The American Nation: Its Executive, Legislative, Political, Financial, Judicial and Industrial History

Εξώφυλλο
N.G. Hamilton publishing Company, 1894

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Περιεχόμενα

Washingtons First Campaign
30
The Braddock Expedition
39
To the Fall of Fort Duquesne
46
Washingtons Marriage and Home Life
53
Concord Lexington and the Siege of Boston
67
The First Canadian CampaignEvacuation of Boston
77
A MajorGeneralTrouble with HalleckPittsburgh LandingThe Investment
88
The Occupation of New York
91
The Battle and Evacuation of Long Island
97
The New Jersey CampaignBattles of Trenton and Princeton
116
The Battle of Brandywine and Loss of Philadelphia
126
Battle of GermantownClose of the Campaign
135
The Burgoyne Campaign
142
The Winter at Valley ForgeConways Cabal
154
Harrison and Tecumseh The Battle of TippecanoeCommissioned BrigadierGen
160
The Peace CommissionAttempt Against La FayetteThe French Alliance
168
Battle of MonmouthCourtMartial of Lee
173
Siege and Fall of CharlestonTarletons Butchery
189
Battle of Kings MountainGates Relieved by Greene
195
Mission of LaurensRevolt in the ArmyThe War in the South
212
The Closing Campaign of the War
220
From the Fall of Yorktown to the Peace
227
Washingtons Home Life and Private Interests
235
The First PresidencyInauguration and the Difficulties EncounteredSetting
242
The Second TermThe Danger From France and His Neutrality Proclamation
248
Appointed CommanderinChief of the ArmiesRetirement of Mt Vernon Life
259
Adams Academic Collegiate and Professional Education
265
Early Law PracticeThe Seeds of Rebellion
275
The Stamp Act and its EffectThe Braintree Resolutions
281
AntiStamp Arguments and MeasuresThe Boston Massacre
288
Elected GovernorAgain in CongressAccepts a Foreign Mission
375
Service in the Cabinet of President Washington
388
The Battle and Victory of Buena VistaGeneral Taylors Modest Review of that
392
Elected Vicepresident
397
Succeeds John Adams as PresidentControversy as to Federal Appointments
403
Jeffersons Second TermConspiracy of Aaron BurrNew Troubles with England
410
MarriageFamilyHome at Monticello
418
Repeal of the Missouri Compromise and Its ResultsThe KansasNebraska Ques
422
Birth and Early Life
435
Chosen Delegate in Virginia ConventionElected to Congress
443
Elected to CongressHis Work There in Behalf of the SoldierEarly Speeches
449
A Second Term in the Legislature
451
Reëlected to Congress 163
463
Standing by his Civil Service Reform PrinciplesDisappointed OfficeSeekers
470
Further Congressional ServiceMarriage
475
Madisons Second TermThe War of 1812The Sacking of Washington
486
Troubles with CanadaThe Suppression of the Ku KluxCivil Service Reform
492
Revolutionary ServiceElected to Congress
495
Elected to State LegislatureOpposition to Federal ConstitutionAppointed Min
501
Elected Governor of VirginiaSpecial Envoy to FranceIn Madisons Cabinet
508
Elected PresidentPopularity of His AdministrationStrengthening the Govern
515
Return HomeA Glorious WelcomeThe Presentation of his Name in the Chicago
522
Descent and Borlood in the WildernessEarly StrugglesElected to the Legisla
523
Monroes Second AdministrationThe Monroe DoctrineInternal Improve
524
Early LifeEntrance Upon a Public Career
533
ADMINISTRATION OF JAMES BUCHANAN
551
Again a Member of Congress
556
Last Years of Congressional ServiceStricken with Death While at His Post
570
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Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 483 - Europe has a set of primary interests which to us have none or a very remote relation. Hence she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are essentially foreign to our concerns. Hence, therefore, it must be unwise in us to implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the ordinary vicissitudes of her politics or the ordinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or enmities.
Σελίδα 246 - And he said, Woe unto you also, ye lawyers! for ye lade men with burdens grievous to be borne, and ye yourselves touch not the burdens with one of your fingers.
Σελίδα 330 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate than that these people are to be free. Nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Σελίδα 281 - That the foundation of English liberty, and of all free government, is, a right in the People to participate in their legislative council...
Σελίδα 207 - With a mixture of great surprise and astonishment, I have read with attention the sentiments you have submitted to my perusal. Be assured, sir, no occurrence in the course of the war has given me more painful sensations than your information of there being such ideas existing in the army as you have expressed, and I must view with abhorrence and reprehend with severity.
Σελίδα 306 - That if any person shall write, print, utter or publish, or shall cause or procure to be written, printed, uttered or published, or shall knowingly and willingly assist or aid in writing, printing, uttering or publishing any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States...
Σελίδα 282 - But from the necessity of the case, and a regard to the mutual interest of both countries, we cheerfully consent, to the operation of such acts of the British parliament, as are bona fide, restrained to the regulation of our external commerce, for the purpose of securing the commercial advantages of the whole empire to the mother country, and the commercial benefits of its respective members; excluding every idea of taxation internal or external, for raising a revenue, on the sublects in America,...
Σελίδα 330 - The restoration of the rights of conscience relieved the people from taxation for the support of a religion not theirs ; for the establishment was truly of the religion of the rich, the dissenting sects being entirely composed of the less wealthy people ; and these, by the bill for a general education, would be qualified to understand their rights, to maintain them, and to exercise with intelligence their parts in self-government : and all this would be effected without the violation of a single...
Σελίδα 326 - The pusillanimous idea that we had friends in England worth keeping terms with, -still haunted the minds of many. For this reason, those passages which conveyed censures on the people of England were struck out, lest they should give them offence.
Σελίδα 242 - The usual time of sitting at table, a walk, and tea, bring me within the dawn of candlelight; previous to which, if not prevented by company, I resolve, that, as soon as the glimmering taper supplies the place of the great luminary, I will retire to my...

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