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pendage to every French mansion, a pidated mouth and plain features, as spacious billiard-room, led us to a it catches with keen enjoyment the small ante-chamber, where we were beauties of art, and points them out received with a plain frank courtesy to others with not less eagerness by the Marshal,—a middle-sized, than it discovers them. That is though somewhat corpulent person- Denon, the Egyptian traveller, now age of from fifty to sixty years of in his eighty-fifth year, whose whole age, whose dark curling hair rendered exterior indicates the savant so much somewhat conspicuous the bald patch more than the soldier, that one is in the middle of his head, while his astonished how he could so far have sun-burnt complexion accorded well combined the two, as to gallop with his dark intelligent eye. His round the ruins of the great temple black stock, plain dark coat, and at Luxor in an hour. loose blue trowsers, which, capacious Accompanied by these personages, as they were, could not hide his and others of less celebrity, we bow-legged form, obviously suggest- walked through the sumptuous aed the soldier rather than the cour- partments, all decorated in the most tier, the Marshal rather than the costly and elegant manner, although Duke ; though if I had encountered the gold leaf, as usual in this country, such a figure in London, I should had been spread over the cornices, rather have guessed him to be an and doors, and ceilings, with somehonest East or West India captain. what of gilt-gingerbread prodigality. A Frenchman entitled by birth to In the last room but one we ensimilar rank and fortune would have countered the state bed, of blue embeen forward, and vain, and loqua- broidered satin, with rich gold fringe cious, amid his unmerited distinc- and decorations, the bedstead emtions,—but methought upon Soult's blazoned with gorgeous military trocountenance there sat an air of re- phies and devices; the dogs of the serve, and even awkwardness, in fire-places formed so as to represent doing the honours of his proud man- handsome brass mortars; the walls sion, as if he felt conscious that he painted with martial symbols, and eveassimilated not well with its magni- ry thing in the same warlike consistficence: I could fancy him saying to ency, except a white marble console, himself-Here I stand, a plain sol- on which stood a bust of Louis the dier of fortune, consenting to use eighteenth! This incongruity seemed splendidly the wealth which I have to impart its puzzling contradiction acquired, and the greatness which to my own thoughts. Unable to achas been thrust upon me, but dis- count for the presence of this royal daining to adopt in my own person personage either in the copy or the any of the fopperies of state. original, I threw back my mind a

Beside him, in a round, light- few years, and found it still more incoloured frock-coat descending nearly credible that I myself should be to his feet, stood a tallish thin figure, where I then was, courteously rewhose matted powdered hair, falling ceived by personages who were fiover his forehead and ears like the guring in our papers as implacable sedge of a river-god, seemed to and eternal enemies,--and gazing render still paler his coarse and upon altar-pieces which were then somewhat pock-marked countenance, hallowed by the “dim religious light" which bore an expression of habi- of Spanish cathedrals, or only untual cunning. This was the cele- curtained that they might receive the brated Talleyrand. Distrust and adoration of kneeling nuns, while sasubtlety appeared lurking in his cred music and symphonious hymns peeping eyes, deep set beneath a con- floated around them. The past and tracted brow; and though he looked the present refused to amalgamate in sometimes at the pictures, sometimes my reveries-all seemed a waking at the visitors, his thoughts were not dream—a solecism of fact-a pracwith his looks; his brain was at tical impossibility — an anomalous work, but upon other machinations jumble both of time and place. than the criticising of Murillos. How Roused from this abstraction by different the animated physiognomy the admiration expressed at Murillo's of that vivacious little baldheaded large painting of the Nativity, I proman, whose sparkling black eye de- ceeded to examine it. Having scarce. coys your attention from his dilac ly any thing in England but the Cote tage Girls, Gipsy Boys, and other of his master Juan del Castillio were juvenile polissons of this artist, one too ignoble for his ambition; he was is prepossessed with the idea that he too poor to go to Italy; and though could not elevate himself to the he had access at Madrid to some of poetry of painting and the sublime the works of Rubens and Vandyck, of Scriptural illustration ; but if this he was content with neither a pulpy single picture be not sufficient to re- Venus, nor a full-ruffed portrait, move so erroneous an impression, let but betook himself to the study of the spectator contemplate the Return the great goddess. Exhibiting none of the Prodigal Son, by its side; and of that mannerism, self-display, and their combined effect will banish all pedantry to which I alluded in the his scepticism. In that of Our Sa- outset, he blends every thing harvour at the Pool of Bethesda, the moniously and naturally; and rehead of Christ is conceived to have membering that the object of his art realised that almost unattainable is to please, he lends himself to the perfection-a happy union of the di- expression of amiable and tender vine and human expression; while sentiments with a felicity in which the Angel appearing to St. Peter in no artist has exceeded him. Let any his Prison does not lose the celestial unprejudiced person proceed from the beauty in the look of sympathising annual exposition of the gaudy and earnestness with which he is address theatrical French school at the ing the saint. Almost all the paint, Louvre to Marshal Soult's gallery of ings are of large dimensions, and in Murillos, and he will at once recog. excellent preservation; and not one nise the superiority of native untucan be scrutinised without a con- tored genius over the imitative peviction that Murillo's great teacher dantic efforts of institutions, schools, was Nature. The Fairs and Markets and academies.

H.

SONNETS.

TO THE SKY-LARK.
O EARLIEST singer! O care-charming bird !

Married to morning by a sweeter hymn

Than priest e’er chaunted from his cloister dim
At midnight; or veild virgin's holier word,
At sun-rise, or the paler evening heard ;-

To which of all heaven's young and lovely Hours,

That wreathe soft light in hyacinthine bowers,
Beautiful spirit, is thy suit preferr'a ?-

Unlike the creatures of this low dull earth,

Still dost thou woo although thy suit be won;
And thus thy mistress bright is pleased ever.

Oh! lose not thou this mark of finer birth;
So may'st thou yet live on from sun to sun,
Thy joy uncheck'd, thy sweet song silent never.

B.

A STILL PLACE.

Under what beechen shade, or silent oak,

Lies the mute Sylvan now,-mysterious Pan?
-Once (while rich Peneus and Ilissus ran
Clear from their fountains)—as the morning broke,
'Tis said, the satyr with Apollo spoke,

And to harmonious strife, with his wild reed,
Challenged the god, whose music was indeed
Divine, and fit for heaven.- Each play'd, and woke

Beautiful sounds to life, deep melodies :
One blew his pastoral pipe with such nice care

That flocks and birds all answer'd him; and one
Shook his immortal showers upon the air.

That music hath ascended to the sun ;-
But where the other? --Speak! ye dells and trees!

B.

CONFESSIONS OF A DRUNKARD. DEHORTATIONS from the use of I have known one in that state, strong liquors have been the favourite when he has tried to abstain but for topic of sober declaimers in all ages, one evening,-though the poisonous and have been received with abun- potion had long ceased to bring back dance of applause by water-drinking its first enchantments, though he was critics. But with the patient him- sure it would rather deepen his gloom self, the man that is to be cured, un- than brighten it,-in the violence of fortunately their sound has seldom the struggle, and the necessity he prevailed. Yet the evil is acknow- has felt of getting rid of the present jedged, the remedy simple. Abstain. sensation at any rate, I have known No force can oblige a man to raise him to scream out, to cry aloud, for the glass to his head against his will. the anguish and pain of the strife 'Tis as easy as not to steal, not to within him. tell lies.

Why should I hesitate to declare, Alas! the hand to pilfer, and the that the man of whom I speak is tongue to bear false witness, have no myself? I have no puling apology constitutional tendency. These are to make to mankind. I see them all actions indifferent to them. At the in one way or another deviating from first instance of the reformed will, the pure reason. It is to my own they can be brought off without a nature alone I am accountable for murmur. The itching finger is but the woe that I have brought upon it. a figure in speech, and the tongue of I believe that there are constituthe liar can with the same natural tions, robust heads and iron insides, delight give forth useful truths, with whom scarce any excesses can hurt; which it has been accustomed to whom brandy (I have seen them scatter their pernicious contraries. drink it like wine), at all events But when a man has commenced whom wine, taken in ever so plentisot

ful measure, can do no worse injury O pause, thou sturdy moralist, thou to than just to muddle their faculperson of stout nerves and a strong ties, perhaps never very pellucid. On head, whose liver is happily un- them this discourse is wasted. They touched, and ere thy gorge riseth at would but laugh at a weak brother, the name which I have written, first who, trying his strength with them, learn what the thing is; how much and coming off foiled from the conof compassion, how much of human test, would fain persuade them that allowance, thou may'st virtuously such agonistic exercises are dangermingle with thy disapprobation. ous. It is to a very different de Trample not on the ruins of a man. scription of persons I speak. It is to Exact not, under so terrible a penalty the weak, the nervous ; to those who as infamy, a resuscitation from a state feel the want of some artificial aid to of death almost as real as that from raise their spirits in society to what which Lazarus rose not but by a mi- is no more than the ordinary pitch of racle.

all around them without it. This is Begin a reformation, and custom the secret of our drinking. Such will make it easy. But what if the must fly the convivial board in the beginning be dreadful, the first steps first instance, if they do not mean to not like climbing a mountain but go sell themselves for term of life. ing through fire? what if the whole Twelve years ago I had completed system must undergo a change vio- my six and twentieth year. I had lent as that which we conceive of the lived from the period of leaving school mutation of form in some insects ? to that time pretty much in solitude. what if a process comparable to flay- My companions were chiefly books, ing alive be to be gone through ? is or at most one or two living ones of the weakness that sinks under such my own book-loving and sober stamp. struggles to be confounded with the I 'rose early, went to bed betimes, pertinacity which clings to other and the faculties which God had given vices, which have induced no consti- me, I have reason to think, did not tutional necessity, no engagement of rust in me unused. the whole victim, body and soul ? About that time I fell in with Vol. VI.

K

some companions of a different or- opened my eyes to the supposed quader. They were men of boisterous lities of my first friends. No trace spirits, sitters up a-nights, dispu- of them is left but in the vices which tants, drunken ; yet seemed to have they introduced, and the habits they something noble about them. We infixed. In them my friends survive dealt about the wit, or what passes still, and exercise ample retribution for it after midnight, jovially. Of for any supposed infidelity that I may the quality called fancy I certainly have been guilty of towards them. possessed a larger share than my My next more immediate compacompanions. Encouraged by their nions were and are persons of such applause, I set up for a profest joker! intrinsic and felt worth, that though I, who of all men am least fitted for accidentally their acquaintance has such an occupation, having, in addi- proved pernicious to me, I do not tion to the greatest difficulty which I know that if the thing were to do experience at all times of finding words over again, I should have the couto express my meaning, a natural rage to eschew the mischief at the nervous impediment in my speech! price of forfeiting the benefit. I came

Reader, if you are gifted with to them reeking from the steams of nerves like mine, aspire to any cha- my late over-heated notions of comracter but that of a wit. When you panionship; and the slighest fuel find a tickling relish upon your tongue which they unconsciously afforded, disposing you to that sort of conver- was sufficient to feed my old fires sation, especially if you find a pre- into a propensity. ternatural flow of ideas setting in They were no drinkers, but, one upon you at the sight of a bottle and from professional habits, and another fresh glasses, avoid giving way to it from a custom derived from his faas you would fly your greatest de ther, smoked tobacco. The devil struction. If you cannot crush the could not have devised a more subtle power of fancy, or that within you trap to re-take a backsliding peniwhich you mistake for such, divert tent. The transition, from gulping it, give it some other play. Write down draughts of liquid fire to puffing an essay, pen a character or descrip- out innocuous blasts of dry smoke, tion,-but not as I do now, with was so like cheating him. But he is tears trickling down your cheeks. too hard for us when we hope to

To be an object of compassion to commute. He beats us at barter; friends, of derision to foes; to be and when we think to set off a new suspected by strangers, stared at by failing against an old infirmity, 'tis fools; to be esteemed dull when you odds but he puts the trick upon us of cannot be witty, to be applauded for two for one. That (comparatively) witty when you know that you have white devil of tobacco brought with been dull; to be called upon for the him in the end seven worse than himextemporaneous exercise of that fa- self. culty which no premeditation can It were impertinent to carry the give; to be spurred on to efforts reader through all the processes by which end in contempt; to be set on which, from smoking at first with to provoke mirth which procures the malt liquor, I took my degrees through procurer hatred; to give pleasure and thin wines, through stronger wine be paid with squinting malice; to and water, through small punch, to swallow draughts of life-destroying those juggling compositions, which, wine which are to be distilled into under the name of mixed liquors, slur airy breath to tickle vain auditors; a great deal of brandy or other poito mortgage miserable morrows for son under less and less water continights of madness; to waste whole nually, until they come next to none, seas of time upon those who pay it and so to none at all. But it is hateback in little inconsiderable drops of ful to disclose the secrets of my Targrudging applause,-are the wages tarus. of buffoonery and death.

I should repel my readers, from a Time, which has a sure stroke at mere incapacity of believing me, were dissolving all connexions which have I to tell them what tobacco has been no solider fastening than this liquid to me, the drudging service which I cement, more kind to me than my have paid, the slavery which I have own taste or penetration, at length vowed to it. How, when I have resolved to quit it, a feeling as of in- represented in one point of time. gratitude has started up; how it has When I saw this, I admired the wonput on personal claims and made the derful skill of the painter. But when demands of a friend upon me. How I went away, I wept, because I the reading of it casually in a book, thought of my own condition. as where Adams takes his whiff in Of that there is no hope that it the chimney-corner of some inn in should ever change. The waters Joseph Andrews, or Piscator in the have gone over me. But out of the Complete Angler breaks his fast upon black depths, could I be heard, I a morning pipe in that delicate room would cry out to all those who have Piscatoribus Sacrum, has in a mo- but set a foot in the perilous flood. ment broken down the resistance of Could the youth, to whom the flavor weeks. How a pipe was ever in my of his first wine is delicious as the midnight path before me, till the vi- opening scenes of life or the entersion forced me to realize it,-how ing upon some newly discovered pathen its ascending vapours curled, its radise, look into my desolation, and fragrance lulled, and the thousand be made to understand what a dreary delicious ministerings conversant thing it is when a man shall feel about it, employing every faculty, himself going down a precipice with extracted the sense of pain. How open eyes and a passive will,—to see from illuminating it came to darken, his destruction, and have no power from a quick solace it turned to a to stop it, and yet to feel it all the negative relief, thence to a restless- way emanating from himself; to perness and dissatisfaction, thence to a ceive all goodness emptied out of positive misery. How, even now, him, and yet not to be able to forget when the whole secret stands con- a time when it was otherwise ; to fessed in all its dreadful truth before bear about the piteous spectacle of me, I feel myself linked to it beyond his own self-ruins:-could he see my the power of revocation. Bone of my fevered eye, feverish with last night's bone

drinking, and feverishly looking for Persons not accustomed to exa- this night's repetition of the folly; mine the motives of their actions, to could he feel the body of the death reckon up the countless nails that out of which I cry hourly with feebler rivet the chains of habit, or perhaps and feebler outcry to be delivered, being bound by none so obdurate as it were enough to make him dash those I have confessed to, may recoil the sparkling beverage to the earth from this as from an overcharged in all the pride of its mantling temppicture. But what short of such a tation ; to make him clasp his teeth, bondage is it, which in spite of protesting friends, a weeping wife, and

and not undo 'em . a reprobating world, chains down To suffer wet DAMNATION to run thro'

many a poor fellow, of no original indisposition to goodness, to his pipe Yea, but (methinks I hear someand his pot?

body object) if sobriety be that fine I have seen a print after Corregio, thing you would have us to underin which three female figures are mi- stand, if the comforts of a cool brain nistering to a man who sits fast bound are to be preferred to that state of at the root of a tree. Sensuality is heated excitement which you desoothing him, Evil Habit is nailing scribe and deplore, what binders in him to a branch, and Repugnance at your own instance that you do not the same instant of time is applying return to those habits from which a snake to his side. In his face is you would induce others never to feeble delight, the recollection of past swerve? if the blessing be worth rather than perception of present preserving, is it not worth recoverpleasures, languid enjoyment of evil ing? with utter imbecility to good, a Sy- Recovering! - if a wish could baritic effeminacy, a submission to transport me back to those days of bondage, the springs of the will gone youth, when a draught from the next down like a broken clock, the sin clear spring could slake any heats and the suffering co-instantaneous, which summer suns and youthful or the latter forerunning the former, exercise had power to stir up in the remorse preceding action--all this blood, how gladly would I return to

'em.

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