Tribute to Gallaudet: A Discourse in Commemoration of the Life, Character and Services, of the Rev. Thomas H. Gallaudet, LL.D., Delivered Before the Citizens of Hartford, Jan. 7th, 1852

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Brockett & Hutchinson, 1852 - 267 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 183 - Yea, so have I strived to preach the gospel, not where Christ was named, lest I should build upon another man's foundation: but, as it is written, To whom he was not spoken of, they shall see : and they that have not heard shall understand.
Σελίδα 186 - O, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, » And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven, O, how canst thou renounce^ and hope to be forgiven ! These charms shall work thy soul's eternal health, And love, and gentleness, and joy,...
Σελίδα 177 - For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving. For it is sanctified by the word of God and prayer.
Σελίδα 21 - Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped. Then shall the lame man leap as a hart, and the tongue of the dumb sing : for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert.
Σελίδα 185 - Nothing in all literature and all philosophy equals this sublime and radiant idea, the light of the knowledge of the glory of God, as it shines in the face of Jesus Christ our Lord.
Σελίδα 141 - American Asylum, at Hartford, for the Education and Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb Exhibited to the Asylum, May 16th, 1846.
Σελίδα 214 - God; to comfort all that mourn ; to appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified.
Σελίδα 47 - The soul of a true Christian, as I then wrote my meditations, appeared like such a little white flower as we see in the spring of the year; low and humble on the ground, opening its bosom to receive the pleasant beams of the sun's glory; rejoicing as it were in a calm rapture; diffusing around a sweet fragrancy; standing peacefully and lovingly, in the midst of other flowers round about; all in like manner opening their bosoms, to drink in the light of the sun.
Σελίδα 186 - I lay down this position ; that if it is our duty to instil divine truth into the minds of children as soon as they are able to receive it; if we are bound by the injunction of Christ to convey the glad news of salvation to...
Σελίδα 166 - Society; and by that name they and their successors shall and may have perpetual succession; shall be capable of suing and being sued, pleading and being impleaded, in all suits of whatever name and nature; may have a common seal and may alter the same at pleasure; and may also purchase, receive, hold, and convey any estate, real or personal, to an amount not exceeding one hundred thousand dollars.

Σχετικά με τον συγγραφέα (1852)

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1811, Henry Barnard was educated at Yale University. Barnard supported legislation to provide for better schools in Connecticut and, in doing so, he followed the reforms initiated in Massachusetts by Horace Mann. Barnard later instituted educational reforms in Rhode Island where he started several school libraries. After various academic appointments, including one as president of St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, Barnard became the first U.S. commissioner of education (1867-70). In this position, he was influential in shaping the future direction of the U.S. Office of Education. He initiated numerous reforms and promoted the importance of education in general through federally sponsored experimentation, research, and scholarship and the collection and dissemination of educational statistics and information. Barnard's emphasis on a need to create common school districts throughout the United States was based on his strong belief in public education and the notion that schools should foster moral education and temper social unrest. In addition to his books, which cover a wide range of educational issues and concerns, Barnard was the founder and editor of a widely read journal, The American Journal of Education (1855-82).

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