In the Balance of Power: Independent Black Politics and Third-Party Movements in the United States

Εξώφυλλο
Ohio University Press, 13 Αυγ 2008 - 216 σελίδες

Historically, most black voters in the United States have aligned themselves with one of the two major parties: the Republican Party from the time of the Civil War to the New Deal and, since the New Deal—and especially since the height of the modern civil rights movement—the Democratic Party. However, as In the Balance of Power convincingly demonstrates, African Americans have long been part of independent political movements and have used third parties to advance some of the most important changes in the United States, notably the abolition of slavery, the extension of voting rights, and the enforcement of civil rights.

Since the early nineteenth century, there has been an undercurrent of political independence among African Americans. They helped develop the Liberty Party in the 1840s and have continued to work with third parties to challenge the policies of the two major parties. But despite the legal gains of the modern civil rights movement, elements of Jim Crow remain deeply embedded in our electoral process.

In the Balance of Power presents a history and analysis of African American third-party movements that can help us better understand the growing diversity among black voters today.

 

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Περιεχόμενα

Declarations of Independence
9
Abolition the Liberty Party and Free Soil
27
Republicans Reconstructions and Fusion
54
Black Populism and the Negro Party
74
Black Communists Socialists and Nationalists
101
Civil Rights Black Power and Independent Politics
134
The Black and Independent Alliance in 2008
162
Acknowledgments
169
Recent Articles
171
Notes
173
Bibliography
219
Index
237
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Σχετικά με τον συγγραφέα (2008)

Omar H. Ali is dean of Lloyd International Honors College and professor of global and comparative African diaspora history at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. A graduate of the London School of Economics, he received his Ph.D. in history from Columbia University and was named the Carnegie Foundation North Carolina professor of the year.

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