Discourse Delivered Before the American Institute of Instruction: At the Opening of Their Third Course of Lectures, August 23, 1832

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Carter, Hendee, 1832 - 21 σελίδες

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Σελίδα 4 - PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN, WHY are we here ? That the members of this Institute should meet together to communicate the results of their reflections, and impart the fruits of their observation and experience to each other, is indeed one of the main objects of your association. But why these open doors, this general invitation, this mixed assembly ? And why this discourse from one, who has not the honor to be of your number, and who is not particularly acquainted with the subject of education in theory,...
Σελίδα 19 - ... course. Allow each scholar the opportunity at fixed times of entering his name as a voluntary student in any one or more of these departments, which he may select, with the single restriction (necessary to prevent capricious changes and desultory study) that whatever course he has once undertaken shall be pursued, till he has completed it. And to insure punctual attendance and diligence, let him receive the same marks for merit and the same censures for absence and neglect as in the ordinary...
Σελίδα 18 - Their logic and philosophy were those of the day, and an idea of the extent, to which these were cultivated may be gathered from the theses published and defended at the first Commencement, in 1642, which were printed at the time in England, and are preserved by Hutchinson in his History. The same system continued till the beginning of the last century, in the course of which the whole plan of education was entirely changed and brought to the state, in which it continued for many years previous to...
Σελίδα 19 - ... punctual attendance and diligence, let him receive the same marks for merit and the same censures for absence and neglect as in the ordinary course of study. In the distribution of college honors and rewards also of all kinds, let the same regard be paid to proficiency in the studies thus voluntarily chosen, as to proficiency in the regular collegiate course. It cannot be doubted, 1 think, that the standing of the students in the voluntary classes, in which they would naturally be arranged on...
Σελίδα 12 - But here the main skill and groundwork will be to temper them such lectures and explanations upon every opportunity as may lead and draw them in willing obedience, inflamed with the study of learning and the admiration of virtue; stirred up with high hopes of living to be brave men and worthy patriots, dear to God and famous to all ages.
Σελίδα 7 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Σελίδα 10 - But if the term practically useful be confined, as it has sometimes been, to those occupations, which tend to supply our physical wants merely, then utility is not the sole, nor even the highest object of education. Undoubtedly, when the acquisition of the means of subsistence comes into direct competition with the acquisition of anything else, so that one of them only can be enjoyed, the former must be preferred, and every possible exertion must be made to secure it. But to suppose, that our exertions...
Σελίδα 20 - These are the regular students, and the lime thus allowed is sufficient for them ordinarily to obtain a satisfactory knowledge of two foreign languages, so as to read them with facility, and to write them with tolerable correctness. But those, who can find leisure from all their other college duties, may receive instruction at other times, and the number of these is often as great as that of the regular students, and lately even greater. In this way some individuals have acquired five languages,...

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