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VII.

and full of loose stones: get the cultivation CHAP.
was everywhere marvellous : it afforded one of
the most striking pictures of human industry Cultivation
which it is possible to behold. The limestone of Judæa.
rocks and stony valleys of Judæa were entirely
covered with plantations of figs, vines, and olive-

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be fruitless. Phocas, who is generally accurate, states the distance between
SAMARIA (i. e. Sichem, vel Neapolis) and JERUSALEM most erroneously;
making it only equal to eighty-four stadia, or ten miles and a half : 'ATÒ
της Σαμαρείας έως της αγίας πόλεως εισί σταδία όγδοήκοντα τέσσαρα. .
"A Samariâ ad sacram civitatem stadia numerantur quatuor et octoginta.”
(Phocæ Descript. T. S. cap. 14.) This would only allow a journey of
three hours and a half. Maundrell makes it eleven hours and thirty-
five minutes, according to the following statement from his Journal.
(See pp. 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, Journ. from Alep. to Jerus. Oxf. 1721.)

Hours.
Naplosa to Kane Leban - 4
Kane Leban to Bethel 14
Bethel to Beer

23
Beer to Jerusalem

3}

11. 35 min.
Adapting, therefore, Maundrell's time to Reland's scale, the distance
would be little more than thirty-four miles and a half. We considered
it to be much more ; but it is difficult to obtain accurate measure, even
by actual observation of the country, owing to its mountainous and
rugged nature.

(2) If the following passage from Phocas afforded the only internal
evidence to be found in his Work, of his having visited the country, tra-
vellers, who follow him, will deem it satisfactory. 'h dioồog rãoa 1106-
στρωτος, και ταύτα,κατάξηρος ούσα ή πάσα τοιαύτη χώρα, και αυχμηρά
εστί και κατάμπελος και υπόδενδρος. «Via est omnis lapidibus strata ;
et, licet tota ea regio siccitate arescat, et squalleat, ubique tamen vitibus
et arboribus constipatur.” Phocæ Descr. Terr. Sanct. c. 14. Colon. 1653.
The extraordinary cultivation of this singular country, and the mode of it,
is also noticed by Maundrell. See Journ. from Alep. to Jerus. pp. 64, 65.

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СНАР.
VII.

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trees; not a single spot seemed to be neglected.
The hills, from their bases to their utmost sum-
mits, were overspread with gardens : all of these
were free from weeds, and in the highest state
of cultivation. Even the sides of the most bar-
ren mountains had been rendered fertile, by
being divided into terraces, like steps rising one
above another, upon which soil had been accu-
mulated with astonishing labour. Among the
standing crops, we noticed millet, cotton, linseed,
and tobacco ; and, occasionally, small fields of
barley. A sight of this territory can alone con-
vey any adequate idea of its surprising produce :
it is truly the Eden of the East, rejoicing in the
abundance of its wealth. The effect of this
upon the people was strikingly pourtrayed in
every countenance : instead of the depressed and
gloomy looks of Djezzar Pasha's desolated plains,
health, hilarity, and peace, were visible in
the features of the inhabitants. Under a wise
and beneficent government, the produce of the
Holy LAND would exceed all calculation. Its
perennial harvest'; the salubrity of its air®; its

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(1) “The seasons," says Josephus, "seem to maintain a competition, which should be most productive." See his account of the country around the Lake of Gennesareth, (lib. ii. de Bell. c. 18.) as cited in a former chapter of this work.

(2) We saw neither mosquitoes nor locusts; nor did the croaking of toads or frogs denote the vicinity of any of those deadly marshes which poison the atmosphere on so many shores of the Mediterranean.

CHAP.
VII.

limpid springs : its rivers, lakes, and matchless plains ; its hills and vales ;— all these, added to the serenity of its climate, prove this land to be indeed

a field which the Lord hath blessed : God hath given it of the dew of heaven, and the fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn and wine."

The first part of our journey led through the valley lying between the two mountains Ebal and Gerizim. We passed the Sepulchre of

(3) Gen. xxvii. 27, 28.

(4) Ebal, sometimes written Gebal, is upon the north; and Gerizim, or Garizim, upon the south. The streets of Napolose run parallel to the latter ; which overlooks the town. (Vid. Joseph. lib. v. Antiq. c. 9.) “ And it shall come to pass, when the Lord thy God hath brought thee in unto the land whither thou goest to possess it, that thou shalt put the blessing upon Mount GERIZIM, and the curse upon EBAL.(Deut. xi. 29.) Also, in the record of the covenant, (Deut. xxvii. 5.) the people are directed to build an altar of whole stones upon Mount EBAL. “ And Moses charged the people (ibid. v. 11.) the same day, saying, These tshall stand upon Mount GERIZIM, to bless the people;" “ and (ibid. v. 13.) these shall stand upon Mount EBAL, to curse.” (See also Josh. viii. 33.) The Samaritans have now a place of worship upon Mount GERIZIM. (See Maundrell, Journ. from Alepp. to Jerus.p. 59.) Reland (tom. II. p. 1006, tom. I, p. 344, Traj. Bat. 1714) wrote the name of this mountain both Garizim and Gerizim. The Samaritans, according to Phocas, believed that upon Mount Gerizim, which stands upon the right hand of a person facing the east, Abraham prepared the sacrifice of his son Isaac. "Ων το δεξιώτερον υπάρχει το όρος ενώ οι Σαμαρείς λέγουσι χρηματίσαι το 'Αβραάμ τον θεόν, και την θυσίαν ζητήσαι του 'Ισαάκ. In dexteriore montium Samaritanorum ea traditio est, Deus Abrahamo responsum dedit, et Isaacum in sacrificium petiit.” Phocæ Desc. Terr. Sanct, c. 13. Col. 1653.

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CHAP.
VII.

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trees ; not a single spot seemed to be neglected.
The hills, from their bases to their utmost sum-
mits, were overspread with gardens : all of these
were free from weeds, and in the highest state
of cultivation. Even the sides of the most bar-
ren mountains had been rendered fertile, by
being divided into terraces, like steps rising one
above another, upon which soil had been accu-
mulated with astonishing labour. Among the
standing crops, we noticed millet, cotton, linseed,
and tobacco; and, occasionally, small fields of
barley. A sight of this territory can alone con-
vey any adequate idea of its surprising produce :
it is truly the Eden of the East, rejoicing in the
abundance of its wealth. The effect of this
upon the people was strikingly pourtrayed in
every countenance : instead of the depressed and
gloomy looks of Djezzar Pasha's desolated plains,
health, hilarity, and peace, were visible in
the features of the inhabitants. Under a wise
and beneficent government, the produce of the
Holy LAND would exceed all calculation. Its
perennial harvest'; the salubrity of its air”; its

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(1) "The seasons," says Josephus, " seem to maintain a competition, which should be most productive." See his account of the country around the Lake of Gennesareth, (lib. iii, de Bell. c. 18.) as cited in a former chapter of this Work.

(2) We saw neither mosquitoes nor locusts; nor did the croaking of toads or frogs denote the vicinity of any of those deadly marshes which poison the atmosphere on so many shores of the Mediterranean.

e negle?

CHAP.
VII.

ghest so

limpid springs : its rivers, lakes, and matchless
plains ; its hills and vales ;-all these, added to
the serenity of its climate, prove this land to be
indeed " a field which the Lord hath blessed :
God hath given it of the dew of heaven, and the
fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn and
wine.”

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The first part of our journey led through the valley lying between the two mountains Ebal and Gerizim. We passed the Sepulchre of

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(3) Gen. xxvii. 27, 28.

(4) Ebal, sometimes written Gebal, is upon the north; and Gerizim, or Garizim, upon the south. The streets of Napolose run parallel to the latter ; which overlooks the town. (Vid. Joseph. lib. v. Antiq. c. 9.) And it shall come to pass, when the Lord thy God hath brought thee in unto the land whither thou goest to possess it, that thou shalt put the blessing upon Mount GERIZIM, and the curse upon EBAL.” (Deut. xi. 29.) Also, in the record of the covenant, (Deut. xxvii. 5.) the people are directed to build an altar of whole stones upon Mount EBAL. “ And Moses charged the people (ibid. v. 11.) the same day, saying, These tshall stand upon Mount GERIZIM, to bless the people;" " and (ibid. v. 13.) these shall stand upon Mount EBAL, to curse.” (See also Josh. viii. 33.) The Samaritans have now a place of worship upon Mount GERIZIM. (See Maundrell, Journ. from Alepp. to Jerus.p. 59.) Reland (tom. II. p. 1006, tom. I, p. 344, Traj. Bat. 1714) wrote the name of this mountain both Garizim and Gerizim. The Samaritans, according to Phocas, believed that upon Mount Gerizim, which stands upon the right hand of a person facing the east, Abraham prepared the sacrifice of his 80n Isaac. "Ων το δεξιώτερον υπάρχει το όρος ενώ οι Σαμαρείς λέγουσι χρηματίσαι το 'Αβραάμ τον θεόν, και την θυσίαν ζητήσαι του 'loaár. “ In dexteriore montium Samaritanorum ea traditio est, Deus Abrahamo responsum dedit, et Isaacum in sacrificium petiit.” Phocæ Desc. Terr. Sanct. c. 13. Col. 1653.

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