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QUAKERS

QUAKERS of judgment to him that sitteth in judgment,' | they be clear of other engagements respeeting 1s. xxviii. 6. Without this, there is a danger marriage; and if at a subsequent meeting, to which of receiving numbers into outward communion, the parties also come and declare the continuance without any addition to that spiritual sheep-fold, of their intention, no objections be reported, they whereof our blessed Lord declared himself to be have the meeting's consent to solemnize their in both the door and the shepherd, John X. 7, 11; tended marriage. This is done in a public meet. that is, such as know his voice and follow him in ing for worship, towards the close whereof the the paths of obedience.

parties stand up, and solemniy take each other for " In the practice of discipline, we think it in- husband and wife. A certificate of the proceecb dispensable that the order recommended by Christ ings is then publicly read, and signed by the parhimselt be invariably observed, Matt. xviii

. 15, 17. ties, and afterwards by the relations and others as " To eflect the salutary purposes of discipline, witnesses. Of such marriage the monthly meetmeetings were appointed at an early period of ing keeps a record; as also of the births and buthe society, which, from the times of their being rials of its members. A certificate of the date, held, we e called quarterly meetings. It was of the name of the infant, and of its parents afterwards found expedient to divide the districts signed by those present at the birth, is the subject of those meetings, and to meet more frequently : of one of these last-mentioned records; and an from whence arose monthly meetings, subordinate order for the interment, countersigned by the to those kield quarterly. At length, in 1669, a grave-maker, of the other. The naming of chil yearly meeting was established, to superintend, dren is without ceremony. Burials are also con. assist, and provide rules for the whole, previously ducted in a simple manner. The body, followed to which general meetings had been occasionally by the relations and friends, is sometimes, preheld.

viously to interment, carried to a meeting; and at “A monthly meeting is usually composed of the grave a pause is generally made; on both several particular congregations, situated within which occasions it frequently falls out that one a convenient distance from each other. Its busi- or more friends present have somewhat to express ness is to provide for the subsistence of the poor, for the edification of those who attend ; but no re and for the education of their offspring; to judge ligious rite is considered as an essential part of of the sincerity and fitness of persons appearing burial. to be convinced of the religious principles of the "Several monthly meetings compose a quarterly society, and desiring to be admitted into member- mecting. At the quarterly meeting are produced ship; to excite due attention to the discharge of written answers from the monthly meetings to religious and moral duty; and to deal with disor- certain queries respecting the conduct of their derly members. Montlıly meetings also grant to members, and the meeting's care over them. The such of their members as remove into other accounts thus received are digested into one, which monthly meetings certificates of their member is sent, also in the form of answers to queries, by ship and conduct; without which they cannot representatives to the yearly meeting. Appeals gain membership in such meetings. Each month from the judgment of monthly meetings are ly meeting is required to appoint certain persons, / brought to the quarterly meetings, whose business onder the name of overseers, who are to take also it is to assist in any difficult case, or where care that the rules of our discipline be put in remissness appears in the care of the monthly practice; and when any case of complaint, or meetings over the individuals who compose thein. disorderly conduct comes to their knowledge, to There are seven yearly meetings, viz.–1. Lonsee that private admonition, agrecably to the don, to which come representatives from Ireland; Gospel rule before mentioned, be given, previously | 2. New England ; 3. New York; 4. Pennsylva to its being laid before the monthly meeting. nia and New Jersey ; 5. Maryland; 6. Virginia ;

“When a case is introduced, it is usual for a 7. The Carolinas and Georgia. small committee to be appointed to visit the of "The yearly meeting has the general superin sender, to endeavour to convince him of his error, tendence of the society in the country in which and to induce him to forsake and condemn it. If it is established; and, therefore, as the accounts they succeed, the person is by minute declared to which it receives discover the state of inferior have made satisfaction for the offence; if not, he meetings, as particular exigencies require, or as is disowned as a member of the societv. the meeting is impressed with a sense of duty, it

“In disputes between individuals, it has long gives forth its advice, making such regulations as been the decided judgment of the society, that its appear to be requisite, or excites to the observance members should not sue each other at law. It of those already made; and sometimes appoints therefore enjoins all to end their differences by committees to visit those quarterly meetings which speedy and impartial arbitration, agreeably torules appear to be in need of immediate advice. Ap laid down. Ii any refuse to adopt this mode, or, peals from the judgment of quarterly meetings having adopted it, to submit to the award, it is are here finally determined; and a brotherly corthe direction of the yearly mecting that such be respondence, by epistles, is maintained with other disowned.

yearly meetings. “ To monthly meetings also belongs the allow "In this place it is proper to add, that, as we ing of marriages; for our society hath always believe women may be rightly called to the work srupled to acknowledge the exclusive authority of the ministry, we also think that to them belongs of the priests in the solemnization of marriage a share in the support of our Christian discipline; Those who intend to marry appear together, and and that soine parts of it wherein their own sex propose their intention to ihe monthly meeting; is concerned, devolve on thein with peculiar proand if not attended by their parents and guardians, priety; accordingly they have monthly, quarterly, produce a written certiticate of their consent, and yearly meetings of their own sex, beld at the signed in the presence of witnesses. The meet saine tine, and in the same place with those of ug then appoints a committee to inquire whether the men; but separately, and without the power

mcans,

QUAKERS

QUAKERS for hire, in contradiction to Christ's positive com- of moral and religious duty, from the example of mand, 'Freely ye have received, freely give our Lord himself

, Matt. v. 39, 44, &e; ini Matt. x. 8; and hence our conscientious refusal 52, 53; Luke xxii. 51; John xvii. 11; and fra to support such ministry by tithes, or other the correspondent convictions of his Spirit is ou

hearts, we are confirmed in the belief that win "As we dare not encourage any ministry hut and fightings are m their origin and efferts we that which we believe to spring from the in- ly repugnant to the Gospel, which still breasts fluence of the Holy Spirit, so neither dare we peace and good-will to men. We also are clearly attempt to restrain this intluence to persons of of the judgment, that if the benevolence of the any condition in life, or to the male sex alone; Gospel were generally prevalent in the minds of but, as male and female are one in Christ, we men, it would effectually prevent them froerpo allow such of the female sex as we believe to be pressing, much more from enslaving, their endued with a right qualification for the ministry, thren (of whatever colour or comjena to exercise their gifts for the general edification whom, as for themselves, Christ died; and a of the church; and this liberty we esteem a pe- even influence their conduct in their treator culiar mark of the Gospel dispensation, as fore- of the brute creation, which would no kn told by the prophet Joel

, Joel ii. 28, 29; and groan, the victims of their avarice, or the noticed by the apostle Peter, Acts ii. 16, 17. false ideas of pleasure.

“ There are iwo ceremonies in use among “Some of our ideas have in former times most professors of the Christian naine,—water has hath been shown, subjected our frumos baptism, and what is termed the Lord's Supper. much suffering from government, though to tre The first of these is generally esteemed the essen- salutary purposes of government our pray tial mean: of initiation into the church of Christ; are a securing. They inculcate subunica litte and the latter of maintaining communion with laws in all cases wherein conscience is dit vir him. But as we have been convinced that no-lated. But we hold that, as Christ's ligos thing short of his redeeming power, invariably not of this world, it is not the business use revealed, can set the soul free from the thiraldom civil magistrate to interfere in matters ofrece of sin, by this power alone we believe salvation to but to maintain the external peace and pouco be effected. We hold, that as there is one Lord der of the community. We therefore think and one faith, Eph. iv. 5, so his baptism is one, secution, even in the smallest degrer, un warrant in nature and operation; that nothing short of able. We are careful in requiring our [DETS it can make us living members of his mystical not to be concerned in illicit trade, but may body; and that the baptism with water, adininis- manner to defraud the revenue. tered by his forerunner John, belonged, as the "It is well known that the society, from its latter confessed, to an inferior dispensation, John first appearance, has disused those names of the iii. 30.

months and days, which, having been given in “With respect to the other rite, we believe that honour of the heroes or false gods of the battery communion between Christ and his church is not originated in their fattery or superstition; maintained by that, nor any other external per- the custom of speaking to a single person in the formance, but only by a real participation of his plural number, as having arisen also from mative divine nature (1 Pet. ü. 4.) through faith; that of adulation. Compliments, superfuar os this is the supper alluded to in the Revelation, parel and furniture, outward shows of rean Rev. vii. 20; Behold I stand at the door and and mourning, and the observation of dar azd knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the times, we esteem to be incompatible with it door, I will come in to him, and will sup with simplicity and sincerity of a Chrisuan De: him, and he with me;' and that where the sub- public diversions, gaming, and other van a stance is attained, it is unnecessary to attend to ments of the world, we cannot but contra the shadow, which doth not confer grace, and They are a waste of that time which is given os concerning which, opinions so different, and ani- for nobler purposes; and divert the atirata di mosities so violent, have arisen.

the mind from the sober duties of life, arú tre “Now, as we thus believe that the grace of the reproofs of instruction by which we are a God, which comes by Jesus Christ, is alone suf- ed to an everlasting inheritance. ficient for salvation, we can neither admit that it To conclude: although we have en is conferred on a few only, whilst others are left the several tenets which distinguish our reine without it, nor, thus asserting its universality, can society as objects of our beliet, vet we are se we linit its operation to a partial cleansing of the ble that a true and living faith is not profunda soul from sin, even in this life. We entertain the mind of man by his own effort, but is to worthier notions both of the power and goodness gift of God in Christ Jesus, Eph. i. & nous of our heavenly Father, and believe that he doth and increased by the progressive operation of vouchsafe to assist the obcdient to experience a Spirit in our hearts, and our proportunate total surrender of the natural will to the guidance dience, John vi. 17. Therefore, althou k of his pure, unerring Spirit; through whose re- the preservation of the testimonies given tas newed assistance they are enabled to bring forth bear, and for the peace and good order of the fruits unto holiness, and to stand perfect in their ciety, we deem it necessary that those wts un present rank, Matt. v. 48; Eph. iv. 13; Col. iv. 12. admitted into membership with us should te

There are not many of our tenets more gene- viously convinced of those doctrines wear rally known than our testimony against oaths, esteem essential, yet we require no furtai and against war. With respect to the former of scription to any articles, either as a conuidsd these, we abide literally by Christ's positive in- membership, or a qualification for the stice junction, delivered in his sermon on the mount, the church." We prefer the judging of mee be Swear not at all,' Matt. v. 34. From the saine their fruits, and depending on the aid of he sacred collection

QUAKERS

QUAKERS of judgment to him that sitteth in judgment,' | they be clear of other engagements respecting Is. xxviii. 6. Without this, there is a danger marriage; and if at a subsequent meeting, to which of receiving numbers into outward communion, the parties also come and declare the continuance without any addition to that spiritual sheep-fold, of their intention, no objections be reported, they whereof our blessed Lord declared himself to be have the meeting's consent to solemnize their in both the door and the shepherd, John x. 7, 11; tended marriage. This is done in a public meetthat is, such as know his voice and follow him in ing for worship, towards the close whereof the the paths of obedience.

parties stand up, and solemnly take each other for "In the practice of discipline, we think it in- husband and wife. A certificate of the proceeb dispensable that the order recommended by Christ ings is then publicly read, and signed by the parhimseli be invariably observed, Matt. xviii

. 15, 17. ties, and afterwards by the relations and others as " To eiloct the salutary purposes of discipline, witnesses. Of such marriage the monthly meetmeetings were appointed at an early period of ing keeps a record; as also of the births and buthe society, which, from the times of their being rials of its members. A certificate of the date, held, we e called quarterly meetings. It was of the name of the infant, and of its parents, afterwards found expedient to divide the districts signed by those present at the birth, is the subject of those meetings, and to meet more frequently : of one of these last-mentioned records; and an from whence arose monthly meetings, subordinate order for the interment, countersigned by the to those held quarterly. "At length, in 166.), a grave-maker, of the other. The naming of chil yearly mecting was established, to superintend, dren is without ceremony. Burials are also con. assist, and provide rules for the whole, previously ducted in a simple manner. The body, followed to which general meetings had been occasionally by the relations and friends, is sometimes, preheld.

viously to interment, carried to a meeting; and at “A monthly meeting is usually composed of the grave a pause is generally made; on both several particular congregations, situated within which occasions it frequently falls out that one a convenient distance from each other. Its busi- or more friends present have somewhat to express ness is to provide for the subsistence of the poor, for the edification of those who attend; but no reand for the education of their offspring; to judge ligious rite is considered as an essential part of of the sincerity and fitness of persons appearing burial. to be convinced of the religious principles of the "Several monthly meetings compose a quarterly society, and desiring to be admitted into member meeting. At the quarterly meeting are produced ship; to excite due attention to the discharge of written answers from the monthly meetings to religious and moral duty; and to deal with disor- certain queries respecting the conduct of their derly members. Monthly meetings also grant to members, and the meeting's care over them. The such of their members as remove into other accounts thus received are digested into one, which monthly meetings certificates of their member is sent, also in the form of answers to queries, by ship and conduct; without which they cannot representatives to the yearly meeting. Appeals gain membership in such meetings. Each month- from the judgment of monthly meetings are ly meeting is required to appoint certain persons, brought to the quarterly meetings, whose business under the name of overseers, who are to take also it is to assist in any difficult case, or where care that the rules of our discipline be put in remissness appears in the care of the monthly practice; and when any case of complaint, or meetings over the individuals who compose them. disorderly conduct comes to their knowledge, to There are seven yearly meetings, viz.–1. Lon see that private admonition, agreeably to the don, to which come representatives from ireland; Gospel rule before mentioned, be given, previously 2. New England; 3. New York; 4. Pennsylva to its being laid before the monthly meeting. nia and New Jersey; 5. Maryland; 6. Virginia ;

"When a case is introduced, it is usual for a 7. The Carolinas and Georgia. small committee to be appointed to visit the of "The yearly meeting has the general superinfender, to endeavour to convince him of his error, tendence of the society in the country in which and to induce him to forsake and condemn it. If it is established; and, therefore, as the accounts they succeed, the person is by minute declared to which it receives discover the state of inferior have made satisfaction for the offence; if not, he meetings, as particular exigencies require, or as is disowned as a member of the society.

the meeting is impressed with a sense of duty, it "In disputes between individuals, it has long gives forth its advice, making such regulations as been the decided judgment of the society, that its appear to be requisite, or excites to the observance members should not sue each other at law. It of those already made; and sometimes appoints therefore enjoins all to end their differences by committees to visit those quarterly meetings which speedy and impartial arbitration, agreeably to rules appear to be in need of immediate advice. Ap laid down. Ii any refuse to adopt this inode, or, peals from the judgment of quarterly meetings having adopted it, to submit to the award, it is are here finally determined ; and a brotherly corthe direction of the yearly mecting that such be respondence, by epistles, is maintained with other disowned.

yearly meetings. “ To monthly meetings also belongs the allow " In this place it is proper to add, that, as we ing of marriages; for our society hath always believe women may be rightly called to the work srupled to acknowledge the exclusive authority of the ministry, we also think that to them belongs of the priests in the solemnization of marriage. a share in the support of our Christian discipline; Those who intend to marry appear together, and and that soine parts of it wherein their own sex propose their intention to the monthly meeting; is concerned, devolve on them with peculiar proand if not attended by their parents and guardians, priety; accordingly they have monthly, quarterly, produce a written certificate of their consent, and yearly meetings of their own sex, held at the signed in the presence of witnesses. The meet- same tine, and in the same place with those of ug then appoints a comınittee to inquire whether the men; but separately, and without the power

QUAKERS

QUIETISTS of making rules : and it may be remarked, that I have been mentioner, any president, as we during the persecutions which in the last century lieve that divine wisdom alone ought to prest; occasioned ihe imprisonment of so many of the nor hath any member a right to claim por-D men, the care of the poor often fell on the women, nence over the rest. The office of clerk, wilk and was by them satisfactorily administered. few exceptions, is undertaken volontarit

"In order that those who are in the situation some member; as is also the keepans of the of ministers may have the tender sympathy and records. When these are very voluminoes, and counsel of those of either sex, who by their ex- require a house for their deposit

, (as is the perience in the work of religion are qualified for in London, where the general records of the that service, the monthly meetings are advised to society in Great Britain are kept. ) a check > select such, under the denomination of elders.- hired to have the care of them; but eronta a These and ministers approved by their monthly few clerks of this kind, and persons who be mretings, have meetings peculiar to theinselves, the care of meeting-houses none receive si called meetings of ministers and elders; in which stipend or gratuity for their services in our me they have an opportunity of exciting each otter gious society." See a pamphlet entitled 4 to a discharge of their several duties, and of ex- mary of the History, Doctrine, and Diena tending advice to those who may appear to be of the Quakers ; Setells and Rutty's Han weak, without any needless exposure. Such the Quakers; Besse's Sufferings of the Q meetings are generally held in the compass of kers; Penn's Works; Barelay's Apelags for the each monthly, quarterly, and yearly meeting.- Quakers; Neale's Hist. of the Puritats; O They are conducted by rules prescribed by the ridge's Life and Posthumous Works; Beras yearly mecting, and have no authority to make Defence of the Doctrines of the Quaketa: 4** any alteration or addition to them. The mem- View of Religions ; Tuke's Principles of RA bers of them unite with their brethren in the gion as professed by the Quakers; Gerra His meetings for discipline, and are equally account- tory of Quakers; Clarkson's Portraiture of Q2> able to the latter for their conduct.

kerism. "It is to a meeting of this kind in London, QUAKERS IN THE UNITED STATEcalled the second day's morning meeting, that the George Pox, the founder of this sect, was boats revisal of manuscripts concerning our principles, before two justices in Derbyshire, one of wha previously to publication, is intrusted by the yearly reviled him and bade him tremble at the sort of neeting held in London ; and also the granting, the Lord. From this circunstance and the sp in the intervals of the yearly meeting, of certif? pellation Quakers, usually given to his filowers cales of approbation to such ministers as are con they call themselves Friends, from the Scrijaural cerned to travel in the work of the ministry in fo- salutation, “Our friends salute thee." In 166, reign parts, in addition to those granted by their they came to America, and settled principally in monthly or quarterly meetings. When a visit of Pennsylvania. They are opposed to the rear this kind doth not extend beyond Great Britain, tice of aking oaths, and to war, in all its forms a certificate from the monthly meeting of which They agree with the Baptists in Jenting the the minister is a member, is sufficient; if to Ire validity of infant baptism. 'They extend the periland, the concurrence of the quarterly meeting is vilege of preaching the gospel tó females ** *} also required. Regulations of similar tendency as to males. They have also peculiar Derns an obtain in other yearly meetings.

regard to dress, plainness and replicas in las " The yearly meeting of London, in the year guage, &c. See above. 1675, appointed a meeting to be held in that city, Within a few years past, in this country, there for the purpose of advising and assisting in cases has been a serious schism among the likes: of suffering for conscience sake, which hath con- a part professing the doctrines of Umlanas tinued with great use to the society to this day. and called Hicksites, from their leader, the hair It is composed of friends, under the name of cor- Elias Hicks; the other portion adhering to the respondents, chosen by the several quarterly meet-orthodox doctrines. It having been usede a que ings, and who reside in or near the society. The tion which of them ought to be considered as sanue meetings also appoint members of their own ceding from the doctrines of the original sex, the in the country as correspondents

, who are to join yearly meeting of the Friends in Londia, Nay their brethren in London on emergency. The 20, 1829, sent forth an epistle contaimnz a state naines of all these correspondents, previously to ment of their belief; from which it appears that their being recorded as such, are submitted to the they fully believe in the inspiration of the Scrip approbation of the yearly meeting. Those of the tures, the supreme divinity of our Lord Jesu men who are approved ministers are also mem- Christ, and in the atonement bv bis suferas bers of this meeting, which is called the meeting and death. By a table purustal in a paper al for sufferings; a name arising from its original Wheeling, Virginia, in 189, it appears that there purpose, which is not yet become entirely obso are in the United States, 150,000 meters

"The yearly meeting has intrusted the meet- 28,904 are orthodox ; the others not known.-B. ing for sufferings with the care of printing and QUIETISTS, à sect famous towards the distributing books, and with the management of close of the seventeenth century. They were its stock; and, considered as a standing commit- so called from a kind of absolute rest and inactive tee of the yearly meeting, it hath a general care which they supposed the soul to be in when of whatever may arise, during the intervals of arrived at that state of perfection winch they that meeting, affecting the society, and requiring called the unitire life; in which state they inte immediate attention, particularly of those circum- gined the soul wholly employed in contemptix stances which may occasion an application to its God, to whose influence it was entirely government.

missive, so that he could turn and drive it where "There is not in any of the meetings which land bow he would.

REASON

REASON Molinos, a Spanish priest, is the reputed au- 1 bouncils and measures prescribed by reason, justhor of Quietism; though the Illuminati

, in tice, and charity, modesty and sobriety. It is of Spain, had certainly taught something like it such importance, that we find it enjuined in the before. Molinos had numerous disciples in sacred Scripture ; and we are commanded to Ituly, Spain, France, and the Netherlands. One study and pursue it with the greatest diligence of the principal patrons and propagators of Qui- and care, I Thess. iv. 11. The great Dr. Baretism in France was Marie Bouveres de la Motte row has two admirable sermons on this subject in Guyon, a woman of fashion, and remarkable for the first volume of his Works. He justly obher piety. Her religious sentiments made a serves, -1. That quietness is just and equal.great noise in the year 1687, and were declared 2. It indicates humility, modesty, and sobriety of unsound by several learned men, especially Bos- mind.-3. It is beneficial to the world, preserving suet, who opposed them in the year 1697. Hence the general order of things. 4. It preserves conarose a controversy between the prelate last men- cord and amity.-5. It begets tranquillity and tioned and Fenelon, archbishop of Cambray, peace.—6. It is a decent and lovely thing, indiwho seemed disposed to favour tho system of cating a good disposition, and producing good Guyon, and who, in 1697, published a book con effects.--7. It adorneth any profession, bringing taining several of her tenets. Fenelon's book, credit and respect thereto.-8. It is a safe pracby means of Bossuet, was condemned in the tice, keeping us from needless encumbrances and year 1699, by Innocent XII.;

and the sentence hazards; whereas, pragmaticalness, interfering of condemnation was read hy Fenelon himself at with the business and concern of others, often Cambray, who exhorted the people to respect raises dissensions, involves in guilt, injures and obey the papal decree. Notwithstanding others, shows our vanity and pride, and exposes this seeming acquiescence, the archbishop per- to continual trouble and danger. sisted to the end of his days in the senti QUINQUAGESIMA, å Sunday so called ments, which, in obedience to the order of the because it is the fiftieth day before Easter, reckonpope, he retracted and condemned in a public ed in whole numbers. Shrove SUNDAY.

QUINTILIANS, a sect that appeared in A sect similar to this appeared at Mount Phrygia, about 189; thus called from their pro Athos, in Thessaly, near the end of the four. phetess Quintilia. In this sect the women were teenth century, called Hesychasts, meaning the admitted to perform the sacerdotal and episcopal same with Quietists. They were a branch of functions. They attributed extraordinary gifts the Mystics, or those more perfect monks, who to Eve for having first eaten of the tree of knowby long and intense contemplation cndeavoured ledge; told great things of Mary, the sister of to arrive at a tranquillity of mind free from every Moses, as having been a prophetess, &c. They degree of tumult and perturbation.

added that Philip the deacon had four daughQUIETNESS, in a moral sense, is opposed ters, who were all prophetesses, and were of their to disorderly motion, to turbulency, to contention, sect. In these assemblies it was usual to see to praginatical curiosity, to all such exorbitant the virgins entering in white robes, personating behaviour whereby the right of others is in- prophetesses. The errors of the Quintilians were fringed, their peace disturbed, their just interest at first looked upon as folly and madness; but, as or welfare any ways prejudiced. It is a calm, they appeared to gain ground, the council of steady, regular way of proceeding within the Laodicea, in 320, condemned it.

manner.

R. RANTERS, a denomination which arose in to prove reason inimical to revelation; but nothing the year 1615. They set up the light of nature can be more evident than that it is of considerable under the name of Christ in men. With regard use in knowing, distinguishing, proving, ani deto the church, Scripture ministry, &c., their fending the mysteries of revelation ; although it sentiments were the same as the seekers. See must not be considered as a perfect standard by SEEKERS.

which all the mysteries of religion must be meaRASHNESS consists in undertaking an ac- sured before they are received by faith. “In tion, or pronouncing an opinion, without a due things," says Dr. Watts," which are plainly and examination of the grounds, motives, or argu- expressly asserted in Scripture, and that in a ments, that ought first to be weigbed.

sense which contradicts not other parts of ScripRASH JUDGING. See JUDGING, RASH. ture, or natural light, our reason must submit

READING (Public) OF THE SCRIP- and believe the thing, though it cannot find the TURES. See SCRIPTURES.

modus or manner of its being : so in the doctrines REALISTS, a term made use of to denote of the Trinity and Incarnation, which are above those Trinitarians who are the most orthodox, in the reach of our reason in this present state. But opposition to the Socinian and Sabellian schemes. we cannot, nor must we, be led to take the words It was also the name of a sect of schoo! philoso- of Scripture in such a sense as expressly and eviphers, formed in oppositi... to the Nominalists. dently contradicts all sense and reason, as tranThe former believed that universals are realities, substantiation; for the two great lights of God, and have an actual existence out of the mind; reason and revelation, never contradict each while the latter contended that they exist only in other, though one be superior to the other. the mind, and are only ideas.

“Therefore reason has a great deal to do in REASON, a faculty or power of the mind, religion, viz. to find out the rule (of faith,) to comwhereby it draws just conclusions from true and pare the parts of this rule with one another, lo clear principles. Many attempts have been madnl explain the one log the other, to give the gram

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