Critical and Historical Essays Contributed to the Edinburgh Review, Τόμος 2

Εξώφυλλο
Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1843
 

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Σελίδα 240 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?
Σελίδα 37 - Forgiveness to the injured does belong ; But they ne'er pardon who have done the wrong.
Σελίδα 262 - And they do claim, demand and insist upon all and singular the premises as their undoubted rights and liberties...
Σελίδα 475 - ... that the square of the hypothenuse is equal to the squares of the sides.
Σελίδα 189 - Lord," he said to the Duke of Devonshire, " I am sure that I can save this country, and that nobody else can.
Σελίδα 426 - Testament, if you listen to David's harp, you shall hear as many hearse-like airs as carols; and the pencil of the Holy Ghost hath labored more in describing the afflictions of Job than the felicities of Solomon.
Σελίδα 2 - ... occupies fifteen hundred inches cubic measure, and that it weighs sixty pounds avoirdupois. Such a book might, before the deluge, have been considered as light reading by Hilpa and Shalum.
Σελίδα 357 - Come, rest in this bosom, my own stricken deer, Though the herd have fled from thee, thy home is still here; Here still is the smile, that no cloud can o'ercast, And a heart and a hand all thy own to the last.
Σελίδα 209 - We find in it the diligence, the accuracy, and the judgment of Hallam, united to the vivacity and the colouring of Southey. A history of England, written throughout in this manner, would be the most fascinating book in the language. It would be more in request at the circulating libraries than the last novel.
Σελίδα 371 - My conceit of his person was never increased toward him by his place, or honours : but I have and do reverence him, for the greatness that was only proper to himself, in that he seemed to me ever, by his work, one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration, that had been in many ages. In his adversity I ever prayed, that God would give him strength ; for greatness he could not want.

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