The French Revolution: Chapters from the Author's History of England During the Eighteenth Century

Εξώφυλλο
D. Appleton, 1904 - 585 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 209 - Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race...
Σελίδα 212 - We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason; because we suspect that this stock in each man is small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations and of ages.
Σελίδα 210 - To be attached to the subdivision, to love the little platoon we belong to in society, is the first principle (the germ as it were) of public affections. It is the first link in the series by which we proceed towards a love to our country, and to mankind.
Σελίδα 213 - The nature of man is intricate, the objects of society are of the greatest possible complexity, and therefore no simple disposition or direction of power can be suitable either to man's nature or to the quality of his affairs.
Σελίδα 288 - If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men will be fitted to it ; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear, every hope will forward it; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty current in human affairs, will appear rather to resist the decrees of Providence itself, than the mere designs of men.
Σελίδα 213 - ... it is with infinite caution that any man ought to venture upon pulling down an edifice which has answered in any tolerable degree for ages the common purposes of society, or on building it up again, without having models and patterns of approved utility before his eyes.
Σελίδα 211 - You see, Sir, that in this enlightened age I am bold enough to confess that we are generally men of untaught feelings : that, instead of casting away all our old prejudices, we cherish them to a very considerable degree...
Σελίδα 201 - Our present danger from the example of a people, whose character knows no medium, is, with regard to government, a danger from anarchy; a danger of being led through an admiration of successful fraud and violence, to an imitation of the excesses of an irrational, unprincipled, proscribing, confiscating, plundering, ferocious, bloody, and tyrannical democracy.
Σελίδα 267 - What is government more than the management of the affairs of a nation? It is not, and from its nature cannot be, the property of any particular man or family, but of the whole community...
Σελίδα 214 - By a slow but well-sustained progress, the effect of each step is watched ; the good or ill success of the first gives light to us in the second; and so, from light to light, we are conducted with safety through the whole series.

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