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EXPLANATION

OF THE

IMPERIAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL CHART.

In this Chart, time is represented as flowing uniformly, an inch in three hundred years, from the year B. C. 2200, to A. D. 1825. The whole period is divided into centuries, by perpendicular, centurial lines, which are dated at top and bottom. The horizontal lines represent the duration of kingdoms, empires, republics or lives. The biographical lines are placed under the names of persons. The figures, placed at the beginning and end of these lines, express the dates of the commencement and termination of the person's lives, reckoned from the centurial lines, which are toward the Christian era. Thus, the biographical line under Abraham denotes the length of his life. The figures under it, in connexion with the centurial lines, denote, that he was born 1996 years B. C. and died, 1821 years B. C. The biographical lines of monarchs are distinguished by little perpendicular strokes; and the numbers under them, designate the commencement of their reigns. Thus it appears from the biographical line of David, that he was born B. C. 1085, began to reign, 1055, and died, 1015. And by cal. culation, we may learn that he was 30 years old, when he began to reign, reigned 40, and lived 70. The case of Diocletian is peculiar. He was born A. D. 245, began to reign, 284, abdicated, 305, and died, 313. The numbers attending the imperial lines, denote the times of the rise or fall of empires. Thus it appears, that Troy was founded, B. C. 1546, and destroyed, 1184, and by subtracting the latter from the former, we learn, that Troy stood 362 years. Dots denote uncertainty with regard to dates.

1*

EIGHTH EDITION.

The improvements of this edition have cost the editor much more labor, than all the preceding. He hopes this labor has not been spent in vain. He hopes the importance of these improvements will be found to correspond with their number and extent. This edition contains about one third more matter, than the preceding. 'A few pages have been omitted; but it is believed, that every thing of importance is retained.

It was felt and lamented, that there were considerable chasms in the original Compend. Some of the most important topics of history were scarcely touched by the author. He took it for granted, that his readers had a much better acquaintance with the subject, than they are generally found to possess. Several of these chasms, the editor has now attempted to fill. The subjects of most of the additions are printed in Italics, in the tables of contents, and the additions are enclosed in brackets in the Compend. These additions are rather compilations, abridgments or extracts, than original compositions. It is impossible now to ascertain from how many sources they have been drawn. Goldsmith and Morell, however, have furnished more materials than any other authors. The editor has also received peculiar aid from Dr. Holmes's “ American Annals," an excellent work, which should, if possible, be in the library of every American, and of every scholar that knows our language.

The engravings are not designed merely to embellish the work. They will doubtless prove more conducive to impress upon the youthful mind, some of the great lessons of history, than as many pages of the finest description.

But the additions relating to chronology, will probably be found more useful than all the rest. If the editor has any claim to originality, it is in making the improvements, with which these are presented to the public. He deeply regrets, that he has not had time and health to render them more perfect. Such as they are, however, it is confidently believed, they will greatly facilitate the important and difficult study of chronology. It may be adviseable for the teacher to question the pupil upon the Chart or Table, at almost every recitation. It is also recommended, that, as far as practicable, the chronologised name of every important date be written upon the margin of the page where the fact is recorded. Thus, Romput may be written upon page 134.

Three chapters of the Compend are transferred from the beginning to the end of the book. This is done, to render them more intelligible, interesting and useful to the young historian.

It affords the editor no small satisfaction to indulge the hope, that he may have been in some measure instrumental of promoting the circulation of a Compend of History, which he considers the most interesting, within so small a compass, that has yet appeared in an English dress.

J. E. M'ethersfield, June 20, 1825.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

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VOL. I.-CHAPTER I.

CHAPTER X.

Page.

Page.

Brief Historical View of the

MACEDON

Assyrian Empire, from its

Alexander's Empire, from his

foundation, to the reign of death till its subjugation by

Ninyas,

9

the Romans,

114

CHAPTER II.

Greece, from the death of Al-

The Assyrian or Babylonian erander to the Roman con-

Empire, from the reign of

quest,

123

Ninyas to the fall of Nine-

veh,

13

CHAPTER XI.

Kingdom of Rome,

· 134

CHAPTER III.

The Assyrian or Babylonian

CHAPTER XII.

Empire, from the destruc-

The Roman Empire, from the

tion of Nineveh, to the tak-

expulsion of Tarquin, to

ing of Babylon by Cyrus, 19

the conquest of Carthage, 143

Coriolanus,

CHAPTER IV.

146

Fabricius,

157

MEDIA AND PERSIA.

171

The Persian Empire, from its

Battle of Zama,

foundation, to the birth of

CHAPTER XIII.

Cyrus,

22 Brief historical view of the

CHAPTER V.

Roman Empire, from the

The Persian Empire, from the

fall of Carthage, to the

birth of Cyrus, to the con-

reign of Commodus, con-

quest of the Lesser Asia, 26

taining a period of three

hundred and twelve years, 174

CHAPTER VI.

The Gracchi,

175

The Persian Empire, from the

Marius and Sylla,

177

reduction of Asia Minor, by

Cyrus, till its subversion by

CHAPTER XIV.

Alexander,

32 General observations on the

CHAPTER VII.

Roman History, from the

accession of Augustus, to

Ancient Greece, from the ear-

the death of Marcus Au.

liest times, to the legislation

40

of Lycurgus,

relius,

194

CHAPTER VIII.

CHAPTER XV.

Ancient Greece from the leg:

Brief historical view of the

islation of Lycurgus, till

Roman Empire, from the

the issue of the Persian reign of Commodus, to the

invasion,

49

extinction of the Western

Empire, under Augustulus;

CHAPTER IX.

containing a period of two

Ancient Greece, from the

hundred and eighty-three

Persian invasion, till the

years,

200

death of Alexander the

Great,

61 Athens and Corinth under the

More particular account of

Romans,

208

Themistocles,

62

CHAPTER XVI.

Some particulars of the Pelo- Brief historical view of the

ponnesian War,

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71 course of Empire, from the

Socrates,

84 fall of Rome to the estab-

Fine Arts,

88 lishment of the Empire of

Most important events of the Charlemagne, containing a

life of Philip,

92 period of three hundred

Bucephalus,

98 and twenty-four years,

. 210
Who was Ninyas ? Who was Sennacherib? In what were the Persians superior to the Greeks? In what were the Romans superior to the Greeks ? &c.

METHOD OF TEACHING

THE FOLLOWING COMPEND.

1. Let the pupil read over the lesson assigned, to gain a general idea of the connexion. As he proceeds, let him carefully consult his dictionary and maps, as far as may be needful, in order to understand the words of the author, and the situation of places mentioned.

2. Let the pupil read over the lesson in connexion with the printed questions, marking the answers as he proceeds.

3. Let him commit the answers to memory. Let him be particularly careful to read and think them over deliberately and understandingly, that he may be able to repeat them with propriety.

4. Let two pupils ask each other the questions.

5. Let the pupil read over the lesson once more, to fix the connexion more perfectly in his mind, and to prepare to answer whatever questions the teacher may propose.

6. Let the pupil be required to answer not only all the printed questions, but such others as the instructer may deem important.

7. Let the pupil be required to recite his lesson with the greatest possible propriety, as it respects deliberation, pauses, emphasis, cadence, &c. By this means, he may be constantly advancing in the important art of reading. The indistinct, confused, monotonous, hurrying manner, in which scholars are often allowed to recite, can hardly fail to injure their reading.

8. The more difficult questions, especially such as are addressed to the judgment, rather than to the memory, may be addressed to the class generally, that any one may answer them, who may be able.

9. The instructer may find it very useful to intersperse or add a considerable number of observations, to explain, illustrate, confirm or enforce the most important parts of the lesson.

10. Let the exercise at the end of each week be a review. If the scholars are sufficiently forward in writing, &c., it may be very useful for them to recite their review lessons to each other; and give each other certificates in the following form-This certifies that Miss AB- has promptly and correctly repeated to me,

answers to Historical Questions, contained in the recitations of the present week. Date.

C D

- . 11. It may be useful for the instructer to ask miscellaneous questions, relating to any part of history, that the pupil has studied, such

12. Let some chronological or geographical questions be asked at every recitation.

If the special efforts, that have now been made for the improvement of this excellent Compend, should prove instrumental of extending the noble and delightful study of history, of promoting a taste for literature in general, and of leading the minds of youth to a devout acknowledgment of HIM, who rules in the kingdoms of men, it will afford the editor his richest reward for all the toil of correction. Byfield, May 1, 1820.

JOSEPH EMERSON,

as,

HISTORICAL COMPEND.

CHAPTER I.

ASSYRIA.

BRIEF HISTORICAL VIEW OF THE ASSYRIAN OR BABYLONIAN EMPIRE, FROM ITS

FOUNDATION, то THE REIGN OF NINYAS.

The history of the world, for the first eighteen centuries, is nearly buried in oblivion. From the creation, to the deluge, little more has reached us, than the genealogy of the patriarchs, together with a brief account of the vices of the antediluvians, and of the ruin which they incurred.

The first dawn of the light of civil history extends not beyond the foundation of the ancient kingdom of Babylon, or Assyrian empire; and even there, it shines with faint and dubious beam. (Nimrod laid the foundation of the city and of the

B. C. kingdom of Babylon. The beginning of his kingdom,

2217. says the sacred historian, was Babel and Erech and Accad and Calneh in the land of Shinar. Nimrod was the son of Cush, grandson of Ham, and great grandson of Noah. The era, in which the foundation of this first of empires was laid, is fixed, by the concurrence of most chronologers, in the

year of the world 1800, about a century and a half after the deluge.

There is nothing known respecting the character and government of Nimrod, excepting what we find in the writings of Moses; and the account there given is very concise. He is called a mighty hunter, and is said to have had a kingdom, the beginning of which was Babel or Babylon.

The probability is, that Ham and his sons, who

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