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Ramree School.

THIRTEENTH YEAR.

Under the Superintendence of CAPTAIN T. P. SPARKS,

Principal Assistant Commissioner at Ramree.

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The following full report on the

state and prospects of the school was received from Captain T. P. Sparks : “ The only changes which have taken place during the session are

A great increase in the number of scholars, as shown in the tabular list of pupils, which is a most satisfactory proof that the institution is rapidly rising in the estimation of the people.

“ Government has been pleased to sanction the full salary of 30 rupees being paid to Moung Kala, the head Vernacular teacher, who has hitherto

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only been receiving 15 rupees, the other half of his salary having been withheld until he rendered himself more competent for his situation, which he has now done.

“I have no suggestion to offer regarding the studies or internal economy of the school.

“ Two prizes of 8 rupees each by myself for regular attendance and general good conduct in the two departments.

“The examination was held on the 29th and 30th September, that of the English department being conducted by myself, and that of the Vernacular, by Kudee Mijothoogyee and Moung Khuing Sheristedar.

No First Class.--Second Class.—“ Two boys. Average age, 155 years.

“ Progress but small, except of the head boy Hatim in Arithmetic. Last year he was slow and uncertain in his work, this year he produced the answers to the sums set him, with rapidity and correctness. His recollection and understanding of all that he has learnt, except History, are very satisfactory. The other boy Shoongboing (a prize boy of last year) failed in Arithmetic, as well as in History and Geography, but he appeared very nervous, and the head master assured me he expected a very different result. Two boys of this class have left the school during the past year, one to continue his education at Calcutta, the other to set up in business. I recommend Hatim for a prize of 10 rupees.

Third Class.—“Four boys. Average age, 121.

“ This class has made fair progress in Reading and Arithmetic, not much in Grammar and Geography. It is against the other three boys, who are each only 11, having one slow lad of 16 among them. I shall therefore remove him shortly, as he is too old, by far, for a third class. In all that they have learnt, these boys have displayed a very creditable intelligence, their translation of their English lessons was particularly ready and correct. In Arithmetic also there was a great improvement upon last

year. I recommend Ikram Ali and Thoon Zea for prizes of 8 and 7 rupees respectively; they have not gained the most numbers absolutely, but the most in proportion to the length of time they have been in the school.

Fourth Class, Section 1.—“ Six boys. Average age, 1017.

“ This is a very good class; three of the boys, viz., Andir Hosain Shoony Weng and Shoony Mo (the last particularly,) promise to do credit to the school, their translation of their English lessons and their English dictation were remarkably creditable. I recommend Shoony Mo and Shoony Weng for prizes of 6 and 5 rupees respectively,

Hadee, the Myothoogyee of Ramree, a native gentleman distinguished for his liberality, has kivdly presented Shoony Mo (who is an orphan and his friends extremely poor) with a complete set of all the English books that he will require as long as he remains in the school.

Fourth Class, Section B.—“ Ten boys. Average age, 94 years.

“ Also a very good class, considering the time they have been at school, except Shoony Kha and Ray Pau Thoo, who made a very poor figure compared with the others. I recommend Chinoo and Shoony Nee for prizes of 4 and 3 rupees respectively.

Fourth Class, Section C.-“ Fifty-two boys. Average age, 8 years.

“ Pronunciation, which was last year very bad, is now clear and distinct, and they are able to give the meaning of all the words they have learnt to spell and read. I have given a prize of 8 rupees to Chanoung for regular attendance and good conduct, he not having been absent from school one day during the whole session.

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Vernacular Department.

First Class.-“ Fifteen boys. Average

age, 15 years. "Generally satisfactory, with the exception of the four last boys, whose progress and attainments are very low, the last of all, Enga, being 19 years old, and wanting alike in diligence and capacity, I have expelled, as it is useless keeping on the Returns so hopeless a pupil

. Shoony Pau Oo and Khyut Pau Oo are recommended for prizes of 10 and 9 rupees respectively. I have also given Shoony Pau Oo a prize of 8 rupees for regular attendance and general good conduct, he having been absent only one day during the session, and that owing to sickness.

Second Class.-“ Fifteen boys. Average age, 12 years.

“ Except in Arithmetic, when they acquitted themselves well, this class is not what it ought to be, and the attention of the Vernacular teacher will be particularly directed to it during the ensuing session. Tsan Pau Oo and Thaloo are recommended for prizes of 8 and 7 rupees.

Third Class.—“ Thirteen boys. Average age, 10 years.

" This class acquitted itself creditably, Shoony Poo and Moung Kala are recommended for prizes of 6 and 5 rupees respectively.

Fourth Class.-“ Twenty-six boys. Average age, 8 years.

“ Chiefly beginners, promise well, being of a good age. Nyn Leng Way and Myat Thoo are recommended for prizes of 4 and 3 rupees.

“ Having thus reviewed each class separately, I would sum up by saying that I consider the school to be in a much more healthy state than it has ever been since it has been under my superintendence. Arithmetic, formerly neglected, or at least very imperfectly taught, is now understood, and the sums worked out rapidly, neatly and correctly, instead of as before, where, after a long time spent in the calculation, the result was generally wrong, and very frequently the way in which the sum was stated, or some extraordinary method of operation, proved at once that the boy had no clear conception of what he was about.

“ The translation from English into the Vernacular was in every class extremely good, and the second class acquitted themselves very creditably, in the more difficult task of translating from the Vernacular into English.

“ The writing of English from dictation, a test to which I attach much value, was also generally very good.

“ The appearance of the boys was remarkably clean and neat, and they behaved throughout the whole of the examination with perfect propriety and decorum.

“ In conclusion, I am of opinion, that great praise is due to the head master, Mr. DaCosta, and his assistant teachers, for the pains they have taken with the school during the past year, and that, taking into consideration the difficulties they have had to contend with, as above stated, they have done every thing in their power to do justice to their pupils and credit to the institution. Last year I had to find fault with Shoony Weng, the English monitor, for the backward state of the junior classes under his superintendence. My rebuke has not been thrown away, and I had much pleasure in commending him, at the present esamination, for the marked improvement I found in all those points to which I had specially directed his attention.

“ The state of the books in the library is good.

“ The school room is a mere shed, and too small for the number it is made to contain. It is in good repair."

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The following is Mr. Robinson's report:

“ The number of pupils borne on the books of the Gowbatty School amounted, on the 30th September last, to 245. There were 40 names on the rolls of the English department, with an average daily attendance of 36. In the Bengali school there were 205, and the daily attendance has varied during the year from 150 to 180. Forty-seven of the boys, included in either the English or the Bengali department, have also been engaged in the study of Urdu and Persian, under the tuition of Moonshee Kassim Ally, whose support is derived from local subscriptions.

“I spent five consecutive days, from the 13th to the 17th ultimo, in examining the pupils of this institution, and am happy in being able to state that there has been a marked improvement in the progress of the several classes. This is particularly the case in the Bengali department, where the various subjects of study seem to have had their due share of attention, from both pupils and teachers. The late master of the English school, Babu Jogot Chunder Mookerjee, having tendered his resignation in May last, was succeeded by Babu Kalidass Bhose from the Sibsagor School. He has not been sufficiently long in office to effect any decided improvement in the state of the classes under his tuition, but as he has set himself zealously to work, I have little doubt but that he will soon be as successful at Gowhatty as he was in the school he has just left.

“ The annual public examination the school was held on the 18th ultimo, and I believe the result was very satisfactory to all who were engaged in the examination of the classes.”

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The following is the report of the English master, Kalidass Bose:

“The Gowahatty school is divided into three departments, the English, the Bengali and the Urdu. The total number of pupils under tuition amounts to 245, whose ages vary from 6 to 19. The senior pundit of the school, Gopinath Nyalankar, and Kassimally Munshee will as usual report to you on the state of the departments over which they preside, and it only remains for me to dwell briefly on the present studies of the pupils in the English department.

" This branch of the school numbers 40 pupils, who are divided into 5 classes.

" The first class consists of 5 boys, and the following is a statement of their studies :

Goldsmith's History of Greece, to page 48
Marshman's History of India,
Historical Class Book,

36
Poetical Reader, No. I.,

26 Clift's Geography,

32 Lennie's Grammar,

117 Arithmetic, Vulgar Fractions. " The second class consists of 9 boys; they have read Marshman's History of Bengal to page 22, the narrative pieces of the English Reader No. IV., Clift's Geography to page 13, Murray's abridged Grammar as far as the Verbs; and in Arithmetic as far as Compound Multiplication.

In the third class, there are but 4 boys; these have read and translated 77 pages of the English Reader No. I. In Grammar, they have entered on the Rules of Syntax as given in Woollaston's Grammar, and have lately commenced the study of Geography. In Arithmetic, they have proceeded as far as Simple Division.

“ There are 5 boys in the fourth class, who have read and translated 8 pages of the Reader No. I., and have gone as far as Simple Subtraction in Arithmetic.

“The last class numbers 17 boys, who are yet at the Primer and Spelling Book. Most of these have but lately entered school and their degree of improvement varies with the length of the period each has been under tuition.

“ The new pupils who have entered the school during the period under report, are most of them natives of the province, and though their number has not been so large as I could have wished, it is still an evidence, as my predecessor observed in his last report, of an improved state of feeling in the people generally, and of an increasing desire for instruction in the English language.

Of the general behaviour of the students in my department, I am happy to be able to report favorably, and I would also indulge the hope that they are all sufficiently interested in their studies to induce them to apply to them with diligence.”

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