An Inaugural Lecture on Botany: Considered as a Science, and as a Branch of Medical Education

Εξώφυλλο
J. van Voorst, 1843 - 23 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 23 - ... and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of men: as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention; or a shop for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief...
Σελίδα 22 - ... a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a tarrasse, for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state, for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground, for strife and contention; or a shop, for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse, for the glory of the Creator...
Σελίδα 9 - ... expression in words. No point affecting that species is left untouched. The study of a group or genus of animals or vegetables is in like manner the perfection of discrimination. All the members of the group are compared in all their parts with each other, the relations which they have in common are summed up, and their differences recorded in every possible point of view. The causes of those relations and differences are anxiously inquired into, and a survey is taken of the bearings of the whole...
Σελίδα 18 - It the scientific hive as in the apiary there must be working-bees and neuters as well as queens and drones : it is necessary for the economy of the commonwealth. An easy means of acquiring and arranging information is a great help to the workmen of science, and no department has gained more thereby than botany, which, through the facilities afforded by the artificial method devised by...
Σελίδα 8 - ... sciences to the student is not merely the teaching him a certain number of facts, the recollection of which may be serviceable to him in after life, but the training his mind, by means of the peculiar forms of research which characterise those sciences, to that tone and vigour which must be of the utmost consequence in giving him power for future professional avocations of a different nature, especially such as are to form the after-occupations of the student of medicine.
Σελίδα 9 - ... be therefore educated into such. The mind must be trained to reason justly, the instruments of the mind to observe correctly. The classical and mathematical studies of our youth are not intended merely to teach classics and mathematics, but to train us to the business of life, and to right judgment in the higher pursuits of men. The bodily exercises of our youth have not for their object merely those pleasures which such exercises afford, but the strengthening of our physical powers in order...
Σελίδα 8 - ... perceiving the mutual relations of parts or facts, and of testing the possible agreement of statements with the circumstances which accompany them. Now, though all men are endowed with the elements of these qualities, all are not born correct observers or accurate discriminators. Men must be therefore educated into such. The mind must be trained to reason justly, the instruments of the mind to observe correctly. The classical and mathematical studies of our youth are not intended merely to teach...
Σελίδα 21 - Principium florum et foliorum idem est. Principium gemmarum et foliorum idem est. Gemma constat foliorum rudimentis. Perianthium sit ex connatis foliorum rudimentis.
Σελίδα 9 - This is of prime importance, and best acquired by the pursuits of the naturalist. Hence Professor Edward Forbes remarks: "The study of an animal or vegetable species is the perfection of observation as far as that species is concerned. The form, the substance, the qualities, the phenomena of existence, the influence of surrounding objects, are all observed with the greatest precision and defined so as to be capable of expression in words. No point affecting that species is left untouched. The study...
Σελίδα 8 - A student of any science, well-trained in the modes of investigation which that science teaches, is a much more valuable member of society than a youthful encyclopedia or a living book of facts.

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