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Orpheus and Eurydice, 350 ; Dame
Erodys, 351; other Romances—Chro-
nicle of Lazamon, and of Robert of
Gloucester, 352; Langloft's Chronicle,
353; character of true English poetry,

355.
Education. By Thomas Binney ; reasons

for dissent, 257; dissenters' grammar
school, 258; intolerance towards dis-
senters in education, 259; pleas for
liberty, 260; minutes of council, 261;
province of government, 262, 263 ;
views of Mr. Binney, 265, 266; of the
Presbyterian Synod of Scotland, 267;

equitable plans, 268.
Education Controversy. By E. Edwards,

528; minutes of council, 529; Dr.
Vaugban's views of them, 530; his
opposition to them, 531; opposition of
dissenters, 532; desired alterations,
533; the new minute, 534 ; its liberal
construction, 535; issue of the minutes,
536; unjust censures of those approving
the new minute, 538; separation of
secular and religious, 539; the best
system of education, 540; views of
Dr. Chalmers, 541; what the question
has done, 542; antagonism of dissen-
ters, 543; position of Dr. Vaughan,

544.
Education of the People. By Willm, 559.
Fairchild Family. By

Mrs. Sherwood, 554.
First Impressions of England and its

People, 284.
Firstlings of Fancy. By G. Hume, 276.
Fitzgerald's Sermops, 556.
Footsteps of Messiah. By Rev. W. Leask,

286.
Foster's, John, Lectures, 269.
Free Church; Cheap Publications; Scot-

tish History, by Dr. McCrie; Memoirs

of Halyburton ; Revivals, 556.
French Revolution, History of. By Mi-

chelet, 278.
Friends in Council, Headings and Dis-

courses, 134; character of the essays,
135; essay on truth, 136, 137 ; on con-
formity, 138; discriminating remarks,
139; on despair, 141; on the creation,
142; Merrie England, 143, 144;, on
greatness, 144 ; in what it consists,
145; on the art of living with others,
146, 148 ; offended and gratified vanity,
149; on education, 150; groundwork
of tolerance, 151; intellectual educa-
rion, 15%; education of women, 153;
claims on social affection, 154; friend-
ship, public improvements, history, 154,
155.

NO. XII.

Geography. By J. Cornwall, 277.
Geology of Russia in Europe, and the
Ural Mountains. By

R. I. Murchison,
289; vast regions of European Russia,
290; their physical aspect and people,
291; Sir R. Murchison's investigations
in Russia, 292; old red sandstone, 293;
interesting deposits, 294 ; specimens of
fishes ; coal beds, 296 ; magnesian lime-
stone, 297 ; copper, salt, freezing cave,
298; Jurassic deposits, 299; Caspian
sea, 300; its recent contracted limits,
301 ; Russian miners, 302; the Ural
chain, 303; its stores of iron, copper,
and precious metals, 304 ; Malachite
and mineral riches, 305; quantities of
gold, 306 ; diamonds, garnets, and gold,
307 ; remains of the mammoth and
other monsters, 308; antediluvian ivory,
309; boulders of various kinds, their
origin, 310; black earth of Russia,
311, 312; effects of cultivation, 313;

importance of this publication, 314.
Gaol System. By J. Adshead, 278.
German Fairy Tales. Translated from

the Collection of MM. Grimm, by Ed-
gar Taylor ; Village Tales. Translated
by Meta Taylor, 189; works of fiction,
how regarded hy Dr. A. Clarke, 190 ;
their utility, 191; origin of these Ger-
man tales, 192 ; rural superstition, 193;
natural to us, 194; German beast sto-
ries, 195; the bear and tits, 196;
Chanticleer and Partlet, 197, 198 ;
Hans in Luck, 199; Rosebud, 200 ;
Rumpel-stilts-ken, 201; Master Snip,
202; the Bear and the Skrattel, 203 ;
Hansel and Grethel, 205, 206; the Fox's
Brush, 207 ; Auerbach's Village Sto-
ries, 208; Peasant Life, 209 ; Sepper,

and Tonde, 210, 211 ; Ivo, 212.
Glimpses of the Old World. By Dr.

Clark, 274.
Good Man, the. By J. Blackburn, 558.
Gurney, J. J., brief Memoir of. By J.

Alexander, 558.
Hebrew Grammar. By Rev. W. Burgh,

285.
Henry VIII., his Supremacy. By G.

Offer, 277.
Hindu Medical Missions, 356 ; missions

by the apostles, 347; Celsus, a Roman
physician, 358, modern science and
ancient physicians, 359 ; medical and
surgical science needed by missionaries,
360; dangers of childbirth in India;
361, 362; treatment of children, 363 ;
prevalence of disease, 364; medical
treatment, 365; bindrance of caste,

оо

366 : example of Jesus to missionaries,
368 ; medical missions and native
agency, 369; medical schools and stu-
dents in Calcutta, 370; in Hindustan
and Ceylon, 371: Colonel Sykes's sta-
tistics, 372; difficulties in employing
Hindu practitioners, 373 ; medical
schools needed in Africa, Ceylon, Aus-
tralia, China, 374.
History of Rome. By Dr. L. Schmitz,

280.
Hobbes, Thomas, the English works of.

By Sir W. Molesworth, 155; motives
of the editor, 156; principles of Hobbes,
157; his early life and education, 158;
tutor to the Earl of Devon, his literary
friend, 159; he translates Thucydides,
appointed tutor to the young Earl of
Devon, 160; he adopts as truth that
motion produces all phenomena, 161 :
danger to liberty in England, 162; the
Long Parliament, 163 ; his Leviathan,
the state of absolute power, 164; its
representation, 165 ; its principles, 166,
168, 169; those of Berkeley and Hume,
170; speculations of Hobbes, 171 ; his
sceptical speculations, 172 ; origin of
speech, 173, 175; his annihilation of
moral distinctions, 176; his denial of
voluntary actions, 178; do occupation
for conscience, 179; immorality of his
potions, 180, 181 ; fundamental maxims
of Hobbes, 182, their perniciousness,
183 ; his inconsistencies, 184, 185, his
enmity against the Scriptures, 186; bis
miserable end of life, 187 ; influence of
his writings, 187, 188.
Home Influence. By G. Aguilar, 550.
Human Mind, Estimate of. By Dr. Da-

vies, 279.
Ireland Sixty Years ago, 553.
Irish Popular Songs. By E. Walsh, 558.
James's, Rev. J. A., Earnest Ministry,

551.
Josephus, Works of, a new Translation.

By Dr. Traill, 281.
Knibb, W., Memoir of. By J. Hinton,

271.
Lander, W.S., Works of, 282.
Lands of the Bible Visited and Described.

By J. Wilson, D.D., F.R.S., 2 vols.,
459; Asia the ancient seat of popula-
tion, Dr. Wilson's labours in, 460;
claims of his work, 461; Jews, Mo-
hammedans, 464; Suez, tolerance of
Mohammed Ali, 465; Cairo, 466 ; life
of Mohammed Ali, 467; his educa-
tional policy, 468; the Israelites' pas-
sage of the Red Sea, 469, 470; Dr.

Wilson on Dr. Robinson's conjecture,
471, 473 ; journey to Sinai, 474, 475;
the bitter Marah, 476; the Written
Valley, 477, 478; Mount Sinai, 479,
480; Valley of Petra and Mount Sinai,
481; beauty of Judea, 482; town of
Hebron, 483, 484; Bethlehem, 485;
tomb of Rachel, 487; Jerusalem, 488,

489.
Letter from Rome. By Dr. Middleton,

287.
Libraries, Public, in London and Paris,

72; public grants for education and
science, 73; British Museum, 74; b-
braries of London, Archbishop Teni-
son's, 75; Dr. Williams's, 76; Sir Hans
Sloane's, 77; British Museum, 78; ad-
ditions to it, 79; gift of George IV. of
Sir R. C. Hoare, of Mr. Grenville, 80;
rare works, 81: Bibles, 82, 83; col.
lection of pamphlets, 84; Thomason's,
85; its value, 86 ; and importance, 87;
collection of Paris tracts, 88; and ra-
rious others, 89; foreign public libra-
ries, 90, 91; Chinese and other works
added to the British library, 92; Forks
purchased, 93; deficiencies in important
foreign works, 94; additions of valgable
works, 95, 96 ; accommodation at the
library, 97; numbers of books supplied
to readers, 98; catalogues, 99, 100;
difficulties in the catalogues, 101, 102;
examples, 103, 104; Dr. O. Gregory's
plan for making a new catalogue, 105;
plan of a lending library, 107, 108; nev
buildings at the library, 109 ; its mag-
nitude, 110; Sion College Library,
111; total of the London public libra.
ries, and of those in Paris, 112; sup-
port and number of readers at the
libraries of Paris, 113 ; suggestions for

two new libraries in London, 114.
Luther's Hymns, translated, 555.
Lyrical Poems, by Beranger, 286.
Maurice, Rev. F. D., on Conscientious

Subscription, 115. See Characteristies

of Dissent.
M'Kean, Memoirs of. By the Rer. J.

A. Miller, 555.
Mohammed, Life of, 556.
Moral Evil, on the Divine permission of.

By Rev. T. M. Ready, 288.
Motherwell's Poems, 275.
Newspaper Press and Political Literature

of Spain, 315; its ancient literature and
arts by the Moors, 316 ; decline of
literature in Spain, the Inquisition,
317 ; danger of literary men, 318; si-
tempts to establish journals, 319; sap-

90

pressed by Ferdinand VII., 320 ; recent
papers, 321; the Universal, El Correo,
Gaceta de Madrid, 322; character of
the Gaceta, 323; the Clamor Publico,
and Heraldo, 324 ; the Espagnol, 325 ;
the Expectador, 326; José Salamanca,
327 ; the Tiempo and Correo, 328 ; the
Faro, the Caiolico, the Postdata, the
Esperanza, 329; character of the news-
papers in Madrid, 330, 331; reporters

for the Spanish press, 332.
Orphanhood, 288.
Outlines of Mental and Moral Science,

277.
Parliament, New Houses of, 548.
Peace, the Law of Christ, 552.
Philological Society, proceedings of, 274.
Pictorial Bible, 288.
Pilgrimage, the. By C. A. Wildenhahn,

278.
Poetry of the Age, 490 ; poetic gifts, 491;

poetry not popular, Browning, Macaulay,
492 ; subjects for poets, 493, 194; cha-
racter of Browning, 495, 496 ; his Bells
and Pomegranates, 497 ; the Lost
Leader, 498; Pipha Passes, 499, 500;
the Flight of the Duchy, 502 ; its beau-
ties, 503, 504; the old Gipsy, 505 ;

Good News from Ghent, 507, 508.
Political Economy and Philosophy of Go-

Remains, Additional, of Rev. R. M

M'Cheyne, 287.
Richter, J. P., Life and Works of, 375;

his early history and " Hesperus,” 376;
bis native country, 377; his father and
grandfather, 378; his birth, 379; his
education, 380; his youthful studies,
381; his heterodox sentiments, 382; Ra-
tionalism, 382; Lessing's "Fragments,
384; his first work, 385; his success,
386; his marriage and course of life,
387 ; “ Flowers Fruits, and Thorn
Pieces, 388; “ Walt and Vult,” 389 ;
his humour and learning, 390; his se-
verity, 391 ; his description of the Ven-
ner, 393; the Tun, 394, 395; tbe Gere
man peculiarities, 396; morals of Rich-
ter, 396 ; compared with Stone, 398,
399 ; bis religious reverence, 400; his
speculations, 401, 403; their unchristian
lan, 219; ordained Bishop of Hippo,
220; his contest with the Donatists,
221 ; Pelagius, his doctrine, 222; Ao-
gustine opposes him, and procures his
condemnation, 223; his influence, 294;
his office of judge, 225; his ministry,
226; his sermons, 227 ; his contro-
versies, 228; correspondence with a
Pagan priest, 229; his address to an
astrologer, 230; his intercourse with
Jerome, 231; Jerome's life, 232 ; let-
ters between them, 233; notice of Count
Boniface, 234, 235; Augustine's death
and burial, 236; bis various writings,
237; his retractations and confessions,
238 ; his exegetical writing, 239; his
city of God, 240 ; his sermons, 241;
his intellectual character, 242, 243; his
mental characteristics, 244, 245; his
philosophy, 246, 247; bis theology, ori-
ginal sin, 248, 251; grace, 252, 253 ;
his followers, Jansenists, 254, 255; sum

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vernment. By M. Mignet, 283.

character, 404, 406.
Rock of Israel, 555.
Sermons, Thirty. By Rev. C. A. Fleary,

280.
Spiritual Baptism. By Rev. P. Gell,

557.
Standard Library, Bohn's, works of, 288.
State of the Holy Sepulchre. By G.

Fiolay, 277.
Statistics of the Educational Institutions

of the East India Company in India.
Statistics of the Government Dispensaries

of India, 356. See Hindu Medical Mis-

sions.
Statutes of Merton College, Oxford. By

E. F. Percival, 285.
Sunday-school, The. By Louisa Davids,

553.
Synopsis of Criticisms. By Rev. A. F.

Barrett, 274.
Syrian Churches, their Liturgies and

Literature. By J. W. Etheridge, 283.
Taylor, Bishop Jeremy, his Predecessors,

Contemporaries, and Successors. By

Rev. R. A. Willmott, 287
Temple, J. W., Translation of Kant's

Ethics, 407. See Theoretical Ethics.
Theoretical Ethics, 407; works of Kant,

D. Whewell, and Dr. Wayland, 408 ;
human duty, 409; motive and obliga-
tion, 410; moral obligation, 411; views
of Drs. Paley and Dwight, 412, 413 ;
ground of moral obligation, 414, 416 ;
views of Kant, 417 ; of Dr. Whewell,
417; of Dr. Wayland, 419, 420; theories
of the moral sense, 421, 422; moral ob-
ligation founded on the Divine Essence,
423 ; standard of moral judgment,

W. E. Tayler, 276.
Pope's Works, 40; Annotations of Mr.

Roscoe, 41; their deficiencies, 42; Anec-
dotes by Carll, 43; Critical and His-
torical Notices, 44, 46; Notes by Tyers,
47; Pope and Garrick, 48; Biography
by Ayres, 49; by Dr. Johnson, 50, 51;
his works written early, 52; his Pas-
torals, 53; his labour at correctness,
54, 55; the way to excellence, 56, 57;
Pope compared with other great poets,
58, 59 ; resembled Dryden, 60, 61;
examples illustrative, 62, 63; influence
of Pope's poetry, 64, 65; Augustan age
of English literature, 68; popular au-
thors, 69; Thomson and Defoe, 70;

Richardson, 71.
Press, the Power of the, 553.
Prevention better than Cure. By Mrs.

Ellis, 283.
Protector, A Vindication. By D’Aubigné,

559.
Psalms in Hebrew, with Commentary.

By Rev. G. Phillips, 285.
Pulpit and People. By P. Ryland, 283.
Religions in the World. By F. D. Mau-

rice, 286.

of his character, 256.
Von Tschudi's Travels in Peru, 270.
Wanderingsof a pilgrim. By Dr. Cheerer,

554.
Wayland, F., D.D. Elementary Moral

Science, 407. See Theoretical Ethics.
Weaving, a Treatise on. By G. White,

424 ; experience, tradition, or descrip-
tion, 425; the written will of God, 426 ;
moral sense, 427; conscience, 428 ; dif-
ferent sentiments, 429, 430; human de-
prarity 431; evil propensities, 433 ;
principles of Kant, 434 ; nature of man,
435; true principles of moral obliga-
tion, 436
Theoriæ. By Dr. P. Starkey, 556.
Tyng's, Dr., Recollections of England,

273.
Typology of Scripture. By P. Fairbairn,

557.
Vegetable kingdom, the structure, classi-

fication, and uses of plants. By J.
Lindley, Ph.D.,F.R.S., 439; writers on
natural history, botany, 438; scientific
botanists, 439; systems of Botany, 440;
Dr. Lindley's, 441; number of plants,
442, 443; the Vegetable Lamb, 444 ;
vegetable parasites, 445; connexion of
animal with vegetable life, 446 ; dis-
tinctions, 447 ; differences, 448 ; chemi-
cal qualities, 449, 450 ; lowest animal
and vegetable existences, 451, 452; sen-
sation, distinction, by Linnæus, 453 ;
food of plants and animals, 454 ; aspi-
ration, 455 ; Dr. Lindley's classification,
456, 457 ; its improvement, 458.
Versuch einer Pragmatischen Darstellung

des Augustinismus, &c. By G. F. Wig-
gers, 213; Site of Hippo, in Africa,
where Augustine was bishop, 214; in-
troduction of the gospel to Africa, its
early Christian writers, 215; Cyprian
of Carthage, 216 ; early life of Augus-
tine, 217; his studies, 218; converted
by the preaching of Ambrose at Mi-

282,
Whewell, W., D.D., Elementary Morality,

Lectures on Morality, 407. See
Theoretical Ethics.
Windsor Castle, 550.
Yates, W., D.D., Memoir of. By Dr.

Hoby, 272.
Zambo, a Negro King, Life of, 275.

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