered mantles

(1) This method of summoning slaves to the presence of their master is common all over the Turkish empire.

(2) Among the Romans, the master of the house often piqued his self upon furnishing his guests with magnificent habits. They cute sisted of a kind of loose mantles, like those of Cyprus. Maria 1 reproaches Luscus with having more than once carried of two free

the house where he had supped. (Epig. 57. lib. viii.) It was also customary in the East to change their robes at feasts. The master of the house gave one to each of his guests : none were to appear without it. Thus, in the Parable of the Marriage Feast (Matt. xxii.), the guest who had it not was driven out by order of the king who gave the feast; not being found worthy of admittance there, no garment having been given to him, as to the others. See D'Arnay's Life of the Romans p. 118. Lond. 1764.

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II.

CHAP. decline

decline ; adding, that “as private individuals,
meanly habited, in the view of travelling ex-
peditiously through the island, we hoped he
would not form his ideas of Englishmen of rank
either from our appearance or pretensions.”
When all his servants had retired, and the
ceremonies of opening and shutting silver
utensils, of presenting coffee, conserves, and
tobacco, were ended, which generally occupy
half an hour, the Governor began a eulogy upon
Lord Nelson and Sir Sidney Smith. We found it
difficult to gain an opportunity for stating the
cause of our coming; for with Turkish grandees
an hour is soon passed, without the interchange
of ten words. At last we obtained a hearing,
and spoke of our intention to visit Baffa. We
had no sooner mentioned this place, than we
found that all intercourse with it, and with the
western side of the island, was cut off by the
plague, which had begun to shew itself even
in the neighbourhood of Nicotia : we therefore
resolved to return to our more humble host in
the village of Attién the same night; when, to our
great surprise, the Governor requested that we
would spend a few days with him ; and, as we
stated this to be impossible, he even threatened
to detain the frigate at Salines for that purpose.
We were however resolute in our determination ;
and therefore representing to him the illness of

II.

II.

our Captain, and out utter inability to remain
an instant after the Ceres had got her cargo on
board, we took our leave ; accompanied by an
officer of his guard, whom he permitted to
attend us among the goldsmiths of the place, in
search of medals and other antiquities.

HAP. decline ; adding, that “as private individuak

meanly habited, in the view of travelling er peditiously through the island, we hoped by would not form his ideas of Englishmen of rant either from our appearance or pretensions When all his servants had retired, and the ceremonies of opening and shutting site utensils, of presenting coffee, conserves, ni tobacco, were ended, which generally oceny half an hour, the Governor began a eulogy upe

It is to these artificers, bearing the name of Gdylmjee, Gúyümjee, almost universally in Turkey, that smiths of

Turkey. the peasants of the country, and lower order of people in the towns, carry all the pieces of gold or silver they may chance to find in the soil, to be exchanged for modern trinkets. They are generally men in a very small way of trade, sitting in a little stall, with a crucible before them, a touchstone', and a handful of very ordinary tools. Their chief occupation consists in making coarse silver rings, of very base metal, for the women, and in setting signets for Turks of all denominations. There is hardly a Moslem who does not bear upon one of his fingers this kind of ornament. The Turkish signet is

Lord Nelson and Sir Sidney Smith. We found i difficult to gain an opportunity for stating the cause of our coming ; for with Turkish grandes an hour is soon passed, without the interchane of ten words. At last we obtained a hearing

, and spoke of our intention to visit Baffa

. W had no sooner mentioned this place, than a found that all intercourse with it, and with the western side of the island, was cut off br the plague, which had begun to shew itself eve in the neighbourhood of Nicotia : we therebro resolved to return to our more humble host i the village of Attién the same night; when, to me? great surprise, the Governor requested that we would spend a few days with him; and, 13 * stated this to be impossible, he even threatens to detain the frigate at Salines for that purpose We were however resolute in our determinatio, and therefore representing to him the illnev rf

(1) Various substances are in use under the name of touchstone, and of course it has various appellations. Mineralogists have called it Lapis Lydius, Corneus trapezius, primitive basalt, basanite, trap, schistus, &c. The substance most employed by Oriental goldsmiths is a dark and very compact basalt.

II.

CHAP. generally a carnelian stone', inscribed with a

few words from the Korán, a proverb in Arabic,
or a couplet in Persian. We found, as usual,
ample employment among these men ; and were
so much occupied in the pursuit, that we even
neglected to visit the Cathedral of St. Sophia,
built in the

the Gothic style by the Emperor
Justinian, when he raised the edifice of the same
name in Constantinople. It is said that the
monuments of English warriors who fought
during the crusades still exist within this
building We have the testimony both of
Drummond and of Mariti for the architecture

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(1) To supply these stones, they frequently disfigure or conceal the finest antique gems; either by cutting them into a more diminutive form, or by hiding the work of the antient lapidary in the setting, and turning the obverse side outward for the writing.

(2) “ The most beautiful edifice here is, without doubt, the Church of St. Sophia, where the kings of Cyprus were formerly crowned. It is built in the Gothic style, and has three large naves. It contains the tombs of the Lusignans, and of several antient Cypriots and noble Venetians. The choir and the altar were destroyed when the city was taken. This rch then became the principal mosque ; and Mustapha, the Turkish general, went to it for the first time, to offer thanks to the Almighty, on the fourteenth of September, 1570." Mariti's Travels, vol. 1. p. 98. It is said by Dapper (Descrip. des Isles de l'Archipel. p. 32. (Amst. 1733) to contain an antient tomb of very beautiful jasper, of one entire piece, eight feet and a half long, four feet and a quarter wide, and five feet high. Dapper, perhaps, alludes to the beautiful kind of marble called Rosso Antico by the Italiane.

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II.

cribed with erb in Ante und, as usual

hen; and were

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that we eren of St. Sophis

the Emper ce of the sam

exhibited in its construction: the cathedrals CHAP.
both of Famagosta and Nicotia are described as
Gothic. If it be true, therefore, that the
Nicotian church was erected by Justinian, we
have authority for the existence of that style of
architecture, in a high degree of perfection, so
long ago as the middle of the sixth century;
six hundred and forty years before the conquest
of Cyprus by Richard the First ; and certainly
long anterior to the introduction of

any
specimen of the architecture, called Gothic, into
Great Britain. Other examples of still higher
antiquity exist in Egypt, in Palestine, and
in India.

said that the

who fought within this

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e architectur

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The only Manufactures which we noticed in Nicotia were those of Turkey leather, of small carpets, and of printed cottons. The red leather made here, like that of Acre, is remarkable for its brilliant and lively colour. Mariti describes it as superior in this respect to the leather which is manufactured in Barbarys. The carpets were barely large enough to cover an English hearth; but they were valued at forty and fifty piastres each. The workmanship was, however, excellent. We visited the cotton manufactory. The process did not appear to

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2 first time to read September

, 15H per Decris de in antient tom)

and a half kan Dapper, pertanto * Antio b

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(3) Mariti's Travels, vol. I. p. 102. Lond. 1791.

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