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POMPEII.

as great luxuries by the ancient Roman Ix No. 22 we represented a view of epicures, who took the drinks medici. the excavated remains of the Temple of nally to prolong their appetite. Vitel. Jupiter, the Pantheon, &c. in the once lius thus contrived to sup the whole splendid city of Pompeii. The ac- night. Sweet liquors and stewed meats companying view represents part of were also sold here. In front of the the streets, shops, &c. with Vesuvius fountain is seen the ancient pavement, in the distance.

which is formed of large polygonal

blocks of the lava of Yesuvius, in Explanation of the References.

which may be distinguished the ruts 1. The summit of Vesuvius, consists of the ancient wheels. Few of the ing of three heads; and separated streets were more than fifteen feet wide, from the other two (2) called Somma and some only eight feet. On one or and Ottaianus, The circumference of both sides there was a foot-way for Vesuvius at the base is about thirty passengers, seldom more than two or miles,

three feet wide, with stepping-stones 3. Bosca Reale.

from one curb to the other, to allow 4. Part of the Town Wall.

passengers to cross the street without 5, Tower on the Town Wall. stepping on the carriage-way.

6. The House of Panza. On one of 10. Gate or Entrance to the Forum. the piers are painted these words :- 11. Prisons, in which were found PANSAM AED. ParaTVRS ROG. This some skeletons of prisoners, with the custom of the Pompeians, of writing irons attached to the wall, by which similar inscriptions on the walls, is not they were confined. the least curious of those which these 12. A Milk Shop: on the pier of ruins alone have brought to light. On this shop is a basso relievo, of terra the walls of the habitations were painted cotta, representing a cow or a goat, the names of the proprietors, the num- seeming to indicate the sale of milk. bers of the houses, manufactories, 13. Ancient shops, appropriated to notices of plays, of gladiatorial games the sale of eatables; in the counter are and hunts :-as this, “ The gladiatorial sunk large fixed jars, as here shewn, family of N. Festus Ampliatus will re- which held the materials sold. peat the combats on the 16th of the 14. An Ancient Shop. calends of June : there will be u hunt, and the awning will be put up." We find announcement also of sales and of

LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS houses to let; in one of the last de

AND CURIOSITES. scription, a certain Julia Felix offers - Why, what would you ? to let nine hundred shops, with their

List to a brief tale. Shakspeare. appurtenances, for six years.

In an age when a single Novel brings 7. Kitchen in Panza's House. The thousands to The Great Unknoron," stoves still remain very perfect. On it may not be amiss to inquire what the wall is a painting, representing two sum Paradise Lost, the first poem in figures sacrificing on an altar; under. the English, if not in all the languages neath are two serpents, indicating that in the known world, produced its authe genius of health presided over the thor. When Milton wrote this sublime culinary operations. On the side is and incomparable poem, the British painted a ham, or leg of mutton, press was subject to a censorship, and

8. A Baker's shop. In it are preserved be experienced some difficulty in getthe oven, as also three mills, in which ting it licensed; for Milton's political the ancients ground corn.

principles being well known, those 9. A Fountain, adorned with a small who possessed the power of rejecting subject of sculpture in low relief, re- works submitted to them, probably presenting an eagle bearing off a hare suspected that treason lurked under in its beak. Sir William Gell imagines, the covers. It was, however, licensed that, by this allegory, the ancients and sold to a bookseller; yes, sold to wished to inspire with terror those who one Samuel Simmons, for the immemight deface an object of such public diate payment of the enormous sum of utility, indicating that the law would five pounds, with a condition, that if punish those who should destroy the one thousand three hundred copies were fountain. Behind it is seen the shop sold, the author should receive fire of a Thermopolite, or vender of warm pounde more; and the same sum for a drinks. Such shops were frequented second, or third edition. The sale of . the poem, in the space of two years, the first publisher who engaged his

gave Milton a right to the second five pen, and afforded him that protection pounds, a receipt for which was signed which his finances required. The reApril 26, 1669. The second edition sult was a lasting friendship between was printed in the year 1674; but them. Milton did not live to receive the sti. pulated five pounds. The third edition

SKETCHES OF SOCIETY. appeared in 1678, at which time the copy-right devolved on Milton's widow, and she sold herentire right to Simmons CHELSEA HOSPITAL. . for eight pounds. Thus the sum total

.“Rude am I in speech, received by Milton and his heirs for And little of this great world can I apeak the work, which brought him a repu. More than pertains to feals of broiland battle." tation as imperishable as the universe, On advancing to the gates, I obwas eighteen pounds!

served my friend Pat with four or five little urchins drawn up in a line, each

with a broomstick or a mop-handle, THE SPIRITUAL COURT. going through the various evolutions When Moore was writing the ex- of the drill ground. He was in the cellent Tragedy of the Gamester, he first position for facing to the right, was suffering under a protracted and and the youngsters, with mouths and expensive prosecution in Doctors' eyes wide open, were watching the Commons, for marrying two sisters. motion. Though seventy winters had He was called upon by his proctor, spent their storms upon his head, he one morning when he was engaged in stood erect and firm, and at that mowriting, and the proctor having a leisure ment would have been a fine study for hour upon his hands, the poet read the the artist.” “To the right, face !" said four acts of his Tragedy, which he had he. It brought him full in my front: just completed. The proctor was so his hand was flourished to his hat in an affected by the tale, that he exclaimed instant, and from a countenance ex. “ Good Heavens! Mr. Moore, how pressive of command it changed to one can you possibly add to this couples' of the most lively pleasure. “Oh. distress in the last act!” “Oh! very joy to the hour that I see your honour easily,”, replied Moore, "for there 1 again! Faith, but delight is bateing intend to put them into the Spiritual the roll upon the drum of my heart, Court!"

and every swate sensation is answering the muster.” The chidren were now

charging each other in front and rear, DR. JOHNSON.

which armoying the veteran, “ Arrah When Johnson, the Colossus of Eng. be aisey, and don't you be after maklish Literature, came to London to ing such a hubaboo,--double quick cominence his career as an author, the time, march!” and off they set as wild first person he applied to for employ- 'as young colts. “Are any of these ment was a Mr. Wilcox, who was a your's ?” enquired I. « Oh no, your bookseller of some eminence in the honour; when the turf covers poor Strand. Mr. Wilcox, surveying the ould Pat, his name will become 'stinrobust frame of Johnson for an instant, guished. But see at yon gassoon; oh, with a significant look, replied to it makes my heart ake to look at him, Johnson's question - Young man, you for be has niver a friend in the world, had better buy a porter's knot." This, nor in Ireland eather, save and beside to the man who had taste and know- myself your honour. Sure is'nt he a ledge of the world sufficient to write darling of a boy, and the very image “ Rasselas," must have been cutting of my own dare Norah. Come here in the extreme ; but it did not dis- Casey, and spake to the gentleman, courage a mind like Johnson's, for in don't stand rubbing your pate there. 1738 he transmitted his poem of “ Lon- Run off, you ragged rascal, and let his don" to Mr. Cave as the production of honour alone; don't stand grubbing an author “ labouring under disad- there with your ten toes, like a pig in vantageous circumstances of fortune," a pratee garden. Faith, but he's off; and calling upon him to “encourage and now perhaps your honour would learning and relieve distress, by his like to know a little of his history, usual generosity." This Mr. Cave was seeing that it makes a figure in my own.

But first I'll go back to the end, and so de-campo, and rode through the scenes tell you straight forward in a circuitous ofcarnage to stop the murderers' hands, manner, that we mayn't set out in a Oh wasn't she a darling of a soul! Ax roundabout way. Sure and wasn't it General B- , your honour, for he at Monte Video that you left me last? knew her well, by token--but that's And faith I might have staid there till none of my business to notice, only'twas death, and longer, but they ordered us whispered, as softly as a pale of bells, up for Boney's Airs. Oh that was a that they found his image in wax-work, terrible consarn, so it was, and many all alive and kicking, your honour. brave fellows lost their billet, for these But the worst of it was the loss of Spaniards had an ugly knack of knock- our colours, that hung dangling in the ing the wounded upon the head after church of San Nicolas, where the brave they were kilt. Sure wasn't I one of Sir Samuel A ty bad suffered so the party that stormed the Pizzelaro much; but that was a bad job, to make del Tow-row, where the bulls fight; the most of it, and all through treachery and did'nt we make a big bull of it; and cowardice, your honour, bad manfor how could we get-at'em your honour, ners to his powther'd fiz-bog. But the seeing there was not even the spoke of colours ! ob did'nt they stick in my a ladder by way of a staircase? Ah, gizzard, sure! and so I spoke a word then poor Pat tumbled down with a or two about it to my ould comrade, wound I got in the breast; and then I Corporal Blacketer,-him as puckythought of dare little Ireland and looed the saints. What's to be done?" Norah ; and so I struggled to get up says he. "Arrah, dacently, walk off again; but all was no use, till I fainted with them,' says I. "How's that? with the loss of blood; and there I says he. So seeing he'd no liking to lay, as spacheless and as comical as pos- the matter, I was obliged to close my sible. Well, when I woke I heard a chatter-box, and soon after we sailed soft swate voice spaking to me in down the river. Well, about two years broken English, it was just like afterward an ill-wind blow'd me there Norah's, your honour,--and so I open- again, and I couldn't help going to take ed my day-lights to take a peep at the a sly peep. Oh didn't I get into a angel, for I thought it was her own big rage, sure, when they struck like a dare self come in a phantomical way blight upon my eyes. Ob Paddy, says to cheer my spirit, abont to quit this I, twig em, and take shame to yourworld of trouble, -only I could'nt self for not dislodging them from their make out the brogue; but not a soul height! And so it bother'd me night did I see, saving and except a young and day, your honour, that I could'nt officer, in the uniform of a Spanish slape a wink, nor ever cease to think "hussar, kneeling by my side, and fale- of it while waking. Well, one evening ing my pulse, which was now bateing Jerry Driscol and myself were ashore, the dead march. The crature started taking a sup of the crature : Jerry was when I shew'd my peepers, and the cap a broth of a boy, and knew that two flew from its head. Oh, I shall never and two made five when his own ugly forget to remember that same ; for it mug was shoved in to balance the acwas a woman, your honour, and a count. He was a blue jacket, your noble one too; and though French by honour, belonging to a sloop of war. birth, a countryman of my own, seeing Arrah, Jerry, says I, 'shall we do the that she'd married a son of the sod.* thing ? _Faith and we will,' says he, Long life to her, whether she's dead and the more, by token that they have or alive for her kindness to poor Pat! stuck the bunting up;' as indeed they for didn't she have me carried by the had, your honour, with R.M.B, on it, Viceroy's sarvants to snug quarters, for Royal Marine Battalion. So when where my wound was dress'd and the night came, off we set, and got safe ball distracted; faith, and she did, your into the middle of the centre of the honour, and many more beside me, for church, and clapp'd ourselves in amafter the battle, having a regard for bush out of sight, where nobody could the poor brave soudger, and knowing see us. About midnight, Now, says that niany lay bladeing on the ground, I, “Jerry's the time; you must mountshe put on the regimentals of a captain a-reeve-o, only take care the rope don't of hussars, as one of the general's aid- get round your neck.' Well, just as

we was going to begin, we heard the • A fact. Madaine O'G. a native of the Isle of France, and married to Captain O'G. brother

most terriblest noise, and what should to the Counsellor of that name.

it be but one of the padres, who had been sipping the supernaculum and what's that rope? says the sargeant, fallen asleep in the sentry-box-the pointing to it. Oh the sinner!' says confessional box I mane. Bad manners Jerry, and sure he was going to hang to him for stretching his day-lights, himself, but didn't like it. Faith but and prying into other men's affairs ! its all evident now, Mr. Sargeant, and Oh, your honour, he roared like a we've saved his life. However, your Pope's bull, but he was as big as three honour, they marched us off to the moderate-sized aldermen. Arrah be guard-house, Jerry and I, and there aisey,' says Jerry, giving him a thump we staid till morning light, our hearts in his rot-under-ty, which would have bateing the tattoo all the time, for we'd held a cathedral, Can't you behave no great relish to the mines for life. yourself, jewel ? Thump he went But joy betide the friar, he made it out again ; it sounded like a big drum, or to be a merry-kill, and so we were rea Chinese gong. Tuzzy muzzy wow, leas'd for the honour of San Nicolas, and be quiet then,' says Jerry, fetching spite of the thwacks he got in his corhim another poké in his middle aisle, poration that would have held all the that made the steeple totter. The common-council-men in London; and sentry peep'd in, Jerry twigg'd him, so the colours hang there till this time, and cotch'd the friar round the neck, unless they've taken them down. Jerry's and down they rollid together, both in Green-itch, and here's poor Pat in roaring with all their might. It struck Chilsea. God bless His Majesty and me comicalI couldn't tell what to the country for such a home !" make of it. "Arrah, Jerry,' says I,

CORNELIUS BUFFSTICK. , 'don't you mane to get up?'- Oh the Lit. Gaz. murthering rascal !' says he, don't you see how he's using me l'and indeed is IMPROMPTU, your honour, the padre was belabour. ON READING MOORE's “NETS AND CAGES," ing him with both his fists. I ran to IN THE MORNING CHRONICLE OF NOassist, but a sargeant and guard entered. VEMBER 29th 1822. • Arrah, Paddy,' says I, its all over Young Chloe caught her loves in bets, · with you now; we shall both be hung And I prefer her plan;

for felo de see. "What's the matter Tho' Susan, in a love-cage gets, · here,' says the sargeant-for he was a Her new-caught captive man.

countryman, your honour, that had de- s - sarted from Whitelock's army,as indeed,

de Sure Chloe is the wiser lass;

eg; And that for this plain reason: there were hundreds more-_ What's

The love that's bound by bars of brass, the matter here -Oh, by my conscience,' says Jerry, jumping up and

Thinks very light of treason. touching his hat, Mr. Sargeant, but But give

But give true love its fullest play, that same fellow is a thumping rogue,

And seldom it will wander: so he is. – Be aisey,' says the sargeant;

The streams that cannot flow straightand so he speaks to the padre in broken

way Spanish, and tells him to get up, and Are certain to meander. the soldiers lever'd him up with their The love which no one can retain, firelocks. And then he tells them a Unless as by a fetter, long story about his being asleep, and Its loss we ought to reckon gain: one dreaming that somebody was trying to The sooner, and the better. stale the Virgin Mary, and that San

J.N. Nicolas tweak'd his nose, and he woke and cotch'd us at it. Do you hear

CUPID STUNG. that says the Sargeant. Faith and

- FROM THE GREEK, I do,' says Jerry, but sorrow the sillyA slumb'ring bee, by Love unseen, bull do I understand at all at all; all Had in a bed of roses been ; I know of the matter is, that we were The god was stung, the wound was sore, passing by, and heard the poor jontle. Anguish made the urchin roar. man hallowing; so we ran in, and Away he flew with all his might* thinking he'd got the cramp in the To seek his mother, Venus bright: stomach, I rubb'd his eminence a little, “ Mamma, your son is kill'd," he cries, when the ungrateful rascal knock'd “Kill'd is your son, your Cupid dies : me down, and threw himself on the top A little serpent wounded me; of the outside of me, and I'm almost Wings it has, and call'd a bee. mumm'd to a jammy-arrah no, jumm'd If a bee's sting so sharp can prove," to a mammy-och botheration, it 's How sharp," says he, “are wounds jamm’d to à mummy, I mane.'- But of love!"

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