The Sonnets of William Shakspere

Εξώφυλλο
C. K. Paul & Company, 1881 - 251 σελίδες
 

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Περιεχόμενα

Is it for fear to wet a widows eye X For ſhame I deny that thou bearſt love to
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When I do count the clock that tells the time
12
O that you were yourſelf I but love you are
13
Not from the ſtars do I my judgment pluck
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But wherefore do not you a mightier way
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Who will believe my verſe in time to come
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Shall I compare thee to a ſummers day
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Devouring Time blunt thou the lions paws
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A womans face with Natures own hand painted
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So is it not with me as with that Muſe
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My glaſs ſhall not perſuade me I am old
22
As an unperfect actor on the ſtage
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Mine eye hath playd the painter and hath ftellid
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Let thoſe who are in favour with their ſtars
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Lord of my love to whom in vaſſalage
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Weary with toil I haſte me to my
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How can I then return in happy plight
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When in diſgrace with fortune and mens eyes
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When to the ſeſſions of ſweet ſilent thought
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Thy boſom is endeared with all hearts
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If thou ſurvive my wellcontented day
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Full many a glorious morning have I ſeen
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Why didſt thou promiſe ſuch a beauteous day
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No more be grieved at that which thou haſt done
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Let me confeſs that we two muſt be twain
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As a decrepit father takes delight
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XXXVIH How can my Muſe want ſubject to invent XXXIX O how thy worth with manners may I ſing
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XLTake all my loves my love yea take them
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Thoſe pretty wrongs that liberty commits
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That thou haſt her it is not all my grief
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When moſt I wink then do mine eyes beſt ſee
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If the dull ſubſtance of my fleſh were thought
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The other two ſlight air and purging fire
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Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war
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Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took
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How careful was I when I took my
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Againſt that time if ever that time come
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How heavy do I journey on the
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Thus can my love excuſe the flow offence
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So am I as the rich whoſe bleſſed key
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LIIL What is your ſubſtance whereof are you made
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O how much more doth beauty beauteous ſeem
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Not marble nor the gilded monuments
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Sweet love renew thy force be it not faid
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That God forbid that made me firſt your ſlave
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If there be nothing new but that which
59
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled ſhore
60
Is it thy will thy image ſhould keep open
61
Againſt my love fhall be as I am now i
64
Tird with all theſe for reſtful death I
66
Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn
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Thoſe parts of thee that the worlds eye doth view
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That thou art blamd ſhall not be thy defect LXXI No longer mourn for me when I am dead
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O left the world ſhould talk you to recite
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That time of year thou mayft in me behold
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when that fell arreſt
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So are you to my thoughts as food to life
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Thy glaſs will ſhow thee how thy beauties wear
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So oft have I invokd thee for my Muſe LXXIX Whilft I alone did call upon thy
79
O how I faint when I of you do write
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Or I ſhall live your epitaph to make
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But do thy worſt to ſteal thyſelf away
92
So ſhall I live ſuppoſing thou art true
93
They that have power to hurt and will do none
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How ſweet and lovely doſt thou make the ſhame
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Some ſay thy fault is youth ſome wantonneſs
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xcvili From you have I been abſent in the ſpring
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The forward violet thus did I chide
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Where art thou Muſe that thou forgetſt ſo long
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O truant Muſe what ſhall be thy amends
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My love is ſtrengthend though more weak in ſeeming
102
Alack what poverty my Muſe brings forth
103
To me fair friend you never can be old
104
Let not my love be calld idolatry
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When in the chronicle of waſted time
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cvil Not mine own fears nor the prophetic ſoul
107
Whats in the brain that ink may character
108
O never ſay that I was falſe of heart
109
Alas tis true I have gone here and there
110
O for my fake do you with Fortune chide
111
Your love and pity doth the impreſſion fill
112
Since I left you mine eye is in my mind 100 ΤΟΥ
113
Thoſe lines that I before have writ do lie
115
that I have ſcanted all
117
Like as to make our appetites more keen
118
What potions have I drunk of Siren tears
119
That you were once unkind befriends me now
120
Tis better to be vile than vile eſteemd
121
No Time thou ſhalt not boaſt that I do change
123
If my dear love were but the child of ſtate
124
Weret aught to me I bore the canopy
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Othou my lovely boy who in thy power
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Cxxvir In the old age black was not counted fair
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How oft when thou my muſic muſic playſt
128
The expenſe of ſpirit in a waſte of ſhame
129
My miſtreſs eyes are nothing like the ſun
130
Thou art as tyrannous ſo as thou art
131
Thine eyes I love and they as pitying
132
Beſhrew that heart that makes my heart to groan
133
So now I have confefld that he is thine
134
Whoever hath her wiſh thou haſt thy Will
135
If thy ſoul check thee that I come ſo near
136
Thou blind fool Love what doft thou to mine eyes
137
When my love ſwears that ſhe is made of truth
138
O call not me to juſtify the wrong
139
Be wiſe as thou art cruel do not preſs
140
In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes
141
Love is my ſin and thy dear virtue hate
142
Two loves I have of comfort and deſpair
144
Thoſe lips that Loves own hand did make
145
Poor ſoul the centre of my ſinful earth
146
My love is as a fever longing ſtill
147
O me what eyes hath Love put in my head
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Canft thou O cruel ſay I love thee not
149
O from what power haft thou this powerful might
150
Love is too young to know what conſcience is
151
In loving thee thou knowſt I am forſworn
152
Cupid laid by his brand and fell aſleep
153
The little Lovegod lying once alleep
154
102
199
III
204

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Σελίδα 116 - Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove : O no ; it is an ever-fixed mark, That looks on tempests, and is never shaken ; It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Σελίδα 64 - When I have seen the hungry ocean gain Advantage on the kingdom of the shore, And the firm soil win of the watery main, Increasing store with loss and loss with store; When I have seen such interchange of state, Or state itself confounded to decay; Ruin hath taught me thus to ruminate, That Time will come and take my love away.
Σελίδα 107 - Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom.
Σελίδα 104 - To me, fair friend, you never can be old, For as you were when first your eye I eyed, Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold Have from the forests shook three summers...
Σελίδα 146 - So shalt thou feed on Death, that feeds on men, And Death once dead, there's no more dying then.
Σελίδα 15 - ... even by the self-same sky, Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease, And wear their brave state out of memory ; Then the conceit of this inconstant stay Sets you most rich in youth before my sight, Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay, To change your day of youth to sullied night ; And all in war with Time for love of you, As he takes from you, I engraft you new.
Σελίδα 87 - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate: The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting? And for that riches where is my deserving?
Σελίδα 18 - Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd...
Σελίδα 130 - Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
Σελίδα 110 - These blenches gave my heart another youth, And worse essays proved thee my best of love. Now all is done, have what shall have no end: Mine appetite I never more will grind On newer proof, to try an older friend, A god in love, to whom I am confined. Then give me welcome, next my heaven the best, Even to thy pure and most most loving breast.

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