Jude the Obscure Volume I EasyRead Large

Εξώφυλλο
ReadHowYouWant.com, 2006 - 468 σελίδες
As in most of his other novels, here too, Hardy manipulates the downfall of his characters through a deity that seems cruel. It highlights the guilt that follows sin and destroys human happiness. With strong autobiographical references, the narrative discusses various themes such as dissatisfied marriage partners, extra-marital affairs and how society ostracizes even the most dignified relations.
 

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Επιλεγμένες σελίδες

Περιεχόμενα

Part First
1
Chapter I
2
Chapter VI
69
Chapter VII
86
Chapter VIII
107
Chapter IX
121
Chapter X
136
Chapter XI
151
Chapter VI
249
Chapter VII
271
Part Third
289
Chapter I
290
Chapter II
308
Chapter III
317
Chapter IV
332
Chapter V
353

Part Second
167
Chapter I
168
Chapter II
184
Chapter III
203
Chapter IV
217
Chapter V
236
Chapter VI
366
Chapter VII
389
Chapter VIII
406
Chapter IX
427
Chapter X
449
Πνευματικά δικαιώματα

Συχνά εμφανιζόμενοι όροι και φράσεις

Σχετικά με τον συγγραφέα (2006)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840, in Higher Bockhampton, England. The eldest child of Thomas and Jemima, Hardy studied Latin, French, and architecture in school. He also became an avid reader. Upon graduation, Hardy traveled to London to work as an architect's assistant under the guidance of Arthur Bloomfield. He also began writing poetry. How I Built Myself a House, Hardy's first professional article, was published in 1865. Two years later, while still working in the architecture field, Hardy wrote the unpublished novel The Poor Man and the Lady. During the next five years, Hardy penned Desperate Remedies, Under the Greenwood Tree, and A Pair of Blue Eyes. In 1873, Hardy decided it was time to relinquish his architecture career and concentrate on writing full-time. In September 1874, his first book as a full-time author, Far from the Madding Crowd, appeared serially. After publishing more than two dozen novels, one of the last being Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hardy returned to writing poetry--his first love. Hardy's volumes of poetry include Poems of the Past and Present, The Dynasts: Part One, Two, and Three, Time's Laughingstocks, and The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall. From 1833 until his death, Hardy lived in Dorchester, England. His house, Max Gate, was designed by Hardy, who also supervised its construction. Hardy died on January 11, 1928. His ashes are buried in Poet's Corner at Westminster Abbey.

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