Napoleon and Wellington: The Battle of Waterloo- and the Great Commanders who Fought it

Εξώφυλλο
Simon and Schuster, 2001 - 350 σελίδες

An award-winning historian offers an eye-opening view of the relationship between Napoleon Bonaparte and the Duke of Wellington, whose lives moved inexorably to their meeting at Waterloo, one of the most famous battles of all time.


At breakfast on the morning of the battle of Waterloo, the Emperor Napoleon declared that the Duke of Wellington was a bad general, the British were bad soldiers and that France could not fail to win an easy victory. Forever afterwards, historians have accused him of gross overconfidence and massively underestimating the caliber of the British commander opposite him. Now Andrew Roberts presents an original, highly revisionist view of the relationship between the two greatest captains of their age and of the great battle that determined European history in the nineteenth century.

Napoleon, who was born in the same year as Wellington -- 1769 -- fought Wellington by proxy years earlier in the Peninsular War, praising his ruthlessness in private while publicly deriding him as a mere "general of sepoys." In contrast, Wellington publicly lauded Napoleon, saying that his presence on a battlefield was worth forty thousand men, but privately he wrote long memoranda lambasting Napoleon's campaigning techniques.

Although Wellington saved Napoleon from execution after Waterloo, the emperor left money in his will to the man who had tried to assassinate the duke. Wellington in turn amassed a series of Napoleonic trophies of his great victory, even sleeping with two of the emperor's mistresses.

The fascinating, constantly changing relationship between these two historical giants forms the basis of Andrew Roberts's compelling study in pride, rivalry, propaganda, nostalgia and posthumous revenge. It is at once a brilliant work of military history and a triumphant biography.

Featuring a cast of fascinating supporting characters -- including the empress Josephine, the Prince Regent and Talleyrand -- Napoleon and Wellington provides the definitive account of the most decisive battle of the nineteenth century.

An award-winning historian offers an eye-opening view of the relationship between Napoleon Bonaparte and the Duke of Wellington, whose lives moved inexorably to their meeting at Waterloo, one of the most famous battles of all time.


At breakfast on the morning of the battle of Waterloo, the Emperor Napoleon declared that the Duke of Wellington was a bad general, the British were bad soldiers and that France could not fail to win an easy victory. Forever afterwards, historians have accused him of gross overconfidence and massively underestimating the caliber of the British commander opposite him. Now Andrew Roberts presents an original, highly revisionist view of the relationship between the two greatest captains of their age and of the great battle that determined European history in the nineteenth century.

Napoleon, who was born in the same year as Wellington -- 1769 -- fought Wellington by proxy years earlier in the Peninsular War, praising his ruthlessness in private while publicly deriding him as a mere "general of sepoys." In contrast, Wellington publicly lauded Napoleon, saying that his presence on a battlefield was worth forty thousand men, but privately he wrote long memoranda lambasting Napoleon's campaigning techniques.

Although Wellington saved Napoleon from execution after Waterloo, the emperor left money in his will to the man who had tried to assassinate the duke. Wellington in turn amassed a series of Napoleonic trophies of his great victory, even sleeping with two of the emperor's mistresses.

The fascinating, constantly changing relationship between these two historical giants forms the basis of Andrew Roberts's compelling study in pride, rivalry, propaganda, nostalgia and posthumous revenge. It is at once a brilliant work of military history and a triumphant biography.

Featuring a cast of fascinating supporting characters -- including the empress Josephine, the Prince Regent and Talleyrand -- Napoleon and Wellington provides the definitive account of the most decisive battle of the nineteenth century.

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LibraryThing Review

Κριτική χρηστών  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

A parallel biography, and it's quite useful. Either man merits a longer book, and has plenty of them, but this is a competent essay that tells the reader a useful amount about either. Wellington or ... Ανάγνωση ολόκληρης της κριτικής

NAPOLEON AND WELLINGTON: The Battle of Waterloo--and the Great Commanders Who Fought It

Κριτική χρηστών  - Kirkus

English historian Roberts (Eminent Churchillians, 1995, etc.) delivers a satisfying study of the opposing generals of yesteryear, whose lives intersected in all sorts of odd ways.Napoleon Bonaparte ... Ανάγνωση ολόκληρης της κριτικής

Περιεχόμενα

A Fine Time for an Enterprising Young Man
3
Apprenticeship at Arms 17991805
14
A Near Miss 18051808
29
MarchJune 1815
138
Thank God I Have Met Him 18 June 1815
163
Wellington Protects Napoleon and His
182
Shepherding the Scapegoats 18151816
199
A Shrinking Colossus 18171821
226
Remembering with Advantages 18221835
244
The War for Clios Ear 18361852
267
Conclusion
288
Bibliography
317
Index compiled by Douglas Matthews
331
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Andrew Roberts studied Modern History at Cambridge, and his previous books include The Holy Fox, Eminent Churchillians, The Aachen Memorandum (fiction) and Salisbury: Victorian Titan. He writes regularly for the Sunday Telegraph and reviews widely. He lives in London, England.

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