The Works of Alexander Pope, Τόμος 5

Εξώφυλλο
J. Murray, 1889 - 10 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 359 - True wit is nature to advantage dressed, — What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed; Something whose truth convinced at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.
Σελίδα 52 - ... for wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully, one from another, ideas, wherein can be found the least difference ; thereby to avoid being misled by similitude, and by affinity to take one thing for another.
Σελίδα 49 - First follow Nature, and your judgment frame By her just standard, which is still the same: Unerring Nature, still divinely bright, One clear, unchanged, and universal light, Life, force, and beauty, must to all impart, At once the source, and end, and test of Art. Art from that fund each just supply provides; Works without show, and without pomp presides: In some fair body thus th...
Σελίδα 382 - Britain's isle, no matter where, An ancient pile of building stands ; The Huntingdons and Hattons there Employ'd the power of fairy hands To raise the ceiling's fretted height, Each pannel in achievements clothing, Rich windows that exclude the light, And passages, that lead to nothing.
Σελίδα 361 - Parts it may ravage, but preserves the whole. On life's vast ocean diversely we sail, Reason the card, but Passion is the gale; Nor God alone in the still calm we find, .He mounts the storm, and walks upon the wind.
Σελίδα 52 - And hence perhaps may be given some reason of that common observation, that men who have a great deal of wit, and prompt memories, have not always the clearest judgment or deepest reason...
Σελίδα 36 - Hark ! a glad voice the lonely desert cheers ; Prepare the way ! a God, a God appears : A God, a God ! the vocal hills reply, The rocks proclaim the approaching Deity.
Σελίδα 10 - Plac'd at the door of Learning, youth to guide, We never suffer it to stand too wide. To ask, to guess, to know, as they commence,' As Fancy opens the quick springs of Sense, We ply the Memory, we load the brain, Bind rebel Wit, and double chain on chain, Confine the thought, to exercise the breath; And keep them in the pale of Words till death...
Σελίδα 50 - MAN, as the minister and interpreter of nature, does and understands as much, as his observations on the order of nature, either with regard to things or the mind, permit him, and neither knows nor is capable of more.
Σελίδα 370 - The principal object, then, proposed in these Poems was to choose incidents and situations from common life, and to relate or describe them, throughout, as far as was possible in a selection of language really used by men...

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