Primitive Industry: Or, Illustrations of the Handiwork, in Stone, Bone and Clay, of the Native Races of the Northern Atlantic Seaboard of America

Εξώφυλλο
G.A. Bates, 1881 - 560 σελίδες
 

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Συχνά εμφανιζόμενοι όροι και φράσεις

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Σελίδα 2 - ... us, and as well, or better, if we may believe what our Forefathers have told us. We had then Room enough, and Plenty of Deer, which was easily caught; and tho...
Σελίδα 217 - did not indicate their original use, the peculiar traces of wear which they exhibit would furnish almost conclusive evidence of the manner in which they have been employed ; for that part with which the digging was done appears, notwithstanding the hardness of the material, perfectly smooth, as if glazed, and slightly striated in the direction in which the implement penetrated the ground.
Σελίδα 393 - I was surprised to find the value these people attach to this medicine. They begged and implored Col. Murphy to recover it for them, and promised to pay the Utes as many horses as they wanted, and also to make a permanent and lasting peace not only with the Utes, but also to refrain from further depredations on the Texas border, if this should be restored. Col. Murphy promised to endeavor to recover it, but I think his success in the matter will be doubtful, as the Utes also attach great importance...
Σελίδα 38 - In cutting trees, fire was applied at the root, and the chisel used to clear away the coal. By a repetition of the process, trees were felled and cut to pieces. Wooden vessels were hollowed out by the same means. Fire and the chisel were the substitutes for the axe. The chisel was usually about six inches long, three wide, and two thick ; the lower end being fashioned like the edge of an axe. Stone gouges in the form of a convex chisel, were also used when a more regular concavity of the vessel was...
Σελίδα 325 - Generally all the Men throughout the Countrey have a Tobacco-bag with a pipe in it, hanging at their back; sometimes they make such great pipes, both of wood and stone, that they are two...
Σελίδα 370 - ... it may reasonably be concluded from the uniform shape of these articles, and from their apparent unfitness as implements, as also from the wide range of their occurrence, that they were invested with a conventional significance as insignia, or badges of distinction, or as amulets. We know that the custom of wearing certain stones as preventives of disease, or as safeguards against accidents or the malice of evil spirits, has not been confined to one continent, or to a single age.. It is not entirely...
Σελίδα 138 - I not observed it in actual use, and had noticed it amongst the material of the buttes, I should have viewed it as an accidental spawl. It consists of a thin segment of a quartzite boulder, made by striking the stone with a smart blow. The implement is circular or oval with a sharp edge, convex on one side, and flat on the other. It is called a ' teshoa,' and is employed as a scraper in dressing buffalo skins.
Σελίδα 140 - Greenland, thinks he has discovered a great resemblance between this stone implement and the bone implement, provided with a handle, which is there used for stretching skins in order to give them the requisite softness. A somewhat similar stretching implement of iron is still used in those parts of Scania where the winter dress of the peasantry consists of sheep-skin coats...
Σελίδα 307 - I have seen several which were 15 in. or more in length and about 2% in. wide in the widest part. Pieces as large as these are carried aloft in the hand in the dance, wrapped with skin or cloth to prevent the rough edges from lacerating the hand, but the smaller ones are mounted on wooden handles and glued fast. The large ones can not be purchased at any price, but I. procured some about 6 in. long at $2.50 apiece. These are not properly 'knives,' but jewelry for sacred purposes, passing current...
Σελίδα 439 - Acadia must live; and I venture to predict that it will yet figure honorably in the history of this western world. The resources of the Acadian provinces must necessarily render them more wealthy and populous than any area of the same extent on the Atlantic coast from the Bay of Fundy to the Gulf of Mexico, or in the St. Lawrence Valley from the sea to the head of the Great Lakes. Their maritime and mineral resources constitute them the Great Britain of eastern America, and though merely agricultural...

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