The Human Intellect: with an Introduction Upon Psychology and the Soul

Εξώφυλλο
C. Scribner, 1873 - 673 σελίδες
 

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Περιεχόμενα

the subject of a judgment is expressed in language 430 How does the logical differ from
433
Deduction and the Syllogism
443
REASONING VARIETIES OF DEDUCTION
454
The construction of geometrical figures Auxiliary linesTentative processes often required
464
Importance of a correct theory of inductionExamples of inductions of common life
470
476 Require more discriminating observations 477 The inductions of science more
476
most successful interpreter of nature ? 498 The capacity of ready deduction 499
494
THEORIES OF INTUITIVE KNOWLEDGE
517
discerned by the light of nature 530 That they are innate or connate 531 The views
533
velopment of the several relations of extensionVoid or inclosing space Matter incloses void
539
Of Mutual Relations of Extended and Enduring Objects
541
ments which involve number and magnitudeWhence standards for both are derivedHow they
549
Of the Application of Mathematical Relations to Psychical Phenomena
557
Of Space and Time as Infinite and Unconditioned
562
Duration how related to the acts of the soulThe acts of the soul not distinguished
564
CAUSATION AND THE RELATION OF CAUSATION
569
Many events are combined of severalEvery cause is an acting being 589 Causes distin
588
Terms explained Formal material efficient and final causes 606 Design
605
MIND AND MATTER
619
The Mutual Relations of Material and Spiritual Substance next claim
634
Of ihe Real as opposed to the Phenomenal
640
Spiritual or mental substance misconceivedTo know feel and will are causative
646
The Infinite and the Absolutetheir Relations to the Finite and Dependent
647

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Σελίδα 276 - Besides this, there is another connexion of ideas wholly owing to chance or custom : ideas that in themselves are not at all of kin, come to be so united in some men's minds that it is very hard to separate them ; they always keep in company, and the one no sooner at any time comes into the understanding, but its associate appears with it; and if they are more than two which are thus united, the whole gang, always inseparable, show themselves together.
Σελίδα 417 - Likewise the idea of man that I frame to myself, must be either of a white, or a black, or a tawny, a straight or a crooked, a tall or a low, or a middle-sized man.
Σελίδα 456 - Euclid's, and show by construction that its truth was known to us ; to demonstrate, for example, that the angles at the base of an isosceles triangle are equal...
Σελίδα 417 - For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle (which is yet none of the most abstract comprehensive and difficult) for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon, but all and none of these at once.
Σελίδα 309 - But our ideas being nothing but actual perceptions in the mind, which cease to be any thing, when there is no perception of them, this laying up of our ideas in the repository of the memory, signifies no more but this, that the mind has a power in many cases to revive perceptions, which it has once had, with this additional perception annexed to them, that it has had them before.
Σελίδα 417 - Now, if we will annex a meaning to our words and speak only of what we can conceive, I believe we shall acknowledge that an idea which, considered in itself, is particular, becomes general by being made to represent or stand for all other particular ideas of the same sort.
Σελίδα 117 - The understanding, like the eye, whilst it makes us see and perceive all other things, takes no notice of itself: And it requires art and pains to set it at a distance, and make it its own object.
Σελίδα 318 - Thou didst swear to me upon a parcel-gilt goblet, sitting in my Dolphin chamber, at the round table, by a sea-coal fire, upon Wednesday in Wheeson week, when the Prince broke thy head for liking his father to a singing-man of Windsor— thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me and make me my lady thy wife.
Σελίδα 87 - This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself : and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense.
Σελίδα 367 - Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical. Because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence.

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