Psychology Applied to Education

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D. C. Heath, 1892 - 214 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 5 - Mens sana in corpore sano, a sound mind in a sound body, will be always able to make a good citizen.
Σελίδα 196 - If severity carried to the highest pitch does prevail, and works a cure upon the present unruly distemper, it is often bringing in the room of it a worse and more dangerous disease, by breaking the mind...
Σελίδα 12 - Our conclusions are, then — that, while the clothing of children should never be in such excess as to create oppressive warmth, it should always be sufficient to prevent any general feeling of cold...
Σελίδα 165 - nothing hurts young people more than to be watched continually about their feelings, to have their countenances scrutinized, and the degrees of their sensibility measured by the surveying eye of the unmerciful spectator.
Σελίδα 53 - There never will be any such maxim, in regard to the other senses. To use the ear instead of the eye, in any case where the latter is available, is as preposterous, as it would be for our migratory birds, in their overland passage, to walk rather than to fly. We laugh at the...
Σελίδα 196 - Such a sort of slavish discipline makes a slavish temper. The child submits, and dissembles obedience, whilst the fear of the rod hangs over him ; but when that is removed, and, by being out of sight, he can promise himself impunity, he gives the greater scope to his natural inclination, which by this way is not at all altered, but on the contrary heightened and increased in him ; and after such restraint, breaks out usually with the more violence.
Σελίδα 52 - ... and formless are all the ideas they present to you. But the eye is the great thoroughfare between the outward and material infinite, and the inward and spiritual infinite. The mind often acquires, by a glance of the eye, what volumes of books and months of study could not reveal so livingly through the ear. Every thing that comes through the eye, too, has a vividness, a clear outline, a just collocation of parts, — each in its proper place, — which the other senses can never communicate....
Σελίδα 53 - Without an accurate acquaintance with the visible and tangible properties of things, our conceptions must...
Σελίδα 40 - ... to all it is a familiar truth that a forced 'development of intelligence in childhood entails disastrous results — either physical feebleness, or ultimate stupidity, or early death — it appears not to be perceived that throughout youth the same truth holds. Yet it is certain that it must do so. There is a given order in which, and a given rate at which, the faculties unfold. If the course of education conforms itself to that of order and rate, well.
Σελίδα 40 - Yet it unquestionably does so. There is a given order in which, and a given rate at which, the faculties unfold. If the course of education conforms itself to that order and rate, well. If not — if the higher faculties are early taxed by presenting an order of knowledge more complex and abstract than can be readily assimilated ; or if, by excess of culture, the intellect in general is developed to a degree beyond that which is natural to its age ; the abnormal advantage gained will inevitably be...

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