The Independent Man: Citizenship and Gender Politics in Georgian England

Εξώφυλλο
Manchester University Press, 2005 - 222 σελίδες
Independence' was an important ideal for men in Georgian England. In this period however, the word meant much more than simply the virtues of self-sufficiency and impartiality. Most people believed that obligations absolutely compromised freedom and conscience, whereas 'independence' was associated with manly virtue and physical vigour. Fundamentally, the political world was thought to consist of 'independent men', exercising their consciences and standing up for the general good. As such, Georgians thought about political action and masculine virtue very differently to the ways in which we do today.

In this important new study, Matthew McCormack establishes the links between the histories of masculinity and politics, highlighting the centrality of 'manly' ideals in the political world and - conversely - the role of politics in the operation of gender ideology. The book will be welcomed by students and specialists alike with interests in politics, gender studies or British history in the period
 

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Περιεχόμενα

Gender obligation and political virtue
12
Act the part of Honest Independent Men
31
From the Civil War to the Seven Years War
57
Declarations of Independence 176076
74
Rethinking the independent Englishman 177097
105
AntiJacobinism and citizenship 17891815
140
Independence versus Old Corruption 181529
162
Independence and the reform debates 183032
187
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
212
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Matthew McCormack is Lecturer in History at University College Northampton.

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