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THE

CALCUTTA MONTHLY JOURNAL.

ASIATIC NEWS,

1938.

ARRACAN.

Aeng, 20th Dec. 1837.-In entering on the subject of most respectable appearance and the best bazar. The my present communication, I am not ignorant that a Soggree is himself a Shan, and all the Shan itinerant very able and excellent report on our eastern frontier merchants bring their goods to the market of the new has been written by Capt. Pemberton, and was publish. village, instead of to the old as formerly. The site is, of ed on a limited scale at the expense of the Supreme Go. course, more convenient for all traffickers coming from vernment in 1835. It is, therefore, with extreme diffi- the east; it not only saves them a trifling distance, but dence, I venture my crude observations before the eye of the passage of the river. criticism.

Here we paid a visit to the Soggree, whose person and The only value, I may Aatter myself, that is likely to establishment deserves to be honoured by an elongated be felt for my “pencillings by the way,” is the novelty paragraph, much more prolix than his worship is likely they possess. It is probable ihat no description of the to receive from me : however, I shall expend a line or pass of Aeng has appeared in print since the publication iwo on him, and proceed on my jouney. of Capt. P.'s report, and it is on this supposition I send you the communication in hand.

My friend the Soggree, as I have stated, being a na

tive of the Shan country on the north-east frontier of During my progress I took daily notes of every thing Burmah, has much the appearance of a Chinese. worth recording, and, knowing general taste is never sa- Though venerable from apparent age, his person is ri. tisfied by a mere route description, the physical character. diculous; he looks more like a skeleton vivant than a istics of a country, I have endeavoured to blend the amu. man (as one in authority should be) prone to obesity. sing with the useful, thus designing the captivation of He has further the misfortune to possess but one eye, readers of every calibre.

which gives his cadaverous visage a most grotesque exThose few who have alrearly perusel or have in pos. heaven above, the earth beneath, or the waters un

pression, resembling nothing that I know of either in session Captain Pemberton's description of this celebrated ler the earth'; but if I could not help smiling at the pass, will, I have no doubt, grant me an especial in- figure the man in office displayed, I was not the less dulgence, and I beg them particularly to consider me, in reference to the captain, as a cockleshell following in the pleased by bis activity in procuring us tattoos for the wake of a seventy-four. However, if I cannot be so in journey this being our priocipal object in paying him

a visit. Whilst the old gentleman was thus usefully structive, my style of description may be more pleasing employing himself in our behalf

, I could not but regard to the general mass of newspaper readers, than it is pos with admiration the commanding presence of his lady, sible for on official report to government to render his; who strutted about to and fro with the dignified demeahe must walk steadily the plank. I may vault from nour of a Lady Mayoress, little suspecting the sly flirtaearth to heaven, digress from this point to that, “ without tion carried on betwixt his daughter, a damsel of promise, any circumstantion whatever," as Mr. Weller senior has and a gentleman who shall be nameless. At length the it. But a truce with thy nonsense to thy notes, Oh! tattoos were brought, the one for L – had the semblance Mugh.

of an ancient European saddle on its back ; that destined On the 12th of Dec. — and your correspondent for your humble servant was equipped, according to the left Aeng and proceeded on foot towards Jeddinchakain, most approved primitive, or antideluvian style, on each the first halting place en route to the Yoomadong moun. I do the office of stirrups, the base of whose angles I could

side dangled two rusty implements probably intended to taius.

cover with the breadih of three fingers, and so unsatisOur camp consisted (coolies included) of near 150 factory was the tout ensemble that I did not on the premen. The cooley of this country is generally of the sent occasion attempt to mount, rather preferring to pad Keyn tribe, and as coolies they are very useful, neither the hoof or mount the elephant which accompanied us. bullock, nor wheeled vehicle of any kind being procur. Accordingly, we again pushed forward as we had come, able. The road for about a mile runs through partially for L - was as much inclined to walk as myself, cleared jungle, among which the gurjun and jarool trees flourish as grandees of the forest. After completing this The road on this march runs over tolerably level distance, we crossed the Aeng river by a bamboo bridge. ground, but two bridges are required to replace those The river here was not fordable, and the tattoos were now in decay over two small nuliahs, whose banks are obliged to swim half the distance across; in width it ap- very precipitous. The road, generally speaking, was peared about 100 yards. On the right bank is situated good, but impracticable for wheeled carriages for want the new village of Aeng. by Captain Pemberton deno. of bridges over the aullah above noted. We crossed minated Yodoweet, but I could find no native who the Aeng river by a bridge similar to that at the new knew the place by this name, they all call it opper or village of Aeng, ‘at a place called Zademow ghaut, but REVIEW OF THE CALCUTTA MARKET.

account.

INDIGO.- The market now evinces considerable ani- , chases have been made during the week for shipments mation, and purchasers finding that the holders will to Liverpool. not give way, have been buying pretty freely at the

Suelu Lac.- Very little yet doing for the English recent sales, where prices have ranged from similar rates market, and we have no change in prices to notice. to five rupees advance on the previous currency. The The purchases reported are principally on American continued drought is much against the sowings for the coming season, and loud complaints of want of rain are

Lac Dye.—Dull of sale, and prices continue low. coming in from Tirhoot and all the upper provinces.

DRY GINGER- Remains at last week's currency. Raw Silk - Prices are giving way and there is very The transactions reported, are for France and America. little enquiry for the article, the exports to Great Britain

Hides and Hornş— Are in limited enquiry, and have however been extremely heavy since the com- operations are confined to a few parcels to America. mencement of the year.

The stock in the market is large, and prices are giving Silk Pifce Goods.- No amendment has yet been re

way. marked on the quality of corahs, and until that is the

Oil Seeds.- A few transactions in linseed continue case they promise no good in English markets. The to be made ; but prices have experienced a slight fall prices of the assortment remain as reported in our last.

since our last. Cotton.-Without enquiry, and remains without al. SAFFLOWER-Without enquiry, and remains without teration.

any change in price. SALTPETRE.-- From the limited operation consequent

GRAIN.—The scarcity of tonnage, has suspeoded on the scarcity of tonnage, and the accumulation of a operations in rice, and the prices of the day are relarge stock in the market, prices continue to give way

ported at a decline on Patna, Patchery and Moonghy

rice. The transactions reported, are principally on French and American accounts.

Opium.-So little of the new drug remains in the

hands of the Bazar speculators for sale on the spot, that Sugar -Is also in limited enquiry, but we have no prices are quite nominal. Old Benares has declined change to notice on our last quotations. A few pur. considerably, and is in fact unsaleable on any terms,

THE

CALCUTTA MONTHLY JOURNAL.

ASIATIC NEWS,

1938,

ARRACAN.

deng, 20th Dec. 1837.-In entering on the subject of most respectable appearance and the best bazar. The my present communication, I am not ignorant that a Soggree is himself a Shan, and all the Shan itinerant very able and excellent report on our eastern frontier merchants bring their goods to the market of the new has been written by Capl. Pemberton, and was publish. village, instead of to the old as formerly. The site is, of ed on a limited scale at the expense of the Supreme Go. course, more convenient for all traffickers coming from vernment in 1835. It is, therefore, with extreme ditfi- the east; it not only saves them a litling distance, but dence, I venture my crude observations before the eye of the passage of the river. criticism.

Here we paid a visit to the Soggree, whose person and The only value, I may flatter myself, that is likely to establishment deserves to be honoured by an elongated be felt for my

“pencillings by the way," is the novelty paragraph, much more prolix than his worship is likely they possess. It is probable ihat no description of the to receive from me : however, I shall expend a line or pass of Aeng has appeared in print since the publication iwo on him, and proceed on my jouney. of Capt. P.'s report, and it is on this supposition I send you the communication in hand.

My friend the Soggree, as I have stated, being a na

tive of the Shan country on the north-east frontier of During my progress I took daily notes of every thing Burmah, has much the appearance of a Chinese. worth recording, and, knowing general taste is never sa. Though venerable from apparent age, his person is ritisfied by a mere route description, the physical character. diculous; he looks more like a skeleton vivant than a istics of a country, I have endeavoured to blend the amu. man (as one in authority should be) prone to obesity. sing with the useful, thus designing the captivation of He has further the misfortune to possess but one eye, readers of every calibre.

which gives his cadaverous visage a most grotesque exThose few who have already perused or have in pos- heaven above, the earth beneath, or tbe waters un

pression, resembling nothing that I know of either in session Captain Pemberton's description of this celebrated ter the earth'; but if I could not help smiling at the pass, will, I have no doubt, grant me an especial in figure the man in office displayer, I was not the less dulgence, and I beg them particularly to consider me, in pleased by his activity in procuring us tattoos for the reference to the captain, as a cockleshell following in the wake of a seventy-four. However, if I cannot be so in journey : this being our principal object in paying him

Whilst the old gentleman was thus usefully structive, my style of description may be more pleasing employing himself in our behalf

, I could not but regard to the general mass of newspaper readers, than it is pos with admiration the commanding presence of his lady, sible for on official report to government to render his; who strutted about to and fro with the dignified demeahe must walk steadily the plank. I may vault from nour of a Lady Mayoress, little suspecting the sly firtaearth to heaven, digress from this point to that, “ withouillion carried on betwixt his daughter, a damsel of promise, any circumstantion whatever," as Mr. Weller senior has and a gentleman who shall be nameless. At length the it. But a trụce with thy nonsense to thy notes, Oh! tattoos were brought, the one for L – had the semblance Mugh.

of an ancient European saddle on its back; that destined On the 12th of Dec. L— and your correspondent for your humble servant was equipped, according to the left Aeng and proceeded on foot towards Jeddiochakain, side dangled two rusty implements probably intended to

most approved prinitive, or antideluvian style, on each the first halting place en route to the Yoomadong moun do the office of stirrups, the base of whose angles I could taius.

cover with the breadih of three fingers, and so unsatis. Our camp consisted (coolies included) of near 150 factory was the tout ensemble that I did not on the premen. The cooley of this country is generally of the sent occasion attempt to mount, rather preferring to paid Keyn tribe, and as coolies they are very useful, neither the hoof or mount the elephant which accompanied us. bullock, nor wheeled vehicle of any kind being procur. Accordingly, we again pushed forward as we had come, able. The road for about a mile runs through partially for L – was as much inclined to walk as myself. cleared jungle, among which the gurjun and jarool trees flourish as grandees of the forest. Aller completing ibis The road on this march runs over tolerably level distance, we crossed the Aeng river by a bamboo bridge. ground, but two bridges are required to replace those The river here was not fordable, and the tattoos were now in decay over two small nullahs, whose banks are obliged to swim half the distance across; in width it apo very precipitous. The road, generally speaking, was peared about 100 yards. On the right bank is situated good, but impracticable for wheeled carriages for want the new village of Aeng, by Captain Pemberton deno. of bridges over the nullah above noted. We crossed minated Yodoweet, but I could find no native who the Aeng river by a bridge similar to that at the new knew the place by this name, they all call it opper or village of Aeng, at a place called Zademow ghaut, but a small village peopled by expatriated Burmans. On in many parts forming an arch over the road, which was the line of road. I observed wild plantains and a saturated with dew dripping from the foliage above. creeper resembling, in all but the aroma, the hop. On We now seemed to have left wliat little civilization we the breasts of the hills adjacent, grew a considerable had before seen, entirely behind us, for only a single kven portion of bamboo mixed with jungle tree of various but perched here and ihere on the side of a hill, partially kinds, though no other particular change showed clearell of its bamboos and other jungle, was to be ob. itself on the general features of the country. About served the whole of this march. We passeil two steep a mile and a half in advance of Zademow, we ayain ghauts, one at an encamping ground called Peenozukao, found the river crossing our path at a place bearing the ihe other immediately on our approach 10 Surrowah, appellation of Khongwa Zukan. Here we exalted besides iwo small hill streams, whose banks were very ourselves on the elephant, there being no bridge, but mudily and precipitous. From Peenozukan we enjoyed the river was not deeper than two or ihree feet over an exiensive view of ihe hills around us, embellished this passage.

About two miles from this place we with all the beauty of light and shade derived from the Teached our halting ground, Zennet Chakain, where lustre of a rising sun. I had mounted the elephant at a shed has been erected capable of receiving and the foot of the last hill that intervened 'twixt us and our giving shelter to perlaps one hundred men.

journey's end, but found the descent so very precipitous

on arriving at its summil, that I preferred trusting my The river runs close by, and a bathe after our journey own legs for the slippery adventure of descending; the being deterinined on, we enjoyed ourselves luxuriously, will being of a reil, 'tirm, clay soil, was of considerable for the water was clear as crystal, and as cold as fve avantage, or I might have gone down considerably could conveniently bear it. On the reverse si le was a faster than would have been desirable. At the foot of bigh rockey bank, overhung by a luxuriant vegetation, the descent, we crossed the Surrowah river by a bamboo which gratefully shielded u: from the rays of the sun, bilge, though it was fordable, being no where over the The encamping ground is (including the space covered

part where the bridge was erected more than four feet by the shel,) not larger than two hundred men can con if quite so deep. This brouyht us to Sorrowah or veniently bivouac on.

Thorrowah, as it is pronounced by the natives. Here the At noon the thermometer was 90° in the sepoys' pall. Arracan locals have a post for the protection of the and 85 under the shed. Feeling the heat rather un- inland trade beriveen Arracan and the countries ultra pleasent, we made a retreat into the jungle for the pur- the Yoomadong Mountains. A number of Shan travel. pose of enjoying a little refrigeration, but were suon ling merchants were here on our arrival, and I madje driven out again by an army of musquitos, who seemet some trifting purchases of cloth, twenty-five hauts for desirous to monopolize the shade themselves to the the rupee, and of Sban pawn boxes at one rupee each ; exclusion of all intruders.

these are japanned, with fasi, or pucka colors, and are We were now beyond the influence of the tile, and as bathing place here I thought preferable in that at

perfectly pliable to the pressure of the hand. The the old village of Aeng is forty-five miles from the mouth Zeuneichakain where the rough pebbles form an unof the river, I expect the tide, excepting at spring, do:s comfortable footing; here the bottom was composed not flow many miles above. As it was here I first made more of tine sand than pebbles. Here I relieved the the observation, I may as well describe some peculiarities oli detachunent by the new, and right glad were the regarding the Kyens, who acted as our coolies. They are former to leave the junyle, some having been located a bill tribe and little better than savages; however, they here upwards of ino years. I found ten sick; these are very useful in carrying burthens up and down hills were permitted to proceed in dingies to Aeng; the river where men of the plains find a difficulty in carrying being navigable as far as the Thoriowah, by small boats themselves. Every article that can be put in a basket of this kini, at this season of the year.

Here I should is carried in one of an oblong formation, having a loop have ended my labors and have returned, but for cir. fixew to the top made of split cane, anil a strip of split cumstances which it belioveth ine not 10 mention ; at cane goes round the centre, the former, the Kyen puts least I am not aware I am at liberty to make public over his bead, fixing it round his temples,while be fastens the reason of my advancing further towards the frontier. the ends of the strip below round bis waist, this keeps Thermometer at noon 88o. the basket in a firm and proper position, and gives the man the free use of his hands while travelling. Other 14th.-Thermometer at 4 A.M. 72°, aliitude of articles such as tents, beds, &c. are either slung on a Thorrowah 147 feet: march at daylight accompanied by bamboo or carried on a kind of banaboo ladder, supported a guard of 1 havildar, 1 naick, and twelve sepoys, for by two or more men according to the weight.

our especial protection through the dangerous country

we had to pass. As soon as night began to approach, I noticed the sim. countered a hill that set us all piping, and before I

At the very commencement, we en. ple people making a shed for themselves from the bamboo reached its brow I was too glad to ascend the re-mount covered by its leaves, to arrest the heavy dew that in on the elephant, who was sorely put to it herself, for variably falls in this climate. This would be the best instead of walking she bent on each knee at every step plan for sepoys when marching in this country; to sup: upwards. There were but few trees of any size to be pose a tent can be carried for an army of any size, would seen on this portion of the road, bamboo being predomibe entirely out of the question. The coolies receive here nant every where. About half way on our descent of three annas a day, so high is labour on account of the thin this vast branch from the great line of the Yoomadong population of the province. The encamping ground here mountains, we crossed a hill rivulet well situated to is capable of being made available for a regiment, sup. refresh caille and the wayward traveller. After the posing we bivouac and bring. no ients, or at least do fatigue of the ascent on either side, crossing this small not pirch any. The jungle is not of such a nature, stream, we still kept descending for balf a mile, when but ihat if every man carried a dow or axe of the coun. try he might soon cut a convenient place to esconce

we had another sieep ascent before us ; indeed these himself in for the night; and, in marching a regiment road on every march, excepting ihat we had more of the

ascents and descents formed the principle features of the through this province, it would be desirable that every former than the latter to plod over, ascending on an man should carry a dow on his knapsack : it seems to be a sine qua non among the people of the province. noticed on this march, both on bigh ground, but no

average one foot in twenty. Two halting places were At sun-set the thermomeler was at 72o.

water, excepting at considerable distances below; on 13th.-Two hours before sunrise ther. at 62° ; marched these places grew a few trees, but bamboo jungle abat day break for Surrowab, supposed distance eight miles. orbed the sight as far as the eye could reach. At the

no

had a very extensive and magnificent view of the hills,, find the road little better than a watercourse or ravine, jucluding parts of the Youmadong principal range. intercepted occasionally by blocks of sand.stone of con.

The road on this march in many parts was excessive siderable gravity ; on the summit of this elevation is a ly narrow, not more than two or ibreé yarıls wide in large open space capible of encamping a brigade, but inany places. Much clearing is requisite, and my pro

waier ntarer than from whence we came below, or gress on the elephant was considerably retariled' by probably at the foot of the hill, in front, among the branches of trees and bamboos intercepting the passage. ravines formed by the inferior roots of the great emi. On the descent from Mengzukon, we met about 100 nences around. The road from this point is much better, Jaden bullocks, going 10 Aeng with merchandize from and no considerable descent is made. Our old friends, the Shan country, which lies on the north-east frontier the bamboos, we now remarked, became scarce, and of Burmah. The caitle were in ane condition, but superceded by fine forest trees at about three miles from the loads did not appear heavy, and it is usual for the

Wadili. And now, Mr. E litor, while we traverse about conductors of this trade to be ten or eleven, hours on a

iwo miles of tolerably level road, let us discourse of the common stage of ten miles ; they make it a custom to sporting qualities of the country, Until we had attained rest at almost every convenient spot to smoke, &c. and this point, our guns had not once reverberated among the that they may always stop whien they are inclined, they wills, or startled silent nature by a report. This march, take the necessary precaution of carrying water will however, we took the precaution of leading or heading them in large hollow bamboos, lied in hundles of three our small and trusty band, making the baggage follow in or five; these they take in such quantities as to serve for the rear, supported by a naick and four. We had just themselves and caitle for at least as many rests as they cleared the brow of the bill, when we espied a gallant require, where water, as on this road, is a scarce article. cock strutting on the verge of the road, but the gaily About half past eighi, arrived at Guaicha or Netzazukan, plumaged hero was wide awake to the villainous effect of on the ridge of a connecting link overlooked by a steep the saltpellie compound, and after a vain pursuit we adascent, on whose summit a large encamping ground is vanced gun in hanil. , Alas! there was little use in this, found, but we preferred for our small party the lower for the only birds that fell in our way afterwards, were ground, on account of the water being nearer. Descend four chikores, one of which I sent ever the precipice far ing to the right, I found the spring. Very livile water into deep jungle, where no morial foot e'er had or could was procurable, but were the rock, which is of a soft have trou, save for his own protection. A sportman on slate, scraped, and a cistern formed, enough water would this road had better leave his gun in case, for although be found for the cattle of a considerable camp.

A

there are a few luwis anil chickores, yet the thick jungle teinporary dam of mud anil bamboos alone partially ru. and the steepness of the hills on every side almost pretained a very small pool at the foot of the spring

The vents the possibility of bagging. On leaving the bam. water for our own use we caught from a split bamboo boos, we got into a more open jungle, and gradually into thrust into the fissure, from whence this valuable eleinent a magnificent forest, the altitude of many of the noble issued, or rather dribbled: by this means we increased trees we saw was immense. Most of these were on the the flow, and at the same time avoided the contamination side of the Nodong mountain, around whose colossal we must bave incurred by drinking the water from the form our circuit lay. I here noie some angiospermous muildy pool below, into which one of our niggers uncere- shrub- from whose white bulbs ! pressed a number of moniously irod, disturbing the secreted sediment at the black round seeds. I regret I have not brought any bottom; to say nothing of the agreeable tincture his with me, as the olour of the plant was very agreeable. foot must have given so small a body of aqueous fluid. Here also we made acquaintance with a variety of The descent to this spring is of necessity serpentine in

mosses encasing the trunks of trees and clothing stones formation, and a mere fooi-path through the bamboos, with their verdure. A species of palm tree was here its distance from the road may be computed at about 200 discernible. My geological notes only refer to the yards. Distance of Guatcha from Soriowalı computed at nature of the road itself, and that part of the soil which about five miles. Not even a Keyn hut visible, or one

was exposed on the side of each hill around which the resident inhabitant since leaving Thorrowalı. Thermo road has been cut; at this height about 3,000 feet, in a meter at noon 84', altitude above the sea according to depth of incision of about four feet, a stratum resembling Pemberton, 1,476 feet.

fuller's earth embraced another of the depth of two feet, Start at about three

consisting of ferruginous soil, winged with slate approx. P. M. and proceed as far as imating ilie appearance of cual; detached masses of Waddai or Waddat, immediately at the base of the this slate rock, by exposure to the air, had become of a ascent on leaving Guatcha, a fall of the hill above has lighter complexion. The road requires much clearing, taken place, carrying part of the road with it, and renthe trunks of several trees now lying across it, incon. dering the passage unsafe, or apparently so for an venience the traveller very considerably. Oo reaching elephant, our's however managed so well as to get by the highest part of Nodong, we began to breath much without falling down the precipice on the left. The tuad must be cut farther into the side of the hill to make pure air, and it was evident to our sense of respiration,

ihat we had attained a consiilerable elevation above the it secure, or on the first shower the mere foot.path now close jungle of the minor hills. Here too, we enjoyed a remaining will assuredly descend into the deep ravine more extensive view than hitherto, shut in only on northbelow. The ascent after the first part became more gra lual, the road running round the shoulder of the vast and the cone of our supporting heigth, which intercepted

ease by the still greater altitude of the Yoomadong range hill we were advancing over; the road was tolerable and the picture to the south-west. After resting here a while, passable for artillery excepting at the place above mentioneil, where a new road of about fifty or sixty, yards impracticable for artillery in its present state, but capable

we made a considerable descent over a very bad road must be made. Arrived at Wadilai about five o'clock, of being made available ar no great expense of time visited the spring which is on the right of the roadl; more abundant than at Guatcha, but a greater distance by

or labor. 100 yards.

After overcoming all obstacles without any accident Our ground was on the road, as most of the encamp. occurring, a gently rising ground brought us to the foot ing places are ; before us for our especial comfort and of Natyagain or Naregain, at a halting place called contemplation, we had the view of a steep ascent, upon Karowke, at an elevation of 3,165 feet above the level of whose steep and rugged sides it would behove us to wend the sea. Here we found water and a better ground for our way on the following morning. Face of the country, our camp than that generally used, by making a descent covered with bamboo unlimited to sight.

to our left ; here we were within 100 yards of the spring 15th.— Thermometer daylight 64° : commence our which issued from the interstices of the magnificent

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