The Alliance of Musick, Poetry and Oratory: Under the Head of Poetry is Considered the Alliance and Nature of the Epic and Dramatic Poem, as it Exists in the Iliad, Æneid, and Paradise Lost

Εξώφυλλο
J. Stockdale, 1789 - 384 σελίδες
 

Τι λένε οι χρήστες - Σύνταξη κριτικής

Δεν εντοπίσαμε κριτικές στις συνήθεις τοποθεσίες.

Άλλες εκδόσεις - Προβολή όλων

Συχνά εμφανιζόμενοι όροι και φράσεις

Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 361 - MAN, that is born of a woman, hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay.
Σελίδα 285 - Awake : The morning shines, and the fresh field Calls us ; we lose the prime, to mark how spring Our tender plants, how blows the citron grove, What drops the myrrh, and what the balmy reed, How nature paints her colours, how the bee Sits on the bloom extracting liquid sweet.
Σελίδα 366 - God, from whom all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works do proceed: Give unto thy servants that peace which the world cannot give; that both our hearts may be set to obey thy commandments, and also that by thee we, being defended from the fear of our enemies, may pass our time in rest and quietness, through the merits of Jesus Christ our Saviour.
Σελίδα 289 - With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
Σελίδα 318 - Henceforth I learn that to obey is best, And love with fear the only God, to walk As in his presence, ever to observe His providence, and on him sole depend...
Σελίδα 140 - This was a stock of knowledge sufficient for a mind -so capable of appropriating and improving it. But the greater part of his excellence was the product of his own genius. He found the English stage in a state...
Σελίδα 183 - Astonied stood and blank, while horror chill Ran through his veins, and all his joints...
Σελίδα 103 - These times, though many a friend bewail, These times bewail not I. But when the world's loud praise is thine, And spleen no more shall blame: When with thy Homer thou shalt shine In one establish'd fame!
Σελίδα 121 - Much matter uttered she of weight, in place whereas she sat: And proved plain there was no beast, nor creature bearing life, Could well be known to live in love without discord and strife: Then kissed she her little babe and sware by God above, The falling out of faithful friends renewing is of love.
Σελίδα 184 - They that go down to the sea in ships: and occupy their business in great waters: These men see the works of the Lord: and his wonders in the deep. For at his word the stormy wind ariseth: which lifteth up the waves thereof.

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