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JUDGESHIP OF THE SUDDER DEWANNY It is said, that Mr. W. Cracroft and Mr. P. Nisbett are the candidates for the vacancy in the Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut Adawluts, occasioned by the retirement of Mr. C. Harding, one of the Judges of that Court, who proceeds to England on furlough.

THE DROUGHT.-The great drought which prevails threatens the most disastrous consequences to the poor The tanks around Calcutta are now as much dried up, as they usually are in the month of May, and almost all agricultural operations being suspended, grain is daily rising in price, so that the inhabitants of the suburbs, have the uncheering prospect of experiencing great inconvenience from hunger and thrust during the

next warm season.

FAMINE. The want of rain has caused the most disastrous results throughout the whole of the upper provinces, and a most severe famine prevails. The following is an extract of a letter from Tirboot on the subject:

"In verity and truth we are threatened with the most calamitous season ever known. Here is the middle of January without a drop of rain since October; with three-fourths of our lands not yet prepared for lack of moisture, vegetation actually withering, and, in short, every prospect not only of no indigo, but really of a famine for want of means to cultivate the first necessa

ries of life for the inhabitants. The scarcity is already severely felt, and the natives are crying out that this must be such a season as that of the great famine about twenty-five years ago, when no rice could be sown, and all that was, became inundated before the end of June. I look on this season for planters as one of those that fix an era of-alas! what we meet most unfrequently-unmitigated destruction and ruin."

THE OPIUM SALE.-The second opium sale of the season took place on the 5th instant, at the Exchange, and went off very steadily, although the attendance appeared much less than that of the sale last month, and the number of bidders much fewer. The quantity put up was 1,500 Patna and 800 Benares, besides six chests Benares of last year's provision: eighty chests Patna and fifty chests Benares of the French privilege, belonging to the January sale this year.-Prices of Patna ranged from 700 to 725 Co.'s rupees, Benares from 610 to 615 Co.'s rupees.

THE BLACK ACT.- -The following is an extract of a letter from Mr. Turton, to Mr. Dickens, in reference to the Black Act.

"Things as to the Black Act remain precisely in the state they were three months ago; but I am preparing for my Parliamentary campaign, and hope. by next month ro have something to communicate. I fear it will not be favorable.

I am most anxious, as you may suppose, to hear what you and the Committee think of my attempt to get into Parliament. I am now going to endeavour to open the return at Worcestor, a very radical place, and think I should be nearly certain of being returned for it, if the present election is set aside. Crawfurd, you know, has lost his return for Preston. We, the Indians, have been exceedingly unluckly on this occasion. Crawfurd's return would have been a great thing for us; for he is well acquainted with Indian matters, has taken up the Black Act business con amore, and has helped me, without any apparent jelousy and dissatisfaction. I have written a

what I am about at Worcester; but I have been so inturrupted that I have not time to write to you as I bad I am much better in health than I was.' " * intended.

COAL SURVEY.The survey upon which Mr. Homfray was employed last year, on behalf of Government, to ascertain the practicability of bringing coals from the Coel and Soane river districts, left off with an urgent recommendation for its being continued in the present year, and in hopes from some very promising appearthe great. ances, of establishing the connexion of Palamoo and Coel river coal fields, with several sites along the banks of the Soane both to the north and south of the Coel river. These sites have been again explored, and some of them ascertained to co ntain coal. The samples which have been dug, although not of the very best description of coal, are said to be sufficiently so to encourage the continuation of the research in those parts of the country below the range of hills which skirt the south-east bank of the Soane. There are a vast number of distinct deposits of carbonacious black slate with admixtures of coal, in various proportions, on both banks of the Soane. There is also that interesting deposit of the lias, which was also noiced and identified to be the long suspected and true lias limestone-perhaps one of the most valuable acquisitions to the present internal resources of this hiThere is also a bed of therto unexplored country. thick carbonaceous black slate in the nullah near to Bidjegur, but nothing of the character of true coal has yet been discovered.

SOUTH AMERICAN COPPER.-The practical effect of double legislation is beautifully illustrated by the position of the two American ships, which have lately arrived, and which must away to sea again, under the late order or regulation of the Court of Directors with their cargo unbroken; or, at all events, if they remain, can only do so, with the most valuable part of it unsold, viz. the South American copper, unless the President in Council will sanction infrigement of the regulation, on the ground of its taking the parties affected so completely by surprise. Indeed it may be questioned whether under the commercial treaty with the United States, which was laid upon the table of both Houses of Parliament, the prohibition against American vessels bringing the produce of other countries can be legally enforced. The case is now before the Government, on the representation of the Collector of Customs for its decision.

A BARBARIN SHIELD.-It has been stated, that the commander of the ship Strathisla, which vessel lately arrived at this port from the Malay coast, brought out a shied" which had been captured from the savages in Torryls Straits. The shield is in the shape of a tortoise, and in it are set,in a state of preservation, the heads of the captain of a ship which belonged to this port, and was lost some time since, and seventeen of his crew and passengers. The heads bear all the scars of wounds which were inflicted on them. The captain's head is put in the place representing the head of the tortoise and a boy's is at the tail, and either of the crew's on each side. A facsimile of the horrid shield, as drawn from the original, is in the possession of Messrs. Sheldon and Co.

EXHIBITION OF VEGETABLES.-The show of vegetables at the Town Hall, on the 29th of January, far excelled anything that could have been expected with reference to the unusually unfavorable season. The cauliflower was beatiful and would have vied with any in Covent Garden. The cabbage was also very fine. The peas were excellent, and there were two fine baskets of English or rather Cape broad beams. Carrots from Cape.

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THE

MONUMENT. -Government have sanctioned the estimate completing the plaistering of the Ochterlony monument and repairing it. The amount is about Rs 460.

as twelve lacs of rupees. The assemblage was, as usual, comprsied of natives of Lahore, Delhi, Oude, Seringapatam, Bombay and the lower provinces, and a great many from the Nepaul and Burmese states. No remarkable accidents occurred beyond a large boat laden with tobacco having suddenly foundered; all lives on board were however saved. No affrays, or assaults have been reported, and from all accounts the melah was conducted very quietly.

FAILURE. The failure of an eminent Shroffing and Banking House, trading in the Burra Bazar, occurred on the 1st instant, under the name of Tarachund Day and Madob Churn Day. Their liabilities are reported at twenty lacs of rupees.

QUARANTINE AT MALTA.-The severity of quarantine at Malta is greatly mitigated, indeed done away with. Passengers arriving in the Alexandria steamer, provided they do not land, are shipped into the London steamer, in the port, and proceed at once on their voyage, saving thus the delay of twenty or thirty days, which is the period for performing quarantine alloted to even clean bills of health.

OCHTERLONY

LORD CARDIGAN - -Lord Cardigan forfeited his passage in the Repulse, and took up cabins in the Juliana for Madras, from which place his Lordship and the Countess proceeded dak to Bombay. This change of plan arises from a desire on the part of the Lord to be present at her Majesty's coronation, which he would have in all probability missed, had he sailed in the Repulse.

COLONEL COCK.-Colonel Cock, it appears, has been appointed to the command of the Dinapore division of the army, with the rank of brigadier, during the absence of Major General W. Richards, C.B., or until further

orders.

Government have come to the resolution of issuing new Company pice and receiving old sicca pice, iu exchange for Company rupees-sixty-four of each denomination of pice to the rupee. This will be a great relief to every class of persons who pay or receive money in fractional parts of the rupee. The words "until further orders" are of course mere words of form, for it would be doubly cruel in the poor ever again to leave them at the mercy of the polars, so long at least as the old defaced pice remain in circulation.

THE GOVERNOR'S PRIVATE SECRETARY.-The appoint ment of private secretary to the Deputy Governor, is given to James Hutchinson, Esq., for whom Ross D. Mangles, Esq., has been hitherto officiating. Mr. Hutchinson, has just returned to Calcutta from the Cape.

MR. A DOBBS.-Mr Dobbs, the Master in Equity, has returned with his health perfectly restored. This gentleman took the oaths to Her Majesty, and resumed office on the 29th intant.

PECHEEGAUM EXPEDITION.-A letter from Assam states that the commissioner and Major White arrived at Suddea on the 29th of January, and that Lieut. Miller had gone with seventy-five men to endeavour to take the Pechee Gaum, who had been fighting with the Let Gaums. It is expected that Lieut. Miller will have some trouble.

Calcutta in November, several estimates for additional AQUEDUCTS.-Just before the Chief Magistrate left aqueducts were submitted to Government through the Military Board; but the one nearly finished in Lyon's Range, New China Bazar Street and Clive Street was especially recommended for sanction, and the chief Magistrate ordered its immediate commencement pending sanction; that it was sanctioned either last Tuesday week or the Council day before it, and the sanction forwarded the other day by the Military Board to the Conservency Department: the Deputy Governor rejected the remaining projects submitted with the exception of that for an aqueduct along Boitakhana, from Wellington Street to the Circulur Road, but suspended his sanction for that work until he should receive the estimate.

DACOITY.-The treasure belonging to the Stud depôt at Buxar, has been attacked and carried off by a band of dacoits accompanied by a party of horse. The gang is understood to have amounted to about fifty or sixty men altogether; and the guard allotted for the protection of the treasure being very small, it made no resistance. The attack was quite unexpected, so much so that the sentry was disarmed, and the chookeedar who alone offered to oppose the party, was speared in the head, and disarmed. The dacoits, it appears, had been hovering aboutthe town of Buxar for the purpose of carrying off a ANNUAL MELAH AT SAUGORY.-The annual melah or large sum of money which a Mahajan expected from fair at Saugore, commenced at the end of December Patna, and of which the dacoits had received intimaand continued up to the 20th of January. A party tion; but, being disappointed in that, they attacked the of the 24-Pergunnah indefatigables, an European officer, stud treasure and carried off an iron chest containing and the full guard, attended. The boats of all sizes twenty thousand rupees in cash, and about five thousand and descriptions far exceeded the past year's assem- rupees in bank notes belonging to the stud; and about blage, and were estimated at so many as seventy thou-two thousand rupees worth of silver plate, the private sands, and the number of souls at as many as six hun-property of Captain Thomas, in charge of the depôt, dred thousand; and it stated that articles of Asiatic pro- who had lodged the same in the treasury for greater

JUDGESHIP OF THE SUDDER DEWANNY-It is said, that Mr. W. Cracroft and Mr. P. Nisbett are the candidates for the vacancy in the Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut Adawluts, occasioned by the retirement of Mr. C. Harding, one of the Judges of that Court, who proceeds to England on furlough.

THE DROUGHT.-The great drought which prevails threatens the most disastrous consequences to the poor The tanks around Calcutta are now as much dried up, as they usually are in the month of May, and almost all agricultural operations being suspended, grain is daily rising in price, so that the inhabitants of the suburbs, have the uncheering prospect of experiencing great inconvenience from hunger and thrust during the

next warm season.

FAMINE.-The want of rain has caused the most disastrous results throughout the whole of the upper provinces, and a most severe famine prevails. The following is an extract of a letter from Tirboot on the subject:

"In verity and truth we are threatened with the most calamitous season ever known. Here is the middle of January without a drop of rain since October; with three-fourths of our lands not yet prepared for lack of moisture, vegetation actually withering, and, in short, every prospect not only of no indigo, but really of a famine for want of means to cultivate the first necessa ries of life for the inhabitants. The scarcity is already severely felt, and the natives are crying out that this must be such a season as that of the great famine about twenty-five years ago, when no rice could be sown, and all that was, became inundated before the end of June. I look on this season for planters as one of those that fix an æra of-alas! what we meet most unfrequently-unmitigated destruction and ruin."

THE OPIUM SALE.-The second opium sale of the season took place on the 5th instant, at the Exchange, and went off very steadily, although the attendance appeared much less than that of the sale last month, and the number of bidders much fewer. The quantity put up was 1,500 Patna and 800 Benares, besides six chests Benares of last year's provision: eighty chests Patna and fifty chests Benares of the French privilege, belonging to the January sale this year.-Prices of Patna ranged from 700 to 725 Co.'s rupees, Benares from 610 to 615 Co.'s rupees.

THE BLACK

ACT.- -The following is an extract of a letter from Mr. Turton, to Mr. Dickens, in reference to the Black Act.

"Things as to the Black Act remain precisely in the state they were three months ago; but I am preparing for my Parliamentary campaign, and hope. by next month ro have something to communicate. I fear it will not be favorable.

I am most anxious, as you may suppose, to hear what you and the Committee think of my attempt to get into Parliament. I am now going to endeavour to open the return at Worcestor, a very radical place, and think I should be nearly certain of being returned for it, if the present election is set aside. Crawfurd, you know, has lost his return for Preston. We, the Indians, have been exceedingly unluckly on this occasion. Crawfurd's return would have been a great thing for us; for he is well acquainted with Indian matters, has taken up the Black Act business con amore, and has helped me, without any apparent jelousy and dissatisfaction. I have written a

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COAL SURVEY.-The survey upon which Mr. Homfray was employed last year, on behalf of Government, to ascertain the practicability of bringing coals from the Coel and Soane river districts, left off with an urgent recommendation for its being continued in the present year, and in hopes from some very promising appearances, of establishing the connexion of the great. Palamoo and Coel river coal fields, with several sites along the banks of the Soane both to the north and south of the Coel river. These sites have been again explored, and some of them ascertained to contain coal. The samples which have been dug, although not of the very best description of coal, are said to be suffici ently so to encourage the continuation of the research in those parts of the country below the range of hills which skirt the south-east bank of the Soane. There are a vast number of distinct deposits of carbonacious black slate with admixtures of coal, in various proportions, on both banks of the Soane. There is also that interesting deposit of the lias, which was also noiced and identified to be the long suspected and true lias limestone-perhaps one of the most valuable acquisitions to the present internal resources of this hithick carbonaceous black slate in the nullah near to There is also a bed of therto unexplored country. Bidjegur, but nothing of the character of true coal has yet been discovered.

SOUTH AMERICAN COPPER.-The practical effect of double legislation is beautifully illustrated by the posi tion of the two American ships, which have lately arrived, and which must away to sea again, under the late order or regulation of the Court of Directors with their cargo unbroken; or, at all events, if they remain, can only do so, with the most valuable part of it unsold, viz. the South American copper, unless the President in Council will sanction infrigement of the regulation, on the ground of its taking the parties affected so completely by surprise. Indeed it may be questioned whether under the commercial treaty with the United States, which was laid upon the table of both Houses of Parliament, the prohibition against American vessels bringing the produce of other countries can be legally enforced. The case is now before the Government, on the representation of the Collector of Customs for its decision,

A BARBARIN SHIELD.-It has been stated, that the commander of the ship Strathisla, which vessel lately arrived at this port from the Malay coast, brought out a shied" which had been captured from the savages in Torryls Straits. The shield is in the shape of a tortoise, and in it are set,in a state of preservation, the heads of the captain of a ship which belonged to this port, and was lost some time since, and seventeen of his crew and passengers. The heads bear all the scars of wounds which were inflicted on them. The captain's head is put in the place representing the head of the tortoise and a boy's is at the tail, and either of the crew's on each side. A facsimile of the horrid shield, as drawn from the origi nal, is in the possession of Messrs. Sheldon and Co.

EXHIBITION OF VEGETABLES.-The show of vegetables at the Town Hall, on the 29th of January, far excelled anything that could have been expected with reference The cauliflower to the unusually unfavorable season. was beatiful and would have vied with any in Covent Garden. The cabbage was also very fine. The peas were excellent, and there were two fine baskets of English or rather Cape broad beams. Carrots from Cape.

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QUARANTINE AT MALTA.-The severity of quarantine at Malta is greatly mitigated, indeed done away with. vided they do not land, are shipped into the London Passengers arriving in the Alexandria steamer, prosteamer, in the port, and proceed at once on their voyage, saving thus the delay of twenty or thirty days, which is the period for performing quarantine alloted to even clean bills of health.

THE OCHTERLONY MONUMENT.-Government have sanctioned the estimate completing the plaistering of the Ochterlony monument and repairing it. The amount is about Rs 460.

LORD CARDIGAN-Lord Cardigan forfeited his passage in the Repulse, and took up cabins in the Juliana for Madras, from which place his Lordship and the Countess proceeded dak to Bombay. This change of plan arises from a desire on the part of the Lord to be present at her Majesty's coronation, which he would have in all probability missed, had he sailed in the Repulse.

COLONEL COCK.-Colonel Cock, it appears, has been appointed to the command of the Dinapore division of the army, with the rank of brigadier, during the absence of Major General W. Richards, C.B., or until further

orders.

Government have come to the resolution of issuing new Company pice and receiving old sicca pice, in exchange for Company rupees-sixty-four of each denomination of pice to the rupee. This will be great relief to every class of persons who pay or receive money in fractional parts of the rupee. The words "until further orders" are of course mere words of form, for it would be doubly cruel in the poor ever again to leave them at the mercy of the polars, so long at least as the old defaced pice remain in circulation.

THE GOVERNOR'S PRIVATE SECRETARY.-The appointment of private secretary to the Deputy Governor, is given to James Hutchinson, Esq., for whom Ross D. Mangles, Esq., has been hitherto officiating. Mr. Hutchinson, has just returned to Calcutta from the Cape.

Calcutta in November, several estimates for additional AQUEDUCTS.-Just before the Chief Magistrate left aqueducts were submitted to Government through the Military Board; but the one nearly finished in Lyon's Range, New China Bazar Street and Clive Street was especially recommended for sanction, and the chief Magistrate ordered its immediate commencement pendaing sanction; that it was sanctioned either last Tuesday week or the Council day before it, and the sanction forwarded the other day by the Military Board to the Conservency Department: the Deputy Governor rejected the remaining projects submitted with the exception of that for an aqueduct along Boitakhana, from Wellington Street to the Circulur Road, but suspended his sanction for that work until he should receive the estimate.

MR. A DOBBS.-Mr Dobbs, the Master in Equity, has returned with his health perfectly restored. This gentleman took the oaths to Her Majesty, and resumed office on the 29th intant.

PECHEEGAUM EXPEDITION.-A letter from Assam states that the commissioner and Major White arrived at Suddea on the 29th of January, and that Lieut. Miller had gone with seventy-five men to endeavour to take the Pechee Gaum, who had been fighting with the Let Gaums. It is expected that Lieut. Miller will have some trouble.

DACOITY. The treasure belonging to the Stud depôt at Buxar, has been attacked and carried off by a band of dacoits accompanied by a party of horse. The gang is understood to have amounted to about fifty or sixty men altogether; and the guard allotted for the protection of the treasure being very small, it made no resistance. The attack was quite unexpected, so much so that the sentry was disarmed, and the chookeedar who alone offered to oppose the party, was speared in the head, and disarmed. The dacoits, it appears, had been hovering aboutthe town of Buxar for the purpose of carrying off a ANNUAL MELAH AT SAUGORF.-The annual melah or large sum of money which a Mahajan expected from fair at Saugore, commenced at the end of December Patna, and of which the dacoits had received intimaand continued up to the 20th of January. A party |tion; but, being disappointed in that, they attacked the of the 24-Pergunnah indefatigables, an European officer, stud treasure and carried off an iron chest containing and the full guard, attended. The boats of all sizes twenty thousand rupees in cash, and about five thousand and descriptions far exceeded the past year's assem-rupees in bank notes belonging to the stud; and about blage, and were estimated at so many as seventy thou-two thousand rupees worth of silver plate, the private sands, and the number of souls at as many as six hun- property of Captain Thomas, in charge of the depôt, dred thousand; and it stated that articles of Asiatic pro- who had lodged the same in the treasury for greates

AFFRAYS.-There are rumours in town of a serious disfigured; he was conveyed to the hospital in a very affray, attended with loss of life, in the neighbourhood of pitiable state. This accident was a first attributed Sheerghootty on the Benares road, in which some Euro. to the injudicious management of the gunner serving the pean soldiers are implicated. A collision has occurred vent, but the wounded appearance of his thunb, must at Kedgeree between some sailors of H.M.S. Victor and exonerate him from the censure justly attached to negthe Custom-house authorities; and the former were kept lect of duty at his very responsible station. on shore in confinement during the night. Jack was rather "glorious" and pretty considerably pugnacious. The Custom-house officers acted, it is said, with much than they have been for several years past. judgment, baving seized their refractory visitors, three in number, and bound them hard and fast in the tent, before they could obtain assistance from the rest of the boat's crew, who put off to the ship, in ignorance of the "durance-vile" of their most unfortunate, and unwary mess-mates.

SAUGOR. The crops are finer in Saugor this season,

NATIVE STATES.

ACCIDENT.-A dâk boat with seventen packets on board, while rowing up to Hooghly on the 29th of Jan., capsized opposite to Bullopore by the violence of the bore. Ten of the packets ware recovered; but no trace of the rest was discovered. It is said the native merchants have lost a good deal of money by this sad accident,

ABOLITION OF PERSIAN.-The use of the Persian language in judical and revenue proceedings, is abolished in the Bengal division of this Presidency, by order of the Deputy Governor under the recent act. The measure is to be carried into effect gradually, but the change is to be completely effected by the 1st January next.

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. One of those distressing accidents which it is but very little to say throw a gloom over the whole meeting, took place on the Race Course on the 31st of January; they really make us wish at the moment that there were no such things as races to permit of the possibility of their occurring. A horse may be spared, but the highest gratification derived from racing is far too dearly purchased at the expense of a man's life.

After the start for the second heat for the Cup, a loose horse was observed galloping about. Absentee and Lieutenant went round the Course at tremendous speed, were neck and neck past the hospital, and rating it for the turn in, when the horse, which had been gra dually making for that corner, and which some riders had vainly endeavoured to stop, rushed clean across the LAHORE. It is reported that the Maharajah received racers, and the whole three, with the (two) riders, were letters from Cabul, stating that Captain Burnes was instantaneously on the ground. The horses recovered endeavouring to persue Nawab Dost Mahomed Khan themselves, but Hardy, who was riding Lieutenant, to make peace with Runjeet Sing. The Maharajah never moved again. His appearance indicated some hearing the contents was quiet for a time, but afterwards dreadful concussion of the brain, and the medical gen-aid that he would not make peace with Dost Maliomed tleman who first saw him, pronounced him at once dead Khan unless h gave Peshawur as a Nuzuranah.

MOFUSSIL.

DELII.-Robberies are of daily occurrence in Delhi, and the soldiers are the principal sufferers, some of them having been robbed of property to a large amount.

MEERUT. An extraordinary case of prolific parturition occurred in the Regimental Bazar at Meerut recently; the wife of a native of the weaver caste, at her accouche ment gave birth to three children, a male and two females, none of whom survived until the next day.

LUCKNOW.-Advices from Lucknow, of the 26th January, state, that the late Hukeem Mehdee has been succeeded in his office of Minister of Oude, by Mowlavee Gholam Ghaya, formerly a moonshee, on a salary of twenty-five rupees. Ahmed Ally Khan, nephew of the late Hukeem, still holds the appointment of General in the Oude service; but being rather on bad terms with the present minister, intend shortly to leave Lucknow for Futtehgurh; but it is questionable whether the King will permit him to do so. The King is carrying on his economical measures, discharging the servants of the state, and clipping the salaries of those that are retained. Nawaub Rowshnoodowleh, the ex-minister and his son, Sobhan Ally Khan, are stili confined to their houses, but fell confident of being reinstated. The former made an offer to his Majesty of 25 lacs of rupees for a re-appointment to the Premiership; but Lucknow, the King thinks, has had too much of his ministerial measures already. Nawab Tuhower Jung seems to be enjoying himself. The Resident gave him the use of one of the King's palaces to reside in, with elephants, chobdars, &c. He has been to all the palaces, gardens and other places of public resort, and is said to like the city and the people of Lucknow. On the 19th of January, the Resident introduced him in form to the King, who was surrounded by his principal nobility and gentry. The King shewed him much civility and attention, and on his taking leave made valuable presents. Nawab Tuhower Jung, it is said, intends leaving the city shortly, with an intention of visiting the whole of Upper India. The King was so ill that he would not see any one, unless on urgent and pressing state business.

On the 29th instant, some serious accidents occurred at Meerut in the second Brigade of Horse Artillery, when at field exercise; a Non-Commissioned Officer was thrown completely forward from his horse which failing over him occasioned his being carried off the plain in a senseless state. One gunner had, while in the act of loading, the extremities of his right arm entite

The Maharajah being desirous of getting obout one hundred European soldiers in his service, asked M. Cantell, how he was to procure them. Mr. Cantell said that the Maharajah could not entertain them without the sanction of the British Government, agreeable to the existing treaty.

A shooka was sent to the Kamdar of Derah Ismail Khan, ordering him not to be afraid of the Zemindars, but to endeavour to bring them to submission.

A Shooka was sent to Mirs Roop Lall, ordering him to go to Indpore Makhooval with two hundrad Sowars, and there decide impartially the case of Rund Sing and Runjeet Sing Loodhaua and if they do not act upon his decision he should dispossess them of their Jagheer and report it to the Huzoor.

His Majesty received an urzee from the Ukbar

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