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elevation of about 8,600 feet above the sea. great scheme of the world's redemption Here the united stream is called by differ- carried forward, by instrumentalities in ent designations, but is known throughout themselves of doubtful justice, but under by the name of the Sutlej. Below the con- the guidance of the infinite and omniscient fluence its general course is south-west, God. To the reflecting mind, the words with a very rapid declivity to Rampoor. of that eccentric but most romantic of fanaFrom this latter spot to Belaspoor, its tics, Dr. Joseph Wolff, seem little more course is generally west and south-west; than the words of soberness, when he de. hence it holds a very winding course to

clares that he considers the British governRoopur, where it makes its way through ment in India to be those kings of the the low sandstone range of Jhejwan, and East predicted in the revelation of St. finally enters the plains of the Punjaub. It John, who will be instrumental in bringing then passes between Philor and Loodhee- the Eastern world to the knowledge and anah, and its width, at the season when acceptance of the Christian faith. lowest, may be stated approximately at Nothing is more remarkable than the 250 yards, with an average depth of seven vigor with which the British are pushing feet. Up to this point the stream is said their conquests in the heart of Asia, unless to be navigable at all seasons, for vessels of it be the ardor with which they are search10 or 12 tons burthen, and steam may be ing the globe for unexplored and habitable made available in light vessels to the very regions. A very valuable account of dis. foot of the hills. The whole length ofthe coveries in Australia, with a description of Sutlej, up to this point, has been estimated the coasts and rivers explored and surveyed at 570 miles, 130 of which may be said to during the voyage of H. M. S. Beagle, from be in the plains.

1837 to 1813 inclusive, has just been pubThese are two of the sides of this con- lished in London ; and this is but a single fiscated territory, which lies in the form of specimen of the similar works which are an equilateral triangle, having upon the almost constantly issuing from the British other side the Himmalaya range for its press. This great field of British coloni. lofty barrier. Its entire area is set down zation has been hitherto but slightly at about 8,500 square miles, and its ag- known: but the results of this exploring gregate annual revenue is not far from expedition have accumulated an immense £400,000. The level part of this country amount of invaluable information concern. is deemed the garden of Upper India, and ing it. The volumes are accompanied by is dotted at slight intervals with large and maps, engravings and everything necessary flourishing cities. First in importance is to elucidate the statements they contain. Jalinder, situated in a tract of amazing fer. They have a good deal of popular interest, tility, amidst flourishing orchards of man- and much more of scientific value. Some of goes and other trees, and, though once a their most curious passages relate to the place of great celebrity, as the vast number habits of the savages, and to their conduct of large and handsome mausoleums in its upon coming for the first time in contact neighborhood would testify, has still, at the with whites. The following brief extract present day, a population of about 40,000. exhibits certainly a novel phase of the maRajwarrah, on the direct route from Loodi- ternal sentiment : anah to Lahore, contains a population of about 15,000, situated in an equally fertile “The reader will remember the native region; and there are also other places, named Alligator, whom I have mentioned Mundee, Kupoorthalao, Kurtapoor, &c., of on a previous visit to Port Essington. I considerable size and wealth. Information

witnessed in his family an instance of affecregarding the hill districts is scanty, but it tion for a departed child, which, though it

exhibited itself in this peculiar manner, was is confidently said that they will be found, extremely touching. The wife had treasured on minute survey, from their more nor- up the bones of the little one, and constantly therly position, to exceed in value any carried them about with her, not as a memento similar portion in the British provinces, mori, but as an object whereon to expend her and that the mineral and other resources tenderest emotions whenever they swelled will amply repay the energy of British en. within her breast. At such times she would terprise, provided that enterprise be di. put together these bones with a rapidity that rected with proper spirit and discretion.

supposed a wonderful knowledge of osteology,

and set them up that she might weep over Here is a vast, rich and most important them. Perhaps, in her imagination, as she region of Central Asia brought at once performed this melancholy rite, the ghastly within the scope of British enterprise and framework before her became indued with civilization. That the result in the end ihe comely form of infancy: bright eyes once will be good, it were distrusting Provi.

more sparkled in those hollow cells, and a dence to doubt. Here, as in China, will a smile of ineffable delight hung where, in new and immense region of the earth, reality, was nought but the hideous grin of hitherto inaccessible, be thrown open to who could feel so finely was some time after

death. I exceedingly regret that the mother the regenerating influences of Christianity wards over-persuaded to part with the bones and Christian institutions. Thus is the of her child."

The French Government, also, manifests American. From inquiries which he had considerable zeal in prosecuting scientific made at the Wesleyan and Baptist Missionresearches into slightly known regions of ary Societies, he had ascertained that the the earth. The Count of Castelnau, charged missionaries of both those societies have with a scientific mission in South America, instructions to promote such objects as announces in a brief letter published in the the cultivation of cotton among the natives Moniteur, that he has accomplished a at their several stations, which extend all journey across the deserts of the American along the coast of Western Africa ; and he Continent, which has heretofore been strongly urged the necessity of their introdeemed impracticable-having gone by ducing the saw-gin, in lieu of the rollerland from the capital of Brazil to that of gin and hand-labor, to free the cotton from Bolivia. Leaving Rio Janeiro on the 8th the seed, and the screw-press for packing of October, 1843, he reached Chuquisaca it into bales for exportation. on the 20th September, 1845, having been The death in Russia of NIKOLAI POLEVOI nearly two years in crossing the deserts in is mourneul by the continental journals as the centre of the Continent. After ex- that of a zealous friend of the literature and ploring the north of Paraguay, he went to cultivation of his country. His life has Matto Grosso, capital of the province of greater interest from the remoteness of the that name, the climate of which is so un- scene of its labors, from general knowledge healthy that none but negroes can bear it. and sympathy. He was born at Inkutsk, In a population of 1,200 he found but four in Siberia, in 1796, and inherited an unwhites, and those were public function. conquerable passion for books, which led aries. On entering the country of the him to embrace literature as a profession, Chiquitos Indians, he visited the magnifi. after many years of dutiful devotion to the cent missions formerly established by the business which his father wished he should priests in the deserts, and was greatly follow. His father's failure and ruin led struck with their grandeur. He then him into literary pursuits, and for ten years crossed the Monte Grande, an immense he edited the Moscow Telegraph, which set forest, greatly dreaded by the Spaniards, the example in that country of a higher and arrived in the waters of the Rio Grande, and more manly tone of criticism. He was which, though very deep and dangerous, the author of a History of Russia, and sevhe was obliged to ford.' Twelve leagues eral other works of considerable merit. further he reached the city of Santa Cruz The Paris papers announce the death, in de la Sierra, where he met, for the first his 94th year, of one who played a conspictime, marks of western civilization. “It uous part in the stormy scenes of a terrible is impossible,” he says, “ to refrain from time-M. Sevestre, a member of the Namentioning the delightful emotions I ex- tional Convention-amongst the most vioperienced, as did also my fellow-travelers, lent—and one of those who voted for the in seeing bread for the first time for two death of the King. He was a member, too, years. After a stay of a month in this city, of the Committee of General Safety; was we left it to ascend the Andes, and in charged with the surveillance of the Royal twenty days we reached Chuquisaca, all in orphans in the Temple; and reported on good health, which appears almost miracu- the death of the Dauphin. He was exiled lous after the fatigues and privations that in 1815: and returned to France after the we were obliged to undergo during this revolution of 1830. long journey across the Continent.” The The death of the Astronomer BESSEL at barometer was carried all the way, and Koningsberg, is justly declared as that of thus the level was constantly taken. He one of the most eminent savans of the age. has sent home various collections, destined An English periodical journal gives an infor public institutions.

teresting outline of his life and his conThe feasibility of cultivating Cotton in tributions to the science to which his lasome other part of the world than America bors were devoted. No one person during has for some time engaged the earnest at the present century has done more for the tention of British statesmen and men of advancement of astronomical knowledge science. In India experiments are still in than he. His time was devoted unceasingly active progress, under the supervision of to the investigation of the heavens; and, Americans. At the meeting of the London by the immense number and accuracy of Society of Arts held on the 22d of April, his observations, he laid down the exact the general subject was made the theme of position of tens of thousands of stars, for a paper by Mr. Banks, who treated it at which he received, in the year 1829, the some length, and with a good deal of abil. gold medal of the Royal Astronomical So. ity. Among other interesting points of ciety of London. Having obtained instruinformation which he set forth, we find it ments of very great power and accuracy, stated that the sea-coast of Africa presents he directed his attention to observing, with a large territory which is capable of being extreme care, the remarkable star, 61 made to produce cotton in larger quantities, Cygni, to endeavor, if possible, to ascertain and of a quality equal if not superior to the the least apparent parallax; and, after a

W

CRITICAL NOTICES.

Pictorial History of England: reprint- who are yet the nation. It is only by a

ed from the London Edition. New consideration of these latter, York. Harper & Brothers.

“Catching the manners living as they rise,” It is, we believe, acknowledged that this that we can see clearly how the “form and pictorial work is in many respects the best pressure ” of one age grow out of that history of England which has yet appeared. which went before it. The growth of civHume's great effort, as a calm and elegant ilization is silent, and the character of a narrative of national movements, changes people is mainly formed at the fireside. It in the government, embracing besides a is this deficiency in other histories of Eng. splendid gallery of portraits—the eminent land that this pictorial work was designed characters of the country-with just to supply; and it cannot be denied, that enough philosophy to preserve it from ap- the design has been successfully carried pearing inerely a narrative, has deservedly out. The reprint by the Harpers is beaureceived the first place among the English tifully executed, the paper and print supeannals. It is not, unfortunately, always rior to the English edition, and most of the trustworthy. We may doubtless rely sub- wood engravings equally fine. The chie stantially on its facts, and most of its por- failure is in those illustrations where faces traits of character ; but the impressions left of men are introduced. Some of these are with the reader, by skillful coloring and poor, possessing not half the spirit and chardisposition of figures—and no man was acter of the original. A little attention to ever more skilled in these arts than Hume these and to some of the more picturesque -the impressions produced about both men buildings, will make the reprint a splendid and measures, were often false in the ex- work. It ought to have a place on the treme. It is especially as the evident zeal- shelves of every American, who cares to ous apologist for the Stuarts, that he is the know the home history of the race from least worthy of confidence. Still, with all whom he is descended. these defects—and they are great onesthe exquisite union of dignity and grace, so

The Puritans and their Principles. By rare in modern writers, the sustained clear.

EDWIN HALL Baker & Scribner, New ness of a style eminently English, the ex

York. clusion of unnecessary details, the Livy. like picturing of great events, and the The main design of this work is exhibitgeneral credibility of the narrative, except ed in the title. It gives the history of the where his prejudices are quite manifest, Puritans from the beginning-develops the have rendered it deserving of nearly all the causes which brought the sect into existpraise lavished upon it, and will always ence and impelled them on step by step in give it a place in ihe language.

their wonderful career, till they finally Turner's History, comparatively dull as a made themselves a home on the shores of book to be read, has greater fullness of New England. The difficulties with which illustration, arising from more antiquarian they had to encounter—the strength of research. Particularly on the Anglo-Sax. principle and character which overcame ons its information is far more satisfactory them-the motives that impelled them onthan Hume's. The philosophic and clas- and the faith which sustained them, are sical Scotsman did not half study up the delivered with great ability. Mr. Hall has subject. But there is one great point in written the work evidently con amore, and which both of these histories, like most of hence takes strong ground in their favor, those which have been produced in all and even sometimes in refusing to see the languages, are extremely deficient. Histo- real defects they exhibit, or at least in as ry should present to us the life of a people. strong a light as a more impartial writer It is of course most important that we would behold them. A Puritan himself in should know the chief political movements, principle, he of course defends the church the revolutions, the battles, the course of policy of the Puritans, shows how it differs diplomacy and commerce, the national in- from the prelatic, and claims for it the stitutions, and the great moral causes that sanction of the Bible. He contends that have conspired to mould the character of a its system is indispensable to true religious people; but it is not less important to be freedom and purity, and indeed to the real come acquainted with their habits and feel freedom and success of governments. He ings, their customs, costumes, dwellings goes thoroughly into his subject, and uses and manufactures, all that makes up the the mass of information he collects to the daily life of the vast majority who have no best advantage. It is a noble subject-the immediate hand in the government, but life and principles of the Puritans-embracing the great principles of human free- Why will he“ join the multitude to do "dom, some of the bravest struggles of lib- badly? Eleven such poets have appeared erty against oppression the world exhibits, within the last seven weeks ! and nobly has he handled it. Many will

“All Bedlam or Parnassus is let out;" doublless disagree with him essentially in

Whose gray goose-quill shall put the host his views of church government, and con

to rout! demn the book as one-sided and partial. To the theologian this part of the subject will be interesting, but to the common An Elementary Treatise on Mineralogy: reader it sinks in insignificance before the Comprising an Introduction to the principles of freedom and equality out of Science; by WILLIAM PHILLIPS. Fifth which it sprung. Puritanism in England edition, from the fourth London edition, changed the fate of the world, and Puritan- by ROBERT ALLEN; containing the ism in America laid the foundations of our latest discoveries in American and republic, and gave birth to that system of foreign Mineralogy ; with numerous education which has made us an example

additions to the Introduction. Ву to the world. The Puritans had their

FRANCIS ALGER. Boston: William faults, and gross ones; but they should be Ticknor & Co. 1844. forgotten in their virtues, and no difference of views in matters of church government

No man of the present day, who has should obscure the latter or lessen the sery.

considered the intimate and beautiful relaice they have done mankind. No clergy

tion which all the physical sciences bear man should be without this book, as it em

to each other, will underrate the value of bodies all the information necessary to form

the study of Mineralogy. It is not, as a correct opinion, and gives of itself a com

every one must feel, so comprehensive and plete history and analysis of the Puritan's

noble, and on the whole so profoundly life and character. We say nothing of its

interesting, as Geology. It bears, indeed, arguments, leaving that to theologians, but

to this great science, as a study, somewhat we commend its principles and spirit to

the same position that the latter does to the reader.

the infinitely sublimer and more compre

hensive lore of Astronomy. It is not so Solitude and Society; and other Poems. absorbingly interesting as Chemistry—for By J. R. BOLLES. Wiley & Putnam.

this science occupies the student with con

stant experiments, and experimentation, Another “ Mute inglorious" in the hem- with its excited hopes and gratified cuisphere of poetical mediocrity, has risen riosity, is the delight of the mind. But upon us in the author of “ Solitude and

mineralogical knowledge, besides affording Society.” The poet has never seen much in itself a brilliant and curious pursuit, is of either, or he would not have sung about absolutely necessary to geological investithem with such various dullness; and if gation. The greater and more general Mr. Bolles “ does not awake and find him- science cannot perfect its knowledge of the self famous we must attribute it to his earth's structure without its minute aids. having slept too long over his strains while Mineralogy embraces also many researches writing them. Solitude and Society” is a in common with Chemistry. Of all the "linked sweetness " stretched out by some works on this attractive science yet pubcaoutchouc process unknown to us, to the lished in this country, the American edition subtil length of eighty-two pages, ex- of Phillips' treatise is undoubtedly the cluding notes. The length and the ine- most complete. It would be strange if it qualities would remind us of the Chinese were not. Of the original work, as edited wall, but that the absence of all strength by Mr. Allen, Prof. Brande, of the Royal or possible service destroys the image. Institution, London, said, that “in the What an opportunity, thought the bard, English language, at least, it is the most for diversified beauties! Accordingly, he available for the use of the student.” But writes it in seventeen or eighteen different Mr. Alger, having the assistance of Dana's combinations of verse. If he must write fine American treatise, with his own ex. wretchedly, why could not the whole be in tended knowledge of the minerals of this one strain, not afflict us with such a variety country and the recent investigations of of fatnesses ! We had forgot, however, French science, has added three hundred that it is exempt from being read. In plain- more pages and one hundred and fifty more spoken verity, we do assure Mr. Bolles-of species and important varieties than are whom we never heard and know nothing- in Allen's edition, together with all the that his book is, for all purposes and effects American localities. He has also corrected of poetry, worthless. The only question numerous errors, presented some arising is, “ whether did this man sin or his chemical analyses and very many new parents,” that he should be suffered, we measurements of crystals. The subject do not say to write, but to print. Doubts of crystallography, indeed, has been treatless he has capacities in another direction. ed in a manner never before equaled; and

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CRITICAL NOTICES.

Pictorial History of England : reprint- who are yet the nation. It is only by a

ed from the London Edition. New consideration of these latter, York. Harper & Brothers.

“Catching the manners living as they rise,” It is, we believe, acknowledged that this that we can see clearly how the “form and pictorial work is in many respects the best pressure” of one age grow out of that history of England which has yet appeared. which went before it. The growth of civ. Hume's great effort, as a calm and elegantilization is silent, and the character of a narrative of national movements, changes people is mainly formed at the fireside. It in the government, embracing besides a is this deficiency in other histories of Eng. splendid gallery of portraits-the eminent land that this pictorial work was designed characters of the country-with just to supply; and it cannot be denied, that enough philosophy to preserve it from ap- the design has been successfully carried pearing inerely a narrative, has deservedly out. The reprint by the Harpers is beaureceived the first place among the English tifully executed, the paper and print supeannals. It is not, unfortunately, always rior to the English edition, and most of the trustworthy. We may doubtless rely sub- wood engravings equally fine. The chie stantially on its facts, and most of its por. failure is in those illustrations where faces traits of character ; but the impressions left of men are introduced. Some of these are with the reader, by skillful coloring and poor, possessing not half the spirit and chardisposition of figures—and no man was acter of the original. A little attention to ever more skilled in these arts than Hume these and to some of the more picturesque -the impressions produced about both men buildings, will make the reprint a splendid and measures, were often false in the ex- work. It ought to have a place on the treme. It is especially as the evident zeal. shelves of every American, who cares to ous apologist for the Stuarts, that he is the know the home history of the race from least worthy of confidence. Still, with all whom he is descended. these defects—and they are great onesthe exquisite union of dignity and grace, so

The Puritans and their Principles. By rare in modern writers, the sustained clear. ness of a style eminently English, the ex

Edwin Hall Baker & Scribner, New

York. clusion of unnecessary details, the Livy. like picturing of great events, and the The main design of this work is exhibit. general credibility of the narrative, excepted in the title. It gives the history of the where his prejudices are quite manifest, Puritans from the beginning-develops the have rendered it deserving of nearly all the causes which brought the sect into exist. praise lavished upon it, and will always ence and impelled them on step by step in give it a place in the language.

their wonderful career, till they finally Turner's History, comparatively dull as a made themselves a home on the shores of book to be read, has greater fullness of New England. The difficulties with which illustration, arising from more antiquarian they had to encounter-the strength of research. Particularly on the Anglo-Sax. principle and character which overcame ons its information is far more satisfactory ther-the motives that impelled them onthan Hume's. The philosophic and clas- and the faith which sustained them, are sical Scotsman did not half study up the delivered with great ability. Mr. Hall has subject. But there is one great point in written the work evidently con amore, and which both of these histories, like most of hence takes strong ground in their favor, those which have been produced in all and even sometimes in refusing to see the languages, are extremely deficient. Histo- real defects they exhibit, or at least in as ry should present to us the life of a people. strong a light as a more impartial writer It is of course most important that we would behold them. A Puritan himself in should know the chief political movements, principle, he of course defends the church the revolutions, the battles, the course of policy of the Puritans, shows how it differs diplomacy and commerce, the national in- from the prelatic, and claims for it the stitutions, and the great moral causes that sanction of the Bible. He contends that have conspired to mould the character of a its system is indispensable to true religious people; but it is not less important to be freedom and purity, and indeed to the real come acquainted with their habits and feel freedom and success of governments. He ings, their customs, costumes, dwellings goes thoroughly into his subject, and uses and manufactures, all that makes up the the mass of information he collects to the daily life of the vast majority who have no best advantage. It is a noble subject-the immediate hand in the government, but life and principles of the Puritans-em

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