An Address, Delivered at the Opening of the Boston Mechanics' Institution, February 7, 1927

Εξώφυλλο
Hilliard, Gray, Little, and Wilkins, 1827 - 24 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 12 - Society has little to interest him, for he has no sympathy for the pleasures or pursuits, the cares or troubles of others, to whom he cannot feel nor perceive his bonds of relationship. All of life is but a poor boon for such a man ; and happy for himself and for mankind, if the few ties that hold him to this negative existence be not broken. Happy for him if that best and surest friend of man, that messenger of good news from Heaven to the poorest wretch on earth, Religion, bringing the fear of...
Σελίδα 23 - OF OFFICERS. 1. The President, or, in his absence, one of the Vice Presidents, or, in their absence, a President pro tempore, shall preside at the meetings of the Institute.
Σελίδα 12 - But let the light of science fall upon that man; open to him the fountain of knowledge; a few principles of philosophy enter his mind, and awaken the dormant power of thought: he begins to look upon his art with an altered eye. It ceases to be a dark, mechanical process, which he cannot understand. He regards it as an object of inquiry, and begins to penetrate the reasons, and acquire a new mastery over his own instruments. He finds other and better modes of doing what he had done before, blindly...
Σελίδα 11 - ... knowledge. He has now the capacity of thought, but it is a barren faculty, never nourished by the food of the mind, and never rising above the poor objects of sense. Labour and rest, the hope of mere animal enjoyment, or the fear of want, the care of providing covering and food, make up the whole sum of his existence. Such a man may be industrious, but he cannot love labour, for it is not relieved by the excitement of improving or changing the processes of his art, nor cheered by the hope of...
Σελίδα 19 - Twelve of these are mechanics, and the remainder furnace-men and common laborers of different descriptions, forming altogether a community not very promising as a body to be incited to adopt measures for their own intellectual improvement. ' A little more than three years ago, our manager at the works, Mr. James B. Nelson, proposed to these men to contribute each a small sum monthly, to be laid out in books to form a library for their common use; and he informed them that if they agreed to do this,...
Σελίδα 13 - Society opens like a new world to him ; he looks upon his fellow creatures with interest and sympathy, and feels that he has a place in their affections and respect. Temptations assail him in vain. He is armed by high and pure thoughts. He takes a wider view of his relations with the beings about and above him. He welcomes every generous virtue that adorns and dignifies the human character. He delights in the exercise of reason. He glories in the consciousness and the hope of immortality.
Σελίδα 20 - Nelson got fourteen of them to agree to the plan; and a commencement was thus made. For the first two years, until it could be ascertained that the members would have a proper care of the books, it was agreed that they should not take them out of the reading-room, but that they should meet there every evening to peruse them. After this period, however, the members were allowed to take the books home; and last year they met only twice a week at the reading-room to change them, and converse on what...
Σελίδα 11 - EMERSON. LET us imagine for a moment the condition of an individual, who has not advanced beyond the merest elements of knowledge, who understands nothing of the principles even of his own .art, and inquire what change will be wrought in his feelings, his hopes, and happiness, in all that makes up the character, by the gradual inpouriug of knowledge.
Σελίδα 20 - The individuals of the committee have come .under an agreement (to give, in rotation, a lecture, either, in chemistry or mechanics, every Thursday evening; taking Murray for their text-book in the one, and Ferguson in the other. They intimate, a fortnight before, to the person whose turn it is, that he is to lecture from such a page to such a page of one of these authors. He has, in consequence...
Σελίδα 21 - Monday evenings the society has a voluntary lecture from any one of its members who chooses to give notice of his intention, on either of the branches of science already mentioned, or upon any other useful subject he may propose. And there is with the general body the same simple unhesitating frankness, and disposition to come forward in their turn, that exist among the members of the committee with regard to the lectures prescribed to them. It may be interesting as well as useful to mention some...

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