Industry and Ideology: I. G. Farben in the Nazi Era

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 13, 2000 - Business & Economics - 411 pages
0 Reviews
The power of big business in the Third Reich economy remains one of the most important issues of that disastrous era. Drawing on prodigious research in German corporate and government archives, Peter Hayes argues that the IG Farben chemicals combine, Nazi Germany's largest corporation, proved unable to influence national policy outside the firm's sphere of expertise. Indeed, the most infamous aspects of Nazi policy occurred despite IG Farben's advocacy of alternative courses of action. Nonetheless, Farben grew rich under the Nazi regime and was directly involved in some of its greatest crimes. This edition has a new preface that incorporates new developments and research in the field.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The nascent concern 18601933
1
1 Origins and organization
7
2 The search for stability
32
The national revival 19331936
69
3 Revolution and reflation
81
4 From Schacht to Goring
125
The nervous years 19361939
163
5 Autarky and atomization
175
Epilogue
377
Appendixes
385
Manufacturing plants and mines of IG Farben 1929
386
Organization of IG Farben 1931
388
Initial structure of the Four Year Plan 1936
389
Militarization of IG Farbens investments
390
Organization of IG Farben 19381945
391
Organization of Berlin NW7 1937
392

The Nazi empire 19381944
213
6 Greater Germany
219
7 The New Order
266
The nature of war 19391945
319
8 Commerce and complicity
325
Holdings of DAG Bratislava showing the transfers following the Anschluss
393
Locations of plants of SWW and DAG Bratislava
394
Reichs plan for Norwegian lightmetals development June 1941
395
Index
397
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information