Practical Illustrations of the Principles of School Architecture

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Norton, 1854 - 162 σελίδες

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Σελίδα 91 - ... and it is further ordered, that where any town shall increase to the number of one hundred families or householders they shall set up a grammar school, the master thereof being able to instruct youth so far as they may be fitted for the university...
Σελίδα 12 - ... all these things and, more, require in the teacher a rare union of qualities, seldom found in one in a hundred of the male sex, and to be looked for with the greatest chance of success among females, " in whose own hearts, love, hope, and patience have first kept school...
Σελίδα 4 - School Architecture," or Contributions to the Improvement of School-houses in the United States, by Henry Barnard, Commissioner of Public Schools in Rhode Island, p.
Σελίδα 91 - It was then generally agreed upon, that our brother Philemon Purmont shall be instructed to become schoolmaster for the teaching and nurturing of children with us.
Σελίδα 36 - They ought to be so constructed as to admit of being readily removed when necessary, but not so as to be easily pushed out of place by accident, or to be shaken by the movements of the children when seated at them. The reasons of the following rules will be readily inferred from these preliminary explanations. 1. In planning a school-room, if it be not more than 18 feet in width, about 8 or 9...
Σελίδα 57 - ... of the whole number. When the class is large, there is a spirit, a glow, a struggle which can never be infused or called forth in a small class. Whatever time is spent upon a few, which could have been as profitably spent on a larger number, is a loss of power and time to the extent of the number who were not thus benefited. The recitations of a large class must be more varied, both as to order and methods, so as to reach those whose attention would wander if not under the pressure of constant...
Σελίδα 53 - There cannot be a regular course of discipline and instruction, adapted to the age and proficiency of pupils — a series of processes, each adapted to certain periods in the development of the mind and character, the first intended to be followed by a second, and the second by a third, — the latter always...
Σελίδα 56 - ... of nature, the family and society. Among these conditions of success in the operation of a system of public schools, is such a classification of the scholars as shall bring a larger number of similar age and attainments, at all times, and in every stage of their advancement, under teachers of the right qualifications, and shall enable these teachers to act upon numbers at once, for years in succession, and carry them all forward effectually together, in a regular course of instruction. The great...
Σελίδα 54 - ... solved, excuses for tardiness or absence received, questions answered, whisperings allowed or suppressed, and more or less of extempore discipline administered. Were it not a most ruinous waste of precious time, — did it not involve...
Σελίδα 54 - Compelled to hurry from one study to another, the most diverse, — from one class to another, requiring a kno%vledge of methods altogether distinct, — from one recitation to another, equally brief and unsatisfactory, one requiring a liveliness of manner, which he does not feel and cannot assume, and the other closeness of attention and abstraction of thought, which he cannot give amid the multiplicity and variety of cares, — from one case of discipline to another, pressing on him at...

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