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L E T T E R I.' Ir. Winchester, following Dr. Chaundy, holds that all men

are saved by Grace, and, in contradiction to this, that the damned suffer all they deserve.

123 L L T T E R II. Briefly sating the contradictory arguments, used by Dr. Chauncy, and the other writers in this scheme. 141

PA ÅT u. The natural & proper meaning of everlasting, eternal, forever, for

ever & ever, & the original words from which there are translated, shown to be endleis duration. Also, objections confidered.

1 Ε Τ Τ Ε R Ι. Śhewing the common use of these words, and their neceffary use and import in Scripture.

161 Η Ε Τ Τ Ε R ΙΙ. The Greek and Hebrew words, from which eternity, and its de

rivatives are translated, examined; the inflances of their use in fcripture, enumerated; and reinarks upon some of thein. Jances that are the most important and decided. 179

LE T T E R 111. Objections to the foregoing, confidered.

PART IV. The fufficiency of the Atonement, for the salvation of all, con

fiftent with the final deftruction of a part of mankind. Also The Second Death explained.

L E T T E R I. The atonement makes provision for all men to be reconcilvá to God, and reconciliation to him explained.

234 I ET T E R 11. Full atonement for all, consistent with the final perdition of part of mankind, illustrated and proved from fails. . 267

L E T T E R III. Whether fin deferuis endless punishment; which is further

to illustrate the confstency of this punihment with full atonement.

303 L E T T E R IV. Containing an explanation of the Second Death. 335

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PARTL. Dr. Huntington's and Mr. Relly's Scheme, which denies all future punishment, shown to be made up of contradictions.

LETTER 1. What led Dr. Huntington into his Scheme, also his founda.

tion of faith, compared to what he says on the doctrine of election and other things in his Book.

MY DEAR FRIEND,
HE plan proposed was thought to be good. Inability to

execute it, you recollect, was the objection. Which nothing could have removed but your candour, facredly pledged.

Doctor Huntington professes to have written his treatise, for the great end of improving calvinism, and uniting all religious parties. He tells us, " The arminian scheme is full of incon

fiftencies.' The calviniftic scheme, in the limitarian sense,** he adds, 'is every whit as fall of contradition and absurdity. • The same may be said of all the rest that ever have been ad.

vanced in the world, except this alone. But this has not the • shadow of inconsistency with itself.'+ His scheme, therefore, being so consistent with itself, while all others are full of absurdity, is the only one which will bear examination. And his doctrines, we might expect, are those only which will exhibit a train of consistency, when compared together.

In the early part of his lite, Dr. H. felt himself much embarraffed with the doctrine of particular election and reprobation, as understood in the calvinistic or limitarian sense. How to reconcile this with free grace, was to him a great question,

While That which supposes fome part of mankind will be finally loft. And, those who hold with Calvin, as to the final ftate of the righteous and the wicked in the next vosld, our author calls limitarians. + Page 182

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While he was attempting to extricate himself from this supposed difliculty, he was gradually led into his plan of universal falvation. As he here informs us. •What has lain on his mind

with increasing pressure is this. When he had exhibited to his audience the infinite fulness and all-fufficiency of Christ • to save finners, both by price and by power; and the great

duty of every sinner to believe it to the salvation of his soul, ' then to tell them ; ' Many finners, many alas ! are left out of " the covenant of redemption ; many for whom Christ never “ died. A part only are comprehended, a very few in compar

ison,'— God will certainly make such as are elected, to " believe, by his own almighty power and grace; and he will

most certainly leave all the rest to eternal damnation, as their “ fins justly deserve : for they never were comprehended in the " decree of God, or the covenant of redemption and salvation.' * I have been more and more prelled and perplexed in my own 'mind with regard to the consistency of this manner of preach, sing with itself, or with the word of God.'t In this line of Itating, or rather misstating of things, he ought to have been ' more and more perplexed in his own mind.' For he intimates a deficiency in the atonement, as the cause why so many suffer eternal milery : estimating the righteousness of Christ in proportion to the number saved. And that sinners, contrary to their own choice, are excluded, by the divine decrees, from believing in Jesus. Whereas they ought to be reminded of the Saviour's words to the Jews. Jerusalem, Jerusalem !-: how often would I have gathered thy children together,--and ye would not.'

The Doctor gnes on to say, 'My audience have generally almoll to a man let down satisfied. Yet, at evening, much per'plexity hath invaded my own mind; thoughts have thus re'Turned upon me. I have this day told my audience, making

no difference, and without the exception of a single person, *that if we do not believe that God hath given to us eternal

lite in his Son, we make him a liar; and quoted the evangelist * John in support of it.'— I have told them they must so be

lieve ; they have right to, they ought to do it ; and then every , • one of them shall be saved. When upon the limitarian plan, 'I know not that one tenth part of them, or even one of them

was ever included in the covenant of redemption, or given to : Chrift, or that he ever died for one foul of them. Ought I not to have known for whom among them Chrift did indeed die,

before Meaning his own mind; he sometimes speaks of himself in the ihird person,

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* before I gave out this doctrine; and then to have addressed the • fame to them only? or ought I not, at leait, to have spoken • hypothetically and said; if you are of the number of the ele&t, ' you have full warrant and ground to believe to salvation. • Otherwise there is no foundation laid for your faith ; but, on • the contrary, you will make God a liar in so believing, as you • will believe what he knows is not true, viz. that every soul ' that hears the gospel has a foundation for his saving faith, laid • in Christ.'* We again see how Dr. H. has mistaken the nature and extent of the atonement, as well as the calvinistic principles relative to it. This will hereafter be considered.

As the above leads us to expect, Dr. H. fupposes the gospel cannot be preached with propriety, if only a part of the human race is saved. The more I have thought on these things,' he says, the more I am convinced of the utter inconsistency of the · general preaching of protestant divines, on any other ground • than this--All mankind are alike included in the most glori•ous and merciful covenant of redemption.'t It is a fixed principle with the Doctor, that if part of mankind be chosen to eternal life, and the remainder marked out for eternal death, it is then nothing but contradiction and absurdity to make offers of free grace to every creature. A consistent scheme of free grace, as he pretends, and the offer of free grace to all men, must presuppose the salvation of all men.

But the Doctor holds to predestination, election and reprobation, in his sense of them, as strongly as can be expressed by words. He considers the fore-knowledge of God to be founded in his own infinitely wise choice, and unalterable determin

nation or decree:- including every thought, volition or in• clination of all moral agents, that should ever come into being.'1 • And every thing moral and natural,' says he,' every being and * mode of being, every circumstance, and connection and con* fequence throughout the whole system of being, did originally, • absolutely depend on the choice, election, decree, or predesti* nation of the eternal, immutable Jehovah. And all things, in .actual being, have now the same entire, absolute dependance, • and ever will have to all eternity. I can conceive of no God • at all but in the above view. If I recede in the least, from this idea, I fall into complete atheism.'

Under the head of particular election and reprobation, he remarks upon the great distinction God makes between one man and another, and between bodies of inen. As in these words :

• Elc&tion, * P. 3; 10.

P. 73

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While he was attempting to extricate himself from this supposed difficulty, he was gradually led into his plan of universal falvation. As he here informs us. • What has lain on his mind* ' with increasing pressure is this. When he had exhibited to · his audience the infinite fulness and all-sufficiency of Christ • to save finners, both by price and by power; and the great

duty of every finner to believe it to the salvation of his soul, * then to tell them; Many finners, many alas ! are left out of " the covenant of redemption ; many for whom Christ never * died. A part only are comprehended, a very few in compar"ison,'- God will certainly make such as are elected, to "believe, by his own almighty power and grace; and he will “most certainly leave all the rest to eternal damnation, as their “sins justly deserve: for they never were comprehended in the “ decree of God, or the covenant of redemption and salvation.' 'I have been more and more pressed and perplexed in my own 'mind with regard to the consistency of this manner of preach.

ing with itself, or with the word of God.'t in this line of Itating, or rather misstating of things, he ought to have been ' more and more perplexed in his own mind. For he intimates a deficiency in the alonement, as the cause why so many suffer eternal milery : estimating the righteousnefs of Chrif'in proportion to the number saved. And that sinners, contrary to their own choice, are excluded, by the divine decrees, from believing in Jesus. Whereas they ought to be reminded of the Saviour's words to the Jews." Jerusalem, Jerusalem ! • how often would I have gathered thy children together,---and ' ye would not.'

The Doctor goes on to say, 'My audience have generally al'mofl to a man let down satisfied. Yet, at evening, much per

plexity hath invaded my own mind; thoughts have thus returnce upon me.

I have this day told my audience, making * no difference, and without the exception of a single person,

that if we do not believe that God hath given to us eternal ' lite in his Son, we make him a liar; and quoted the evangelist • John in support of it.'— I have told them they must so be• lieve ; they have right to, they ought to do it; and then every * one of them shall be saved. When upon the limitarian plan, 'I know not that one tenth part of them, or even one of them ' was ever included in the covenant of redemption, or given to • Chrift, or that he ever died for one foul of them. Ought I not to have known for whom among them Christ did indeel die,

• before ** Meaning his own mind; he sometimes speaks of himself in the third person.

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